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Idaho State University

Professors

Donna Lybecker

Donna L. Lybecker

Political Science Department Chair
Professor of International Relations, Environmental Politics, and Comparative Politics

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-3331

lybedonn@isu.edu

Ph.D. Colorado State University, 2003

Donna L. Lybecker's research interests include the politics of borders, environmental politics in the Western U.S. and Latin America, and the framing of political issues. Her specific interests include the US-Mexico border, water issues among the Western states and more recently the role language and narratives play in policy development. Dr. Lybecker has co-authored two books, Great Debates in Environmental History with B. Black (2009), and Cases in International Relations: Pathways to Conflict and Cooperation with G. Hastedt and V. Shannon (2014). And she was named "Distinguished Teacher" at ISU in 2013.

Currently Dr. Lybecker serves as Chair of the Political Science Department and as ISU Science Co-Lead for the NSF EPSCoR Managing Idaho's Landscapes for Ecosystem Services (MILES) project grant. The MILES grant draws together faculty from the bio-physical and social sciences, allowing for research into the complexity of ecosystems and combining ecological research with public values, citizenship styles, and power assessments. Research for MILES also allows Dr. Lybecker to engage the community and local stakeholders. Dr. Lybecker previously worked as a contractor with the U.S. Geological Survey and as a post-doc with the U.S. Forest Service. She continues her research with these scholars.

Outside of ISU, Dr. Lybecker is a member of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Advisory Committee, and an Associate Editor for the Social Science Journal and for the International Journal for Sustainable Society. She also works for the College Board and for the Educational Policy Improvement Center, and is on the Board of Directors for southeast Idaho’s Sagebush Steppe Land Trust.

Select Publications

  1. “The Social Construction of a Border: The US-Canada Border.” Journal of Borderlands Studies. Forthcoming 2017 (with Mark K. McBeth, Adam Brewer, and Carine De Sy).
  2. “Do We Understand What the Public Hears? Stakeholders’ Preferred Communication Choices for Discussing River Issues with the Public,” Review of Policy Research, Vol. 33, No. 4 (2016), 376-392 (with Mark K. McBeth, and James W. Stoutenborough).
  3. “Do Stakeholders Analyze their Audience: The Communication Switch and Stakeholder Personal versus Public Communication Choices,” Policy Sciences. Vol. 49(4) (2016), 421-444 (with Mark K. McBeth, and James W. Stoutenborough).
  4. Cases in International Relations: Pathways to Conflict and Cooperation (with Glenn Hastedt and Vaughn Shannon). CQ Press (2014).
  5. "Trash or Treasure: Recycling Narratives and Reducing Political Polarization, Environmental Politics, Vol. 22, No. 2 (2013), 312-332.
  6. "The Commission for Environmental Cooperation as a Model for Promoting Sustainable Development in the Americas," International Journal of Sustainable Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2011), 151-173 (with Stephen P. Mumme).
  7. The Story of Good Citizenship: Framing Public Policy in the Context of Duty-Based versus Engaged Citizenship (with Mark McBeth and Kacee Garner). Politics and Policy, Vol. 38, No. 1 (2010), 1-23.
  8. The Commission for Environmental Cooperation and Transboundary Conservation across the U.S.-Mexico Border (with Stephen P. Mumme, Osiris Gaona, and Carols Manterola). Conservation of Shared Environments: Learning from the United States and Mexico. Laura Lopez-Hoffman, Emily D. McGovern, Robert G. Varady, and Karl W. Flessa, eds. Tucson, AZ, University of Arizona Press (2009).
  9. The Policy of Border Fencing between the U.S. and Mexico: Permeability and Shifting Functions. Journal of the Southwest, Vol. 50, No. 3, (2008), 335-352.
  10. Great Debates in Environmental History (with Brian C. Black). Greenwood Publishing (2008).


 

Wayne Gabardi

Wayne Gabardi

Professor of Political Philosophy and Theory

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd Floor

(208) 282-4536

gabawayn@isu.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, 1986

Born and raised in New Jersey, Wayne Gabardi received his undergraduate degree in Political Science and Philosophy from Stockton State College, Pomona, New Jersey, in the late 1970s and his master and doctoral degrees in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in the 1980s. His dissertation was on Erich Fromm’s synthesis of Marx and Freud as it related to the early work of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory as well as its later influence on American social and political thought.

