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Curt Anderson

Curt Anderson, Ph.D.

Professor
Comparative Neuroethology

Office: Life Sciences 330

(208) 282-5813

andecurt@isu.edu

Anderson Lab of Comparative Neurobiology and Behavior

We study comparative neurobiology, neuroethology, neural control of movement.

Education

1996, Ph.D. Zoology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ
1992, M.S. Biology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ
1989, B.S. Biology, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO

1996-1998, NIH Postdoctoral fellow, University of South Dakota School of Medicine

Biographical Sketch

Dr Anderson joined the Biological Sciences department in 1998. His interest in herpetology has been a life long endeavor, and his work in the neural control of behavior began as a graduate student when at Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. While a post-doctoral researcher at the University of South Dakota Medical School, he began to develop techniques in neurophysiology. His interest in neuroethology and evolutionary neurobiology continues at Idaho State University. The Anderson lab focuses on the neuromechanics of coordinated movement, using frogs, toads and turtles as model organisms. Dr. Anderson has over 20 publications and the Anderson lab has given over 50 presentations at regional, national and international science meetings. He resides along the Snake River near Pingree, ID with a kennel of racing sleddogs.

Teaching

BIOL 472/572 Clinical Physiology
BIOL 464/564 Lectures in Human Physiology
BIOL 314 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
BIOL 499/599 Fundamentals of Biological Imaging

Selected Publications

*Clark NL, *Carter L, *Christensen and CW Anderson (in review, 2006). Anatomical convergence of sensory projections into the brainstem of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. Journal of Comparative Physiology A

*Wiklund, JM and CW Anderson (in review, 2006). Distribution of hypoglossal motor neurons in the brainstem of the African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis Neuroscience Letters

*Chiddix DN and CW Anderson (in review, 2006) The role of the cerebellum during feeding in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. in review: Physiology and Behavior

*Wolff, JB, M Lee* and CW Anderson (2004). The contribution of the submentalis muscle to feeding mechanics in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens 301A:666-673 J. Experimental Zoology

Anderson, CW (2001). Anatomical evidence for brainstem circuits mediating feeding motor programs in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. 140:12-19 Experimental Brain Research

*Harwood, D.V. and C. W. Anderson (2000). Evidence for the anatomical origins of hypoglossal afferents in the tongue of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. 862(1-2):288-291 Brain Research

Anderson C.W. and J. Keifer (1999). Properties of conditioned abducens nerve responses in the absence of the sustained component of the reflex. 81:1242-1250 J Neurophysiology

Anderson C.W., K. C. Nishikawa and J. Keifer (1998). Distribution of hypoglossal motor neurons innervating the prehensile tongue of the African pig-nosed frog, Hemisus marmoratum. 244(1):5-8. Neuroscience Letters

Anderson C.W. and J. Keifer (1998). Evidence for a photosensitive region in the caudal mesencephalon of the turtle brain. 119(4):453-459. Experimental Brain Research

Anderson C.W. and J. Keifer (1997). The cerebellum and red nucleus are not required for in vitro classical conditioning of the turtle abducens nerve. 17(24):9736-9745. J Neuroscience

Anderson C.W. and K.C. Nishikawa (1997). The functional anatomy of hypoglossal afferents in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. 771/2:285-291. Brain Research

(*indicates undergraduate researchers)

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