News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

April 21, 2014 — Vol. 30 No. 14

Faculty/Staff Updates

The book "The Moral Work of Teaching and Teacher Education: Preparing and Supporting Practitioners," by Matthew Sanger, professor of education at Idaho State University and Richard Osguthorpe, a Boise State University professor, has been honored with three awards

The book "The Moral Work of Teaching and Teacher Education: Preparing and Supporting Practitioners," by Matthew Sanger, professor of education at Idaho State University and Richard Osguthorpe, a Boise State University professor, has been honored with three awards.

The book was published in 2013 and describes morality as a fundamental part of the teaching profession.

It was put on the U.K. Times Higher Education Suggested Reading List for 2013; received the Moral Development and Education SIG (Special Interest Group) Book Award from the American Educational Research Association; and received the Society of Professors Education Book Award for 2014.

Acknowledging the moral nature of teaching allows educators to be more intentional, proactive and aware of the moral messages that are part of their practice, Sanger said. He has been interested in the topic of how to handle morality in education for quite some time. Sanger has focused much of his career, including his graduate work at the University of Michigan, on understanding the topic and its current state of awareness.

With his new book, Sanger adds to what he describes as a currently marginalized literature on the subject. Although the issue of morality in teaching garners little attention in the dominant discourse on education, this book is a step in the right direction.

"We can't avoid it, so let's be intentional about it and do it well," he said.

In education, it is clear that moral issues are part of teaching from kindergarten through university studies, Sanger said. Wherever there is new content to learn, it is necessary to also learn how to integrate it into the surrounding social structure. The moral work of teaching is an integral part of the educational system, but it is seldom acknowledged. That, in part, is the reason for Sanger's book, which was published by the Teachers College Press in New York.

Dr. Jessica Winston, professor of English, recently returned from Shakespeare Association of America, where she was co-leader of a two-hour seminar on law and literature at the Inns of Court

Dr. Jessica Winston, professor of English, recently returned from Shakespeare Association of America, where she was co-leader of a two-hour seminar on law and literature at the Inns of Court, "Inn-wards: Literary-Legal Cultures of the Inns of Court." Professor Winston's co-leader was Virginia Lee Strain, Assistant Professor of English at Loyola University Chicago.

Dr. Curt Whitaker, associate professor of English, presented a paper at the yearly meeting of the Andrew Marvell Society

Dr. Curt Whitaker, associate professor of English, presented his paper "Marvell on Translation: The Cases of Dr. Witty and Mr. Milton" at the yearly meeting of the Andrew Marvell Society, held this year in Tucso. His essay drew from contemporary translation theory to address how Renaissance writers such as Marvell and Milton represent biblical subject matter in English poetry.

Jeff Howard, Ph.D. student, just returned from the Western States Folklore Society annual meeting in Logan, Utah, where he presented a paper

Jeff Howard, Ph.D. student, just returned from the Western States Folklore Society annual meeting in Logan, Utah, where he presented a paper "Translation as 'Cultural Brokering': Applied Folklore, Authenticity, and the Translation of a Foggian Children's Rhyme."

Amy Howard, adjunct instructor in English, just returned from the Western States Folklore Society annual meeting in Logan, Utah, where she presented a paper

Amy Howard, adjunct instructor in English, just returned from the Western States Folklore Society annual meeting in Logan, Utah, where she presented a paper, "'The Strawberries Were So Much Better Then': Nostalgia and Identity Loss in Personal Narratives of Farm Workers."

Dr. Rex Lott of the ISU College of Pharmacy is completing his term as immediate past president of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists

Dr. Rex Lott of the ISU College of Pharmacy is completing his term as immediate past president of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists. Dr. Lott will continue to work closely with CPNP as Vice Chair of the Editorial Board for CPNP's Psychiatric Pharmacotherapy Review Course. The Psychiatric Pharmacotherapy Review Course is used by Board Certified Psychiatric Pharmacists as a continuing education product to help maintain their Board Certification; it is also used as a preparation guide for pharmacists who are planning to take the exam to earn the BCPP (Board Certified Psychiatric Pharmacist) Credential.