He arrived at Idaho State University in the early 1990s and is currently full professor, director of Political Science graduate studies, and teaches in the Honors Program. He was selected as ISU Master Teacher in 2003 and was Department Chair from 2005 to 2012. His areas of professional expertise and interest include the history of Western political philosophy, democratic thought, modern and contemporary social theory, postmodernism, posthumanism, and animal ethics and politics.

While at ISU he has taught a wide variety of courses and seminars including Introduction to U. S. Government, Introduction to Politics, Introduction to Political Philosophy, Contemporary Political Theory, Feminist Thought, Classical Political Thought, Politics and Literature, Democratic Thought, Animal Ethics, Senior Seminar, and the doctoral seminars Philosophy of Social Science and Political Theory. His published work includes the book Negotiating Postmodernism (University of Minnesota Press, 2001) and “Contemporary Models of Democracy” (Polity, Summer 2001). He has recently completed the book The Next Social Contract: Animals, the Anthropocene, and Biopolitics to be published by Temple University Press in 2017.

Curriculum Vitae


 

Mark K. McBeth

Director of the MPA Program
Professor of Political Science

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2740

mcbemark@isu.edu

D.A. Idaho State University, 1992

Dr. Mark K. McBeth has been on faculty in the Department of Political Science since January, 1995. His research focuses on public policy and environmental policy.

An edited book on the Narrative Policy Framework (NPF), The Science of Stories: Applications of the Narrative Policy Framework in Public Policy Analysis (co-edited with Michael D. Jones and Elizabeth A. Shanahan) was published in December, 2014 (Palgrave) and the NPF appeared as a chapter in the third edition of Sabatier and Weible's Theories of the Policy Process also in 2014. His most recent co-authored NPF research has appeared in Review of Policy Research, Policy Sciences, Policy & Internet, Environmental Politics, Journal of Borderland Studies, and Policy Studies Journal. His most recent NPF work is in collaboration with Dr. Donna Lybecker and has found the NPF applied to the study of river restoration, the new media, and international borders.

In his post-doctoral career, Mark has been a principal investigator or co-principal investigator on twenty-three grants and contracts. Mark is also a co-author (with Randy S. Clemons) of Public Policy Praxis: A Case Approach for Understanding Policy and Analysis (3rd edition, Routledge, 2017), a book that has been on the textbook market since July, 2000 and is now in its third edition.

In 2011 and 2015, he was recognized as an "Outstanding Researcher" at Idaho State University. In 2005, he was named "Distinguished Teacher" at ISU. He was named a “Master Teacher” in 2001.

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Recently Taught

  • Public Organizational Theory
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Public Policy Analysis
  • Public Workplace Issues
  • Pedagogy Seminar
  • Introduction to Politics
  • Political Parties and Groups
  • Public Administration and Policy Seminar

Select Publications

  1. The Social Construction of a Border: The US-Canada Border." Journal of Borderlands Studies. Forthcoming 2017 (with Mark K. McBeth, Adam Brewer, and Carine De Sy).
  2. Do Stakeholders Analyze their Audience?: The Communication Switch and Stakeholder Personal versus Public Communication Choices (with Donna L. Lybecker and James W. Stoutenborough). Policy Sciences Vol. 33, No. 4 (2016), 376-392.
  3. Do We Understand What the Public Hears? Stakeholders’ Preferred Communication Choices for Decision Makers when Discussing River Issues with the Public (with Donna L. Lybecker, James W. Stoutenborough) Review of Policy Research Vol. 33, No. 4 (2016), 376-392.
  4. Content Matters: Stakeholders Assessment of River Stories or River Science (with Donna L. Lybecker, James W. Stoutenborough, Katrina Running, Sarah Davis). Public Policy and Administration, published online first, October, 2016.
  5. Public Policy Praxis: A Case Approach for Understanding Policy and Analysis, 3rd edition (with Randy S. Clemons), New York: Routledge (2017).
  6. Do New Media Support New Policy Narratives? The Social Construction of the US-Mexico Border on YouTube (with Donna L. Lybecker, Mark K. McBeth, Maria A. Husmann, and Nicholas Pelikan. Policy & Internet, Vol. 7 (4), 497-525 (2015).
  7. The Narrative Policy Framework (with Michael D. Jones and Elizabeth A. Shanahan). Chapter 7 (pages 225-266) in Theories of the Policy Process, third edition. Christopher M. Weible and Paul A. Sabatier (eds). Boulder: Westview Press (2014).
  8. The Science of Stories: Applications of the Narrative Policy Framework in Public Policy Analysis (with co-editors Michael D. Jones and Elizabeth A. Shanahan). New York: Palgrave (2014).
  9. The Social Construction of a Crisis: Policy Narratives and Contemporary U.S. Obesity Policy (with Randy S. Clemons, Maria A. Husmann, Elizabeth Kusko, Alethea Gaarden). Risk, Hazards, & Crisis in Public Policy, Vol. 3(4),135-163 (2013).
  10. An Angel on the Wind: How Heroic Policy Narratives Shape Policy Realities. (with Elizabeth A. Shanahan and Michael Jones) Policy Studies Journal, 41(3), 453-483 (2013).


