News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

May 12, 2014 — Vol. 30 No. 17

Faculty/Staff Updates

We have awarded our ISU Cares Spot Award winners for March

We have awarded our ISU Cares Spot Award winners for March. Due to a website issue we are late announcing the newest winners. We will award the recipients for April and May together in early June. Our apologies to the winners for this late recognition.

Mary Elder, Tiffany Waggoner, Chanel Quirk, Amanda Christensen, Alicia Hardin and Shalese Taylor were all honored as March ISU Cares Spot Award winners.

To commend an ISU employee for their customer service, or to let us know where we need improvement, click ISU Cares Survey. Please contact HR Employee Learning and Professional Development for questions or comments. We have updated our ISU Cares website to showcase all of our recent winners with a personal bio and pictures. Thanks!

ISU-Meridian assistant professor Todd Talley was a guest speaker at a May 2 symposium at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California-Berkeley

ISU-Meridian assistant professor Todd Talley was a guest speaker at a May 2 symposium at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California-Berkeley.

The title of his presentation was "A quest for specificity: the Acetylcholine binding protein as a tool for drug discovery."

Talley, an assistant professor in the College of Pharmacy's biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences department, has also been invited to speak on the same topic at the 2014 Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society at the University of Montana, June 22-25, in Missoula.

Talley is working on the frontier of drug discovery- a new approach to developing pharmaceuticals by understanding how disease and infection are controlled at the molecular and physiological level. That knowledge could one day lead to new drugs and therapies to effectively treat cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and myasthenia gravis.

ISU School of Performing Arts - Dance faculty members and students presented research, workshops, and creative work at the annual Northwest Region meeting of the American College Dance Festival Association Conference

ISU School of Performing Arts - Dance faculty members Dr. Lauralee Zimmerly and Molly Jorgensen, along with graduating senior Victor Gomez and MA student Omar Raudez, presented research, workshops, and creative work at the annual Northwest Region meeting of the American College Dance Festival Association Conference in Missoula, Montana.

Zimmerly, Jorgensen and Sheena Phelps traveled to University of Montana with a group of 17 dance major and minor students to attend the ACDFA Northwest Conference in April 2014. ISU Emeritus faculty member Dr. Marcia Llody donated funds to help students attend the conference.

The primary focus of the ACDFA organization is to "support and promote the wealth of talent and creativity that is prominent throughout college and university dance departments."

The regional conference provides the venue for students and faculty to engage in four days of "performances, workshops, panels, and master classes taught by instructors from around the region and country."

The conference also provides the unique opportunity for students and faculty to have their dance works adjudicated by a panel of nationally recognized dance professionals in an open and constructive forum.

News Bites

The Physician Assistant Program is looking for men to be mock patients in a physical health exam practice

The Physician Assistant Program is looking for men to be mock patients in a physical health exam practice.

Men are needed for a non-diagnostic physical health exam practice to be performed by the Idaho State University Physician Assistant Program June 3 at 8 a.m. The exercise will take four or five hours, and volunteers will be compensated for their time. For more information concerning this opportunity or to volunteer, please call Kaitlynn at the Department of PA Studies' front desk at ext. 4726.

Students Kristin Moore, Cory Nelson and Sarah Weber are the Idaho State University Division of Health Sciences (DHS) 2014 Graduates of Distinction

Students Kristin Moore, Cory Nelson and Sarah Weber are the Idaho State University Division of Health Sciences (DHS) 2014 Graduates of Distinction.

Moore is Outstanding Researcher, Nelson is Outstanding Leader, and Weber is Outstanding Clinician.

The award celebrates the academic, professional and extracurricular achievements of graduate and undergraduate students in DHS programs.

Candidates are nominated by faculty, staff, students, deans, community leaders and preceptors. Recipients are selected by the DHS Executive Council.

Outstanding Researcher
Kristin Moore, who is based at the ISU-Meridian Health Science Center, will graduate in May with a Master of Public Health degree.

"When I was growing up, public health was often a topic of discussion at home," recalled Moore, the daughter of a family physician and a community health nurse.

Passionate about improving health care in underserved communities, Moore has played a key role in ISU-Meridian/Ada County Community Health Screening events by assisting with promotion and site location, organizing supplies, and maintaining the project's complex computer database.

