General Education Objectives and Learning Outcomes

General Education Courses

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate the following competencies:

  1. Use flexible writing process strategies to generate, develop, revise, edit, and proofread texts.
  2. Adopt strategies and genre appropriate to the rhetorical situation.
  3. Use inquiry-based strategies to conduct research that explores multiple and diverse ideas and perspectives, appropriate to the rhetorical context.
  4. Use rhetorically appropriate strategies to evaluate, represent, and respond to the ideas and research of others.
  5. Address readers' biases and assumptions with well-developed evidence-based reasoning.
  6. Use appropriate conventions for integrating, citing, and documenting source material as well as for surface-level language and style.
  7. Read, interpret, and communicate key concepts in writing and rhetoric.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate the following competencies.

  1. Research, discover, and develop information resources and structure spoken messages to increase knowledge and understanding.
  2. Research, discover, and develop evidence-based reasoning and persuasive appeals for ethically influencing attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.
  3. Adapt spoken messages to the diverse personal, ideological, and emotional needs of individuals, groups, or contexts.
  4. Employ effective spoken and nonverbal behaviors that support communication goals and illustrate self-efficacy.
  5. Listen in order to effectively and critically evaluate the reasoning, evidence, and communication strategies of self and others.
  6. Understand key theories, perspectives, principles, and concepts in the Communication discipline, as applied to oral communication.

Upon completion of a course in this category, a student is able to demonstrate the following competencies.

  1. Read, interpret, and communicate mathematical concepts.
  2. Represent and interpret information/data.
  3. Select, execute and explain appropriate strategies/procedures when solving mathematical problems.
  4. Apply quantitative reasoning to draw and support appropriate conclusions.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate at least five (5) of the following competencies.

  1. Recognize and describe humanistic, historical, or artistic works within problems and patterns of the human experience.
  2. Distinguish and apply terminologies, methodologies, processes, epistemologies, and traditions specific to the discipline(s).
  3. Perceive and understand formal, conceptual, and technical elements specific to the discipline.
  4. Analyze, evaluate, and interpret texts, objects, events, or ideas in their cultural, intellectual or historical contexts.
  5. Interpret artistic and/or humanistic works through the creation of art or performance.
  6. Develop critical perspectives or arguments about the subject matter, grounded in evidence-based analysis.
  7. Demonstrate self-reflection, intellectual elasticity, widened perspective, and respect for diverse viewpoints.

Upon completion of a course in this category, a student is able to demonstrate at least four (4) of the following competencies.

  1. Apply foundational knowledge and models of a natural or physical science to analyze and/or predict phenomena.
  2. Understand the scientific method and apply scientific reasoning to critically evaluate arguments.
  3. Interpret and communicate scientific information via written, spoken and/or visual representations.
  4. Describe the relevance of specific scientific principles to the human experience.
  5. Form and test a hypothesis in the laboratory or field using discipline-specific tools and techniques for data collection and/or analysis.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate at least four (4) of the following competencies.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical and conceptual frameworks of a particular Social Science discipline.
  2. Develop an understanding of self and the world by examining the dynamic interaction of individuals, groups, and societies as they shape and are shaped by history, culture, institutions, and ideas.
  3. Utilize Social Science approaches, such as research methods, inquiry, or problem-solving, to examine the variety of perspectives about human experiences.
  4. Evaluate how reasoning, history, or culture informs and guides individual, civic, or global decisions.
  5. Understand and appreciate similarities and differences among and between individuals, cultures, or societies across space and time.

Critical thinking is defined as the ability to think analytically, critically, creatively, and reflectively to make informed and logical judgments, draw reasoned and meaningful conclusions, and apply ideas to new contexts. Courses satisfying this Objective must include active learning.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate the following competencies.

  1. Formulate/frame problems and analyze how others do so;
  2. Recognize and apply appropriate practices for analyzing ambiguous problems;
  3. Identify and apply relevant information for problem-solving;
  4. Create, analyze, and evaluate/interpret diverse perspectives and solutions;
  5. Establish a reasoned framework for drawing conclusions and/or recommending solutions; and
  6. Effectively articulate the results of a thinking process.

Information literacy is defined as the ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and use information effectively. Courses satisfying this Objective must involve hands-on practice for students rather than merely the presentation of theoretical principles.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate the following competencies.

  1. Determine the nature and extent of the information/data needed to accomplish a specific purpose;
  2. Identify sources and gather information/data effectively and efficiently;
  3. Evaluate credibility of sources and information/data;
  4. Understand the economics, ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding the creation, collection, and use of information/data; and
  5. Use information/data effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.

Upon completion of a course in this category, students are able to demonstrate the following competencies.

  1. Identify the defining characteristics of culturally diverse communities in regional, national, or global contexts;
  2. Describe the influence of cultural attributes such as ability, age, class, epistemology, ethnicity, gender, language, nationality, politics, or religion inherent in different cultures or communities; and
  3. Apply knowledge of diverse cultures to address contemporary or historical issues.

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