 

Associate Professors

Kellee Kirkpatrick

Kellee J. Kirkpatrick

Director of Graduate Studies
Associate Professor of American Politics and Public Policy

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2550

kirkkell@isu.edu

http://www.kelleekirkpatrick.com

Ph.D. University of Kansas, 2012

Dr. Kellee J. Kirkpatrick earned her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Kansas where she concentrated her studies in American politics and public policy. She also earned a graduate certificate in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies from KU. Dr. Kirkpatrick has a diverse educational background including a master's degree in Strategic Communications and undergraduate degrees in Public Relations, Print Journalism, and Vocal Performance. 

Dr. Kirkpatrick's research agenda examines issues of women’s health and reproductive policy and specifically focuses on questions that concern how and why governments regulate private, social issues. Her research often explores how policy evolves at the intersection of morality and economic interests.  Because these issues are often the focus of public attention, her research examines how interest group activity and media frames influence public opinion, political behavior, and the policy process. Dr. Kirkpatrick has published her work in academic journals including Policy Studies Journal, Politics, Groups and Identities, and Climate.

Dr. Kirkpatrick has extensive teaching experience at several universities including the University of Kansas, Texas A&M University, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and now Idaho State University. She has taught courses in American politics, state politics, public policy, research methods, media and politics, women in politics, health policy, reproductive politics, and grant writing. She enjoys engaging students in the research process and has co-authored several conference papers and journal articles with her undergraduate and graduate students. She is currently the adviser of the Political Science Club and the Alpha Phi Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society. 

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

  • The Presidency
  • Political Parties and Interest Groups
  • Women and Politics
  • Media and Politics
  • Reproductive Politics and Policy
  • Health Politics and Policy
  • Public Policy Theory
  • State and Local Politics
  • Research Methods
  • Grant Writing

Select Publications

  1. Strategery, Narratives, and Reading the Public: Developing a Micro-Level Theory of Political Strategies within the Narrative Policy Framework. (with James W. Stoutenborough). Policy Studies Journal (Forthcoming).
  2. If ‘This is What a Feminist Looks Like,’ I Don’t Like It. (with James W. Stoutenborough). In The Hollywood Connection, ed. Heather E. Yates and Tim Hill. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 59-85 (Forthcoming).
  3. The 'Not Yet Pregnant': The Impact of Narratives on Infertility Identity and Reproductive Policy." In Narrative, Identity, and Academic Community in Higher Eduation, eds. Brian Attebery, John Gribas, Mark K. McBeth, Paul Sivitz, and Kandi Turley-Ames. New York, NY: Routledge, 111-128 (2017).
  4. What Butterfly Effect? The Contextual Differences in Public Perceptions of teh Health Risk Posed by Climate Change. (with James W. Stoutenborough, M. Jeremy Field, and Arnold Vedlitz). Climate 3(3): 668-688 (2015).
  5. Climate Scientists and Environmental Interest Groups: The Intersection of Expertise and Advocacy. (with Rebecca Bromley-Trujillo, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz). Politics, Groups, and Identities, 2(1): 120-134 (2014).
  6. Giving Girls a Shot: An Examination of Mandatory Vaccination Legislation. (with Alesha E. Doan). Policy Studies Journal, 41(2): 295-318 (2013).
  7. Confidence in the Press: The Impact of Political Events on an Individual's Confidence. (with James W. Stoutenborough). Public Opinion Pros, www.publicopinionpros.com, April (2007).