A gifted scholar and researcher, Moore has co-authored numerous presentations relating to the Community Health Screening events and other research projects. For the past two years, she has served in the Career Path Internship program, which offers paid opportunities for students to gain professional experience in their areas of study.

Raised in Joliet, Montana, Moore also holds a bachelor's degree in social work from University of Montana. Her goal is to continue to work with ISU-Meridian's Community Health Screening program.

Outstanding Leader
Cory Nelson, who grew up in the northern Idaho community of Troy, will graduate in May with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. He studied chemistry at Washington State University and ISU before enrolling in the pharmacy program at ISU-Meridian.

"I've always wanted to do something in medicine and health care. Pharmacy has helped me find my niche," said Nelson.

Described as a "natural leader" by his professors and classmates, Nelson has held numerous elected positions in state and national student pharmacy organizations. He has been active in community outreach events, including serving in a Career Path Internship for ISU-Meridian/Ada County Community Health Screenings.

In 2012, Nelson participated in an international student exchange program in Kumasi, Ghana. His duties included shadowing clinical pharmacists and physicians during rounds at an 800-bed hospital.

After graduation, Nelson will begin a two-year residency at University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, focusing on the role of pharmacy in primary care and preventive health education.

Outstanding Clinician
As an undergraduate, Sarah Weber intended to major in elementary education. After taking a class in sign language studies, she switched her major to hearing and speech sciences.

"I loved it," she said, noting the personal fulfillment of helping people communicate and connect to the world around them.

Weber, who grew up in Coeur D' Alene, completed a bachelor's degree at Washington State University and enrolled in ISU's audiology doctorate program in 2010. She completed her first two years in Pocatello, her third year in Meridian and the fourth in a clinical externship in Spokane.

A scholar and outstanding clinician, Weber is the recipient of numerous ISU scholarships and honors. In summer 2013, she accompanied ISU audiology faculty on a medical mission to Ecuador where she helped identify hearing loss in hundreds of patients and fit many with hearing aids.

After Weber receives her Doctor of Audiology degree in May, she will begin working as a pediatric audiologist in Pullman, Wash.

University of Pretoria, South Africa, and will start at Idaho State University this fall, has developed a reliable tool that police, forensic pathologists and anthropologists can use to age and sex the remains of unidentified missing children

Forensic anthropologist Kyra Stull, who just earned her doctorate at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and will start at Idaho State University this fall, has developed a reliable tool that police, forensic pathologists and anthropologists can use to age and sex the remains of unidentified missing children.

In the process, she has also compiled the world's largest known sample of children's long bone images. She has developed of the first accurate and reliable technique in the world to estimate the age and sex of children based on skeletal remains.

Stull developed the tool as part of her doctoral research in anatomy at the University of Pretoria. She was conferred her Ph.D. this spring and she will begin as an assistant professor in ISU's anthropology department in August.

Her study is the first to successfully estimate the age and sex of children 12 and younger using an extensive number of measurements and statistical methods. As a next step, a computer software program will be developed that forensic anthropologists and other forensic practitioners can use, according to a press release from the University of Pretoria.

Stull will continue to do similar research while she is at ISU.

"I have already started collecting data in the United States and soon as I get to Idaho I will be applying for grants for me to travel and fund some graduates students to assist me with continuing this type of research," said Stull, who is now living in Austin, Texas. "I think this will be a lifelong project for me."

Scientists generally argue that differences between boys and girls are not fully established in their skeletons until they reach adolescence. Stull has, however, shown that it is indeed possible to accurately and reliably estimate the sex of children 12 and younger by using a large number of measurements from their long bones,including the humerus and femur. She applied statistical models that have yet to be used in anthropology for this purpose.

She obtained skeletal information of 1,380 children from Cape Town's Salt River Forensic Pathology Service and Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital. Stull analyzed Lodox Statscan radiographic images captured from this group of children. The Lodox Statscan is a full-body, low-dosage radiographic machine and is used in trauma units or in forensic laboratories during postmortem examinations.

"The machine was originally designed in South Africa for the diamond mining industry but has since been used in hospitals and morgues worldwide," Stull said.

Her sample is reflective of the South African population, and has led to the development of the first accurate, reliable, and applicable technique in the world to estimate the age and sex of children. Historically, forensic anthropologists could only compare data to antiquated growth studies from North America and Europe.