Dr. Lott has also been invited to present a talk, "Rational or Irrational: Polypharmacy in Psychiatry", at the upcoming 17th Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona. This talk will be accredited as both pharmacy continuing education and continuing education for maintenance of board certification by psychiatric pharmacists. In the talk, Dr. Lott will evaluate the evidence base and rationale for administration of multiple antipsychotic medications or antidepressant medications to the same patient.

Dr. Terry Ownby, assistant professor of photo media in the James E. Rogers Department of Communication, Media, and Persuasion, is exhibiting his photographic work at a national photographic exhibition this month

Dr. Terry Ownby, assistant professor of photo media in the James E. Rogers Department of Communication, Media, and Persuasion, is exhibiting his photographic work at a national photographic exhibition this month. His photograph "Space-Age Wunderkammer" is on display at The Rourke Art Museum in Moorehead, Minnesota. The exhibition, titled "OF MEMORY, BONE AND MYTH: Fifth Annual National Juried Photography Exhibit," which was sponsored by the University of North Dakota, North Dakota Council of the Arts, and the Minnesota State Arts Board, was juried by eminent digital artist Maggie Taylor.

Dr. Xiaomeng (Mona) Xu, assistant professor of psychology, has had her chapter accepted in the forthcoming Brain Mapping: An Encyclopedia Reference

Dr. Xiaomeng (Mona) Xu, assistant professor of psychology, has had her chapter "The Mesolimbic Dopamine Pathway and Romantic Love" accepted in the forthcoming Brain Mapping: An Encyclopedia Reference to be published by Elsevier and edited by Arthur Toga, M. Marsel Mesulam, and Sabine Kastner.

Stephen Robertson, a graduate student in Experimental Psychology, won the student poster award at the annual meeting of the Four Corners Association for Behavior Analysis

Stephen Robertson, a graduate student in Experimental Psychology, won the student poster award at the annual meeting of the Four Corners Association for Behavior Analysis, Park City, Utah for his poster titled "Effect of High-Fat Diet on Demand for Food." This poster was co-authored with Steven Boomhower, a recent graduate of ISU, and Dr. Erin Rasmussen, a psychology faculty member.

Articles in the April issue of Dimensions of Dental Hygiene

The following articles appeared in the April issue of Dimensions of Dental Hygiene:

Power Instrumentation Considerations by Tara Johnson, RDH, PhD
Create the Informed Dental Patient, a special supplement by Jacqueline Freudenthal, RDH, MHE
Face the Threat by Kandis Garland, RDH, MS

News Bites

The Idaho Museum of Natural History's online, 3-D collections in the Idaho Virtualization Laboratory are featured in the May 2014 National Geographic Magazine, Volume 222, No. 5

The Idaho Museum of Natural History's online, 3-D collections in the Idaho Virtualization Laboratory are featured in the May 2014 National Geographic Magazine, Volume 222, No. 5.

The magazine article features a large photo of Bison Bob, a 36,000-year old Ice Age steppe bison from the University of Alaska Museum of the North and smaller photos of other museum specimens that are part of the IMNH's online repository of archaeological and fossil scans "including everything from ancient Helicoprion sharks to bows and arrows."

The more than 15,000 bones and artifacts that have been scanned are 360-degree images that can be better examined by rolling, flipping and zooming in on them by computer users.

"We're pleased that National Geographic Magazine has chosen to feature our online repository of scans and images. This recognizes the quality and value of work, and expands our reach to more audiences," said Herb Maschner, IMNH director.

National Geographic Magazine notes that, according to Maschner, the IMNH's efforts to create the online repository "is a move to democratize science and preserve fragile specimens."

The one-page feature is located in the May National Geographic Magazine's Next Section that begins on page 17.

To view IMNH Idaho Virtualization Laboratory scans, visit ivl.imnh.isu.edu.