 

Assistant Professors

Colin Johnson

Colin Johnson

Assistant Professor

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2540

johncoli@isu.edu

https://www.colinrjohnson.net/

Ph.D. Brown University, 2017

Dr. Colin Johnson's research is at the intersection of international migration and development, incorporating human security, political demography, and ethnic conflict. His empirical expertise is in post-communist Eurasia, including field experience in the Russian Federation, Kyrgyzstan, and Estonia. 

Dr. Johnson received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 2017 and then taught as a UCIS Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies and the Department of Political Science at the Universit of Pittsburgh from 2017-2019.

Curriculum Vitae


 

Edward F. Kammerer, Jr.

Edward F. Kammerer, Jr.

Assistant Professor

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2799

kammedwa@isu.edu

http://edward-kammerer.com/

Ph.D. Northeastern University, 2014

Dr. Edward Kammerer joined the Political Science Department in 2019. He taught previously at Northeastern University, Skidmore College, and Occidental College. His research and teaching interests are centered on the role of the court system in public policy change, with a particular focus on LGBT rights. He is particularly interested in the role of framing and storytelling in the arguments litigators use in the courts. He also researches political science pedagogy, with a particular focus on simulations in the classroom.

Curriculum Vitae


 

Shin Kue Ryu

Shin Kue Ryu

Assistant Professor

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2487

ryushin@isu.edu

Ph.D. George Mason University, 2016

Shin Kue Ryu’s research interests include politics and sustainable development goals, strengthening public sector capacity building in developing country contexts, and infrastructure development implementation frameworks. His specific interests include expansion of equal access to government services in development country contexts, water and sanitation infrastructure policies in Asia and the Pacific countries, and the role of politics in achieving sustainable development goals.

Dr. Ryu was the principal researcher for WaterAid’s comparative sanitation case studies of Malaysia, Singapore, and South Korea. The research serves to demonstrate that universal access to sanitation can be achieved within a single generation. A research that was much needed in light of the failing to meet the Millennium Development Goal on sanitation, which signaled a need to depart from the status quo. The research has been cited as a solution to Asia’s challenge on sanitation by the Asian Development Bank’s flagship report, the Asian Water Development Outlook 2016.

Dr. Ryu also brings professional experience of having worked at the World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC. His experiences involve being the researcher for the World Bank’s Public-Private Partnership Reference Guide 2.0 and Delivering Universal and Sustainable Water Services: Partnering with the Private Sector – Guidance Note. He is also the co-author of OECD Public-Private Partnerships: The Relevance of Budgeting publication, which was presented at the OECD Senior Budget Officials Meeting.

Interests in his research has often translated to invited talks, as he has been a special guest presenter at Asian Development Bank, Korea Environmental Institute, and Sungkyunkwan University’s Water Institute among others. In 2017, he will be speaking at the World Toilet Association to deliver a plan on how to tackle the global sanitation challenge.

Dr. Shin Kue Ryu received his PhD from the Schar School of Policy and Government in George Mason University, where he also received the Outstanding Doctoral Student Award for his dissertation. He received his MSc from Queen Mary University of London and his MA from Washington University in Saint Louis. He also received his BA from Washington University in Saint Louis.


 

James Stoutenborough

James W. Stoutenborough

Assistant Professor of American Politics and Public Policy
Affiliate Faculty of Environmental Science and Management

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-2643

stoujame@isu.edu

http://www.jameswstoutenborough.com/

Ph.D. University of Kansas, 2010

Dr. James W. Stoutenborough joined the Department of Political Science at Idaho State University in May, 2014, as a Postdoctoral Research Associate. Dr. Stoutenborough is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Science, Technology, and Public Policy in the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Previously, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute for Science, Technology, and Public Policy.