Stull said estimating age from the skeletal components of a living child is complex, but it is even more difficult when the child is deceased and unknown. The main goal of a forensic anthropological analysis is to establish an accurate biological profile consisting of estimations of sex, age, ancestry and stature of unidentified human remains.

"The biological profile is then used by the police to narrow down the list of missing individuals to ultimately identify the person," Stull said. "Homicide involving children is ubiquitous in all countries and dire improvements are needed to address the accuracy of methods routinely used in forensic anthropology, forensic pathology, and other related fields."

Images such as is obtained through Lodox Statscan are proving to be invaluable, as researchers do not have to rely on actual collected bone samples to build biological profiles.

The title of Stull's doctoral dissertation is "An Osteometric Evaluation of Age and Sex Differences in the Long Bones of South African Children from the Western Cape."

The Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Counseling are offering a stuttering clinic July 26- Aug. 9

The Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Counseling are offering a stuttering clinic July 26- Aug. 9.

The Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders (NWCFD) Interprofessional Intensive Stuttering Clinic (IISC) is a collaborative clinic offered by the Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Counseling at ISU. The clinic's purpose is to provide effective evidence-based fluency treatment that targets outward, overt stuttering along with internal emotions and functional impacts on the clients.

Each client will have one Speech-Language Pathology Graduate student working to target over stuttering using individualized stuttering modification or hybrid approaches to provide the client with strategies to effectively control their stuttering severity. During individual and group sessions, Counseling clinicians will use confidence-building activities, communication skills analysis, and psychoeducational dramas to decrease the negative impact that stuttering has on the individual.

Anyone who stutters and is older than 12 can attend the clinic. The cost is $1,000, and includes food, lodging and materials for the two-week clinic. Scholarships are available based on need. Please contact Dan Hudock at hudock@isu.edu for more information, or visit northwestfluency.org.

Important P-card Reconciliation and Approval Information for Summer Usage

Please remember that if you use your P-card over the summer for research and other ISU work-related expenses, all transactions will still need to be reconciled and approved in the Bank of America Works system weekly. This process becomes especially important in the summer as it impacts ISU's ability to capture our final expenditures and charge them to the department budgets as we prepare the University's annual financial statements for June 30.

The Bank of America Works system is a web based system and can be accessed from off campus. The reconciliation and approval process can take place from any computer you have set up for Web access.

For your convenience ISU has set up a link to the Bank of America Works system on BengalWeb under both the Purchasing and Employee tab. We have also set up a listing of Expense Account Codes that you can refer to on BengalWeb on the Finance tab or on the ISU's main web page at: http://www.isu.edu/finserv/accounting.shtml Commodity/Account Codes, Expense Account Codes.

If you will be unavailable to reconcile or approve P-card transactions for a period of the summer due to field work or travel plans please contact your UBO and/or Ann Merkley in the Purchasing Department to arrange for a "proxy" reconciler or approver for that time period. Ann can be reached at ext. 3112 or by e-mail at merkmarg@isu.edu.

When reconciling and approving P-card transactions in the Bank of America Works system we ask that you do not perform these functions on Tuesday mornings between the hours of 9 and 10:30 a.m. each week. This is the time period when we "download" all purchases from the week before into ISU's Banner Finance system. We need to have a period of time when the Bank of America system is not being used to ensure all transactions can "feed" successfully between the two systems.

Please let me know if you have any questions on this information. I can be reached at extension ext. 3931 or e-mail macldian@isu.edu (Diane MacLerran).

Idaho State University is scheduled to submit its Year Seven Self-Evaluation Report and host a committee of peers for an on-site evaluation Oct. 20-22, at the Pocatello campus as part of its accreditation with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities

Idaho State University is scheduled to submit its Year Seven Self-Evaluation Report and host a committee of peers for an on-site evaluation Oct. 20-22, at the Pocatello campus as part of its accreditation with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU).

The Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities reaffirmed Idaho State University's accreditation on the basis of the Fall 2011 Year One Evaluation. You can find up-to-date information regarding the status of ISU's Year Seven Report as well as previous reports and other information related to accreditation at the following website: http://www.isu.edu/acadaff/accreditation%20resources.shtml. Watch for additional information when you return to campus in the fall.

If you would like further information you may contact Associate Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Selena M. Grace, at gracsele@isu.edu.