Idaho State University is partnering with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare to conduct a baseline study on primary care providers' use of team-based care, referral patterns, and electronic health records for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension

Idaho State University is partnering with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (DHW) to conduct a baseline study on primary care providers' use of team-based care, referral patterns, and electronic health records (EHR) for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension.

Nearly 1,000 individual providers and practices across Idaho will be invited to participate in an online survey. A summary of survey results will be available by June 30.

Organizations partnering with ISU and DHW for this project include the Idaho Medical Association, the Idaho Academy of Family Physicians, the Idaho Primary Care Association, and St. Luke's Health System. Resolution Research, a Denver-based multi-method survey research firm with experience conducting diabetes and heart disease-specific surveys, will work closely with ISU and DHW to deliver this important survey.

Results from this baseline survey will be used to develop plans to promote prevention, early detection and treatment of chronic diseases in Idaho.

Diabetes and hypertension, while harmful on their own, are also risk factors for other chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, end-stage renal disease, peripheral artery disease, and blindness. Primary care is the first point of entry into the health care system for many patients, and prevention and/or early detection can improve patients' health, reduce chronic disease rates, and lower health care costs.

The Idaho State University Holocaust Memorial Lecture "From a Name to a Number" by Philip Mandel will be presented May 1 at 6 p.m. in the Idaho State University Student Union Ballroom

The Idaho State University Holocaust Memorial Lecture "From a Name to a Number" by Philip Mandel will be presented May 1 at 6 p.m. in the Idaho State University Student Union Ballroom.

The free, public lecture is being held to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust and to explore the ways in which they are remembered. The lecture is sponsored by the ISU Department of History, Women Studies Program and Cultural Events Committee.

Mandel, the son of Austrian refugees who fled from the Nazis, embodies this theme. Mandel's interest in the Holocaust moved him to become involved in documenting the life of one of its survivors and the topic of the lecture, Alter Wiener, whose autobiography is currently being produced as a feature-length documentary. Signed copies of Wiener's book will be available.

This free public gathering will coincide with the National Days of Remembrance, coordinated by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. "Confronting the Holocaust: American Responses" will be the theme for 2014.

For more information, contact event coordinators Justin Dolan Stover at stovjust@isu.edu or Tyffnee Stewart at stewtyff@isu.edu.

The Idaho State University Electrical Engineering and College of Science and Engineering are organizing a research symposium focusing on wireless communications to be held May 15-16 at the Center for Higher Education in Idaho Falls

The Idaho State University Electrical Engineering and College of Science and Engineering are organizing a research symposium focusing on wireless communications to be held May 15-16 at the Center for Higher Education in Idaho Falls.

The symposium will include six single-track research sessions, technical panels that reflect state-of-the-art research, key solutions needed for advancement of spectrum-using technologies and an optional visit to the 890-square mile Idaho National Laboratory outdoor Wireless National User Facility. Advance registration is required to participate in the optional tour.

Papers and panel proposals are being accepted for the symposium. The papers should be written in standard IEEE format, contain descriptions of work that is new, significant and relevant to the purpose of the symposium, be written in English and be a maximum of 10 pages.

Papers will be reviewed and selected based on originality, relevance, clarity, validity of method and adherence to the submission guidelines. Papers that are selected will be presented during one of the six NWRCS 2014 sessions. At least one author of each paper is expected to register and attend the symposium.

Papers will be accepted until mid-April. Panel proposals will be presented at one of the six sessions either orally or in a poster. Panel proposers may also submit an up to two-page abstract for the panels.

The symposium is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho State University, The Eastern Idaho Engineering Council, Idaho Academy of Science and potentially other professional and technical societies including IEEE, industry, academia and federal agencies. Industry participants are invited to sponsor the symposium. Sponsorship details can be found in the symposium website.

The general chairs for this event are Daniel Devasirvatham, INL, and Hossein Mousavinezhad, Idaho State University. The organizing committee consists of Jodi Grgich, Logistics Coordinator, Jodi.Grgich@inl.gov, Becky Wray, ISU-Idaho Falls Academic Programs, wrayrebe@isu.edu, and Shaleena Jaison, paper and panel coordinator, jaisshal@isu.edu.

