Linda Hatzenbuehler retires from Idaho State University after 44 years of service

Linda Hatzenbuehler retired in December after 44 years of service at Idaho State University. Hatzenbuehler first came to ISU in 1976 to fill a temporary position in the Department of Psychology, and was a professor until 1986 when she became the dean of the Kasiska College of Health Professions. She has spent the last seven years working as dean and associate vice president for the ISU Division of Health Sciences. Although Hatzenbuehler is retiring, she will be remembered as a professor, mentor

Linda Hatzenbuehler retires from Idaho State University after 44 years of service

Linda Hatzenbuehler retired in December after 44 years of service at Idaho State University. Hatzenbuehler first came to ISU in 1976 to fill a temporary position in the Department of Psychology, and was a professor until 1986 when she became the dean of the Kasiska College of Health Professions. She has spent the last seven years working as dean and associate vice president for the ISU Division of Health Sciences. Although Hatzenbuehler is retiring, she will be remembered as a professor, mentor and dean forever.

Hatzenbuehler had many accomplishments while working at ISU. She has been recognized for a number of awards, including ISU’s Distinguished Service Award, a Special Appreciation Award from the Idaho Department of Correction and Greater Pocatello Chamber of Commerce, the President’s Award from Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions and the Health Professional of the Year from Idaho Public Health Association.

In the spring of 2009, Hatzenbuehler’s former colleague Delane Kritsky, named a parasitic worm, Haliotrematoides hatzenbuehlerae after her. The worm lives in the gills of yellow-banded snapper off Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Kritsky said he named the worm after Hatzenbuehler because she always supported his research, and in appreciation Kritsky would name the next species he found after her.

 “I have so many memorable times at ISU, given my long career,” Hatzenbuehler said. “Overall, my fondest memory is watching how the footprint of the health professions has expanded at ISU. When I became Dean in 1986, I had eight programs to oversee and one clinic. When I left, I had over 20 programs under my purview at multiple sites, including a major presence on the Meridian campus, and multiple outpatient clinics. We are now the destination site for health professional education in Idaho.”

Hatzenbuehler received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from John Carroll University in 1969, and she continued her education at Kent State University completing her Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 1977. While attending Kent State University she met and married her husband Ron. Ron was also a professor of history at ISU, and taught from 1972 until his retirement in 2013. They raised three children in Pocatello and now have two grandchildren. Throughout the years, Hatzenbuehler has never lost her connection with her profession of psychology. She is a licensed psychologist with a special certification in forensics. She will continue to do some teaching in psychology, supervise students interested in forensic work and work in private practice. Hatzenbuehler is on the Psychologist Licensure Board and chairs the Idaho Council on Suicide Prevention, needless to say she will have plenty to keep her busy after retirement.

 

Written by Sophie Bissell, College of Arts & Letters intern

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