Dr. Stoutenborough's research and teaching interests included public policy, U.S. state politics, public opinion, and political psychology with a substantive interest in science and technology issues like climate change and renewable energy. His research can be found in both the institutional and behavioral paradigms, which he believes need to be better integrated.

From an institutional perspective, Dr. Stoutenborough examines why institutions (normally, U.S. states) reach particular policy decisions. This is typically achieved using the theory of policy diffusion. Through this research, Dr. Stoutenborough has identified two new approaches to policy diffusion (organizational diffusion with Dr. Kellee J. Kirkpatrick and a hybrid model of diffusion), both of which are currently under peer-review.

Within the behavioral paradigm, he is currently researching individual-level behavior as it pertains to political attitude formation, problem identification, agenda setting, and policy adoption. Specifically, his research examines how risk perceptions, knowledge, trust, and various attitudes influence aspects of the policy process.

Dr. Stoutenborough believes that once social scientists understand the motivations behind individual behavior, they can begin to better understand how institutional forces influence the policy process. For example, he is currently working on a project with Dr. Douglas Oxley that identifies the causal reasoning used by individuals during the policy diffusion process. This understanding of individual behavior better allows policy scholars to understand how individuals process new information and reach policy decisions. With this knowledge, policy scholars can examine how institutional differences influence this information processing.

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

  • Introduction to American Government (Undergraduate)
  • Politics & Film (Undergraduate)
  • Comparative U.S. State Politics (Undergraduate)
  • Voting & Public Opinion (Undergraduate & Graduate)
  • Science & Technology Policy (Undergraduate & Graduate)
  • Research Methods (Undergraduate & Graduate)
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods (Graduate)
  • State & Local Politics (Graduate)
  • Environmental Policy (Graduate)
  • Public Policy Process (Graduate)