Petar Dimov, an Idaho State University senior in mechanical engineering, is the recipient of the Ann Hunter Scholarship from the ISU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi honor society for spring 2014

Petar Dimov, an Idaho State University senior in mechanical engineering, is the recipient of the Ann Hunter Scholarship from the ISU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi honor society for spring 2014.

The Ann Hunter Scholarship provides a full semester of in-state tuition to a student who embodies the application of Phi Kappa Phi honor society's motto, "The Love of Learning," in his or her academic career.

Dimov was born in Bulgaria and attended high school in England before coming to ISU. In his application essay, Dimov discusses how his experiences living in three countries have expanded his interests in broadening his horizons and have given him renewed appreciation for how much is yet to be learned. He hopes to continue his education after graduate with the goal of completing his Ph.D. and teaching in a university setting. Dimov will read his scholarship-winning essay at Phi Kappa Phi's annual induction ceremony at Juniper Hills Country Club on May 1.

Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. ISU's chapter promotes the love of learning through a variety of activities each year, including a fall scholarly lecture at the Portneuf Valley Brewery, running a program to collect children's books for young students in our community, and sponsoring a GRE/GMAT preparation session for undergraduate students interested in pursuing graduate school.

For more information, please see the organization's web site at http://www.isu.edu/phikphi/ or contact organization President Michael Rowe at rowemicha@gmail.com.

The final Colloquium on Narrative this year, featuring Dr. Jeremy Thomas and Karee Garvin in the Department of Anthropology, is Friday, April 25

The final Colloquium on Narrative this year, featuring Dr. Jeremy Thomas and Karee Garvin in the Department of Anthropology, is Friday, April 25 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in LA 324.

For the final gathering of the year, the Colloquium presents Dr. Jeremy Thomas from the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice, and Karee Garvin, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology. Questions, answers, and in-depth discussion follow the presentations. The proceedings will be hosted by Dr. Paul Sivitz from the Department of History.

The Colloquium on Narrative features scholars from the College of Arts and Letters offering presentations on the use of narrative in their own work. Graduate student presentations are welcomed (and encouraged). Only a couple slots remain for Fall 2014 meetings, but there are plenty left for Spring 2015.

Contact Dr. Paul Sivitz at sivipaul@isu.edu if you would like to present at future colloquia or with any questions.

Idaho State University School of Nursing Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International - Theta Upsilon Chapter, will host its 2014 Induction Ceremony on April 29

Idaho State University School of Nursing Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International - Theta Upsilon Chapter, will host its 2014 Induction Ceremony in the Pond Student Union Building - Salmon River Room on April 29 at 6 p.m. The keynote speaker is Dr. Dan Ordyna, CEO of Portneuf Medical Center.

The Office for Research and Economic Development hosted an ID Unmanned Aircraft Systems Working Group meeting April 4

The Office for Research and Economic Development hosted an ID Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Working Group meeting April 4. The group's members are from across the state.

Shaped by Idaho's innovation and multi-faceted expertise, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) industry is expected to become an 89 billion dollar industry in the next 15 years. From the Idaho National Laboratory's established facilities and leadership efforts in UAS operations to the wide-ranging research and development capabilities of Idaho's colleges and universities, Idaho has a legacy of contributing to this emerging field and the capabilities to further strengthen its role.

UAS is also reshaping a number of Idaho services and industries. Public safety. Disaster response. Agriculture. Environmental monitoring. These are a few of the public and private benefits of unmanned aircraft already being put to use across the state.

The group toured RISE, Idaho Accelerator Center and the College of Technology's Robotics program. Dr. Donna Delparte, Department of Geosciences gave a short presentation titled "Precision Agriculture Using UAS."

The Department of Biological Sciences Open House and Research Symposium will be Wednesday, April 30

The Department of Biological Sciences Open House and Research Symposium will be Wednesday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the foyer of the Gale Life Science Building.

This event will feature research poster presentations by ISU biology faculty members and their students.

Refreshments will be provided.