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Family Activities

Family-friendly events for families with children of all ages. 

Fused Glass for Dad

Fused Glass Art for Father's

June 8, 2022

5:30 to 7 p.m.

Cost: $30

Due to popular demand we have added another session! Join us in making Dad the catch of the day! Local artist Melissa Neiers will help you make a beautiful fused glass trout piece for the special father figure in your life. We have two one and half hour sessions available. 

Members receive $5 off regular price. If you are member and do not have your code please email imnh@isu.edu to receive your membership discount code!

Fused Glass for Dad

Fused Glass Art for Father's

June 11, 2022

11 to 12:30 SOLD OUT

1 to 2:30 SOLD OUT

Cost: $30

Join us in making Dad the catch of the day! Local artist Melissa Neiers will help you make a beautiful fused glass trout piece for the special father figure in your life. We have two one and half hour sessions available. 

Members receive $5 off regular price. If you are member and do not have your code please email imnh@isu.edu to receive your membership discount code!

Behind the Scenes: Projectile Points with Dr. Andy Speer

Behind the Scenes Projectile Points with Andy Speer

June 7, 2022

6 to 8 p.m.

Cost: $3

Join us for a behind the scenes look into our Don Crabtree stone tool collection with Dr. Andy Speer, Anthropology Curator. Don Crabtree (1912-1980), a renowned flint knapper, that paved the way for scientific analyses of archaeological stone tools around the world. Born in Heyburn, Idaho in 1912, he moved to California in 1931 and soon became the supervisor of the vertebrate and invertebrate laboratory at the Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley. In 1939 he was diagnosed with cancer and returned to Idaho, where he focused on the craft of flint knapping, the reduction of stone to form tools. Crabtree practiced making arrowheads, spear points, and eccentrics by the hour.

Andy was born and raised in South Texas and received my PhD from the University of Texas at San Antonio in Ecological Anthropology in 2013. Following graduation, he served as a post-doctoral researcher at Texas State University in the Department of Anthropology and worked primarily with Clovis Period materials from the Gault Site. Andy’s research focuses on geochemical analysis of knappable stone to determine mobility patterns of prehistoric hunter-gatherers. His current work focuses on sourcing Paleoindian and Protohistoric artifacts from the American Southwest. For this research, it is integral to engage Native American perspectives as they relate to indigenous knowledge of ecological resources and archaeological findings.

Microgreens- where farm-to-table has a whole new meaning

Microgreens Logo

June 15, 2022

6 to 8 p.m.

Cost: $0

Microgreens are ultra-nutritious tiny vegetables that are grown indoors on a table or window sill in just 10 days from seed to harvest. Grow fresh veggies in a tiny area inside your home, year-round. Very easy to grow for ages 3-103, microgreens are the perfect beginner’s garden as well as an excellent addition for the experienced gardener. No special lights are needed.

In this class, you will learn the why and the how of growing microgreens. Learn from a Microgreen Master Gardener and come away with several planted trays as well as full written instructions. Gain interesting and unique ideas on using what you grow to increase your nutrition at each meal.

FAQ

Q: “I kill houseplants, can I be successful with microgreens?”

A- YES! Growing microgreens is much easier than the long-term commitment of houseplants. With less than 2 minutes per day, your microgreens will be ready to harvest and eat in 10 days. This way of growing is super simple.

Q: “I grow sprouts. Are these any different?”

A: YES! Microgreens are not only much safer and easier to grow than sprouts, they are also up to 20% more nutritious- for just a couple of days more growth. Sprouts are the ‘infants’ of the veggie world, microgreens are the ‘toddlers’ that have already begun making nutrients through photosynthesis, increasing the nutrition in the greens substantially.

Q- “Will kids eat microgreens?”

A- YES! Microgreens are tasty- and you don’t need to eat as much as you would full-grown vegetables, making them easier to add to children’s meals. They are also easy to hide in a meal!

 

Instructor Information:

Margo Clayson Information 

This program is sponsored by the Albertson’s Foundation and the Institute of Rural Health.