Select Publications

  1. Robinson, Scott E., James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. Forthcoming. Understanding Trust in Government: Environmental Sustainability, Fracking, and Public Opinion in American Politics. New York: Routledge.
  2. Robinson, Scott E., James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. Forthcoming. “Assessing Public Support for Government Policy: Comparing Experimental and Attitudinal Approaches.” In Sabastian Jilke, Oliver James, and Gregg Van Ryzin (Eds.), Experiments in Public Administration Research: Challenges and Contributions. New York: Cambridge University Press. Pp. ?-?.
  3. Liu, Xinsheng, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. Forthcoming. “Bureaucratic Expertise, Overconfidence, and Policy Choice.” Governance ().
  4. McBeth, Mark K., Donna L. Lybecker, James W. Stoutenborough, Sarah N. Davis, and Katrina Running. Forthcoming. “Content Matters: Stakeholder Assessment of River Stories or River Science.” Public Policy and Administration ().
  5. Mahafza, Zachary B., James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. Forthcoming. “The Role of Proximity in Problem Identification: Risk of Water Scarcity in Texas.” Water Policy ().
  6. McBeth, Mark K., Donna L. Lybecker, and James W. Stoutenborough. 2016. “Do Stakeholders Analyze their Audience? The Communication Switch and Stakeholder Personal versus Public Communication Choices.” Policy Sciences 49(4): 421-444.
  7. Stoutenborough, James W., Scott E. Robinson, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2016. “A Respone to “Word Choice Matters: Comment on Stoutenborough et al. 2016, ‘Is “Fracking” a New Dirty Word?” Energy Research & Social Science 20(October): 10-13.
  8. Lybecker, Donna L., Mark K. McBeth, and James W. Stoutenborough. 2016. “Do We Understand What the Public Hears? Stakeholders’ Preferred Communication Choices for Discussing River Issues with the Public.” Review of Policy Research 33(4): 376-392.
  9. Stoutenborough, James W., and Arnold Vedlitz. 2016. "The Role of Scientific Knowledge in the Public’s Perceptions of Energy Technology Risks." Energy Policy 96(September): 206-216.
  10. Stoutenborough, James W., Scott E. Robinson, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2016. “Is ‘Fracking’ a New Dirty Word? The Influence of Word Choice on Public Views toward Natural Gas Attitudes.” Energy Research and Social Science 17(July): 52-58.
  11. Stoutenborough, James W., Arnold Vedlitz, and Xin Xing. 2016. “Are all Risk Perceptions Created Equal? Comparing General Risk Assessments and Specific Risk Assessments Associated with Climate Change.” Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal 22(1): 50-70.
  12. Stoutenborough, James W. 2015. “Stakeholders’ Preferred Policy Solution: Comparing Strategies to Address Degraded Levees.” Water Policy 17(6): 1093-1107.
  13. Bromley-Trujillo, Rebecca, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2015. "Scientific Advocacy, Environmental Interest Groups, and Climate Change: Are Climate Skeptic Portrayals of Climate Scientists as Biased Accurate?" Climatic Change 133(4): 607-619.
  14. Stoutenborough, James W., and Arnold Vedlitz. 2015. “Knowledge, Information, and Views of Climate Change: An Examination of Coastal Stakeholders along the Gulf of Mexico.” Climate 3(4): 983-998.
  15. Stoutenborough, James W. 2015. “Revisiting River Management Options: Stakeholders, Levees, and the Public Policy Controversies of Degraded Infrastructure.” Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy 6(2): 239-257.
  16. Stoutenborough, James W., Kellee J. Kirkpatrick, M. Jeremy Field, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2015. “What Butterfly Effect? The Contextual Differences in Public Perceptions of the Health Risk Posed by Climate Change.” Climate 3(3): 668-688.
  17. Liu, Xinsheng, Arnold Vedlitz, James W. Stoutenborough, and Scott E. Robinson. 2015. “Scientists’ Views and Positions on Global Warming and Climate Change: A Content Analysis of Congressional Testimonies.” Climatic Change 131(4): 487-503.
         - Featured in:
              - Nature Climate Change 5(6): 515 (2015).
              - Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, September 1, 2015.
  18. Stoutenborough, James W., Rebecca Bromley-Trujillo, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2015. “How to Win Friends and Influence People: Climate Scientists’ Perspectives on their Relationship with and Influence on Government Officials.” Journal of Public Policy 35(2): 269-296.
  19. Stoutenborough, James W. 2015. “Cheap and Clean: How Americans Think about Energy in the Age of Global Warming.” Review of Policy Research 32(6): 747-748.
  20. Stoutenborough, James W., Liu Shi, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2015. “Probing Public Perceptions on Energy: Support for a Comparative, Deep-Probing Survey Design for Complex Issue Domains.” Energy 81(March): 406-415.
  21. Stoutenborough, James W., Arnold Vedlitz, and Xinsheng Liu. 2015. “The Influence of Specific Risk Perceptions on Public Policy Support: An Examination of Energy Policy.” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 658(1): 102-120.
  22. Stoutenborough, James W., Robert N. Fette, Arnold Vedlitz, and Carol Goldsmith. 2014. “Understanding the Communication of Climate Change Risk: Climate Scientists’ Perspectives of Media Sources and Policy Makers.” Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy 5(4): 365-384.
  23. Stoutenborough, James W., Rebecca Bromley-Trujillo, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2014. “Public Support for Climate Change Policy: Consistency in the Influence of Values and Attitudes over Time and Across Specific Policy Alternatives.” Review of Policy Research 31(6): 555-583.
  24. Bromley-Trujillo, Rebecca, James W. Stoutenborough, Kellee J. Kirkpatrick, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2014. “Climate Scientists and Environmental Interest Groups: The Intersection of Expertise and Advocacy.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 2(1): 120-134.
  25. Stoutenborough, James W., and Arnold Vedlitz. 2014. “The Effect of Perceived and Assessed Knowledge of Climate Change on Public Policy Concerns: An Empirical Comparison.” Environmental Science & Policy 37(March): 23-33.
  26. Stoutenborough, James W., and Arnold Vedlitz. 2014. “Public Attitudes toward Water Management and Drought in the United States.” Water Resources Management 28(3): 697-714.
  27. Stoutenborough, James W., Xinsheng Liu, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2014. “Trends in Public Attitudes: The Influence of the Economy and Climategate on Risk, Information, and Public Policy.” Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy 5(1): 22-37.
  28. Stoutenborough, James W., and Arnold Vedlitz. 2013. "Public Attitudes toward Water Management and Drought in Texas." Texas Water Journal 4(2): 47-61.
  29. Mumpower, Jeryl L., Liu Shi, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2013. “Psychometric and Demographic Predictors of the Perceived Risk of Terrorist Threats and the Willingness to Pay for Risk Management Programs.” Risk Analysis 33(10): 1802-1811.
  30. Stoutenborough, James W., Shelbi G. Sturgess, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2013. “Knowledge, Risk, and Policy Support: Public Perceptions of Nuclear Power.” Energy Policy 62(11): 176-184.
         - Featured in Advances in Engineering, February 4, 2015.
  31. Bies, Angela, Deanna Green Lee, Charles Lindsey, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2013. “Citizens, Nonprofits and Climate Change Policy.” Nonprofit Policy Forum 4(1): 5-28.
  32. Robinson, Scott E., Xinsheng Liu, James W. Stoutenborough, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2013. “Explaining Popular Trust in the Department of Homeland Security.” Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 23(3): 713-733.
  33. Tucker, Justin A., James W. Stoutenborough, and R. Matthew Beverlin. 2012. “Geographic Proximity in the Diffusion of Concealed Weapons Permit Laws.” Politics & Policy 40(6): 1081-1105.
  34. Stoutenborough, James W., and Matthew Beverlin. 2008. “Encouraging Pollution-Free Energy: The Diffusion of State Net Metering Policies.” Social Science Quarterly 89(5): 1230-1251.
  35. Stoutenborough, James W., and Donald P. Haider-Markel. 2008. “Public Confidence in the U.S. Supreme Court: A New Look at the Impact of Court Decisions.” Social Science Journal 45(1): 28-47.
  36. Kirkpatrick, Kellee J., and James W. Stoutenborough. 2007. “Turn of Events: Public Confidence in the Media.” Public Opinion Pros, April. (an open access journal that no longer exists)
  37. Stoutenborough, James W., Donald P. Haider-Markel, and Mahalley D. Allen. 2006. “Reassessing the Impact of Supreme Court Decisions on Public Opinion: Gay Civil Rights Cases.” Political Research Quarterly 59(3): 419-433.


