News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 25, 2014 — Vol. 30 No. 10

Faculty/Staff Updates

Dr. Xiaomeng (Mona) Xu, assistant professor of psychology, has had her article "An fMRI study of nicotine-deprived smokers' reactivity to smoking cues during novel/exciting activity" accepted into PLoS ONE

Dr. Xiaomeng (Mona) Xu, assistant professor of psychology, has had her article "An fMRI study of nicotine-deprived smokers' reactivity to smoking cues during novel/exciting activity" accepted into PLoS ONE and her article "The synergistic effects of anxiety and cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive dysfunction in older adults with cardiovascular disease" accepted into the Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology.

Dr. Thomas Klein, Professor in the Department of English and Philosophy, will hold his post-sabbatical colloquium, "'I Flew with Birds, Dove Under Waves': Water and Spirit in Early Medieval Riddles," on Friday, April 4.

Dr. Thomas Klein, Professor in the Department of English and Philosophy, will hold his post-sabbatical colloquium, "'I Flew with Birds, Dove Under Waves': Water and Spirit in Early Medieval Riddles," on Friday, April 4 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Liberal Arts 256.

This colloquium presentation began with a mystery-what is the solution to a five-line poetic riddle in Old English that has stumped scholars and students for 150 years? The Anglo-Saxon riddles are celebrated both for their elaborate strategies of obfuscation and for their lyrical reconfigurations of the known world, but this riddle has proven especially elusive and evocative.

As the presentation will show, the riddle in question seems to have tapped into a tradition of riddles beginning in the late Classical world and extending to Early Modern England and beyond, in which forms of water are metaphorically presented as mothers, daughters, fathers, and sons that give birth and are born from each other in complicated, gender-shifting permutations. At the same time, the riddle appears to cloak its solution in a secondary, metaphorical layer, an evocation of the Holy Spirit. The connection between water and the spirit demonstrated in the riddle and elsewhere reflects the early medieval understanding of "the hidden likeness of things."

The Department of English and Philosophy is pleased to announce a special guest presentation by Henrik Gyllstad, senior lecturer in English Linguistics at the Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Sweden.

The Department of English and Philosophy is pleased to announce a special guest presentation by Henrik Gyllstad, senior lecturer in English Linguistics at the Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Sweden. Dr. Gyllstad's research focuses on Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing, with a recent emphasis on lexical processing in a second language, validation of vocabulary tests, and syntactic complexity in texts written by learners of English. His talk is titled "Looking at the midfield and left wing of a phraseology continuum: Native and non-native speaker processing of English collocations and free combinations" and will be held in L.A. 256 on Monday, 7 April, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Please see an abstract of the talk below.

Research on processing of word combinations has traditionally focused on idioms. In this presentation, I will report on a study investigating whether native speaker (NS) and non-native speaker (NNS) processing of English word combinations that are partly semantically non-compositional but not fully-fledged idioms - collocations - come with a processing cost compared to word combinations where the component words appear in literal core meanings - free combinations. The results of the experiment showed that there was a processing cost for collocations compared to free combinations, both for NS and NNS participants. However, there was no statistically significant difference between these two groups. These findings are discussed in the light of descriptive models of word combinations, and implications for word combination representation and retrieval in the bilingual mental lexicon are presented.

Mary Anne Hales Reynolds PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Nursing has recently attended a two day course on end-of-life care in Glendale, California.

Mary Anne Hales Reynolds PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Nursing has recently attended a two day course on end-of-life care in Glendale, California.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and City of Hope (COH), received a funded grant from the National Cancer Institute to develop and implement the curriculum.

Dr. Reynolds was one of 40 nurses competitively selected from across the United States to attend this DNP-Palliative Oncology Care program.

News Bites

Interested in being a part of Staff Council or know someone who you think would make a great addition?

Interested in being a part of Staff Council or know someone who you think would make a great addition? It is nomination time of year and we are looking for enthusiastic individuals to get involved.

You may only nominate someone from the employee group to which you belong. You may also nominate yourself. Please contact the nominee before submitting his/her name to confirm the nomination will be accepted.

The last day to nominate an individual is by 5 p.m. on Friday, March 28.

Send your nomination to Heidi Oliver at olivheid@isu.edu.

Elections will be held on Monday, April 7 and Tuesday April 8. Voting will take place in BengalWeb.

CLASSIFIED GROUPS
Clerical/Secretarial