 

Megan Warnement

Megan K. Warnement

Assistant Professor

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd floor

(208) 282-5230

warnmeg4@isu.edu

Ph.D. North Carolina State University, 2018

Dr. Megan Warnement's research focuses include narrative policy and multiple streams framework, crisis management and theories of the public policy process. She has taught courses in American government, film and politics, disaster policy and public policy.

Dr. Warnement has received two grants to study policymaking and has acted as a teaching and research assistant at Duke University. Outside of academia, she has worked as a field representative and constituent liaison for an Ohio congressman and as a law clerk.

She received her Ph.D. in public administration, public policy process and disaster policy from North Carolina State University. She received an M.P.A. with an emphasis in public policy process and a B.A. in political science from the University of Dayton.


 

Adjunct Faculty

Thomas Eckert

Thomas E. Eckert

Adjunct Lecturer

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd Floor

eckethom@isu.edu


 

Henry Evans

Henry T. Evans

Adjunct Lecturer
Associate Director of the Office of Equity and Inclusion and the Diversity Resource Center

Office: Rendezvous 157D

(208) 282-4223

evanhenr@isu.edu

D.A. Idaho State University, 2011


 

Support Staff

Adell Washburn

Adell Washburn

Administrative Assistant

Office: Graveley Hall, North Wing, 3rd Floor

(208) 282-2211

washadel@isu.edu

B.A. Idaho State University, 2016

Strengths and Skills

  • Receptionist
  • Intra-University Communications
  • Records-Keeper for Department Programs
  • Office Management and Budget
  • General Facilitator for Faculty and Students


 

Emeritus Faculty

  • Dr. Mary Jane Burns
  • Dr. Richard H. Foster, Jr.
  • Dr. Victor (Butch) Hjelm
  • Dr. Doug Nilson
  • Dr. Ralph Maughan
  • Dr. Sean Anderson

 


 

Political Science

pols@isu.edu

(208) 282-2211

(208) 282-4833

921 S. 8th Ave, Stop 8073

Pocatello, ID 83201

 

 

Gravely Hall
Top Floor of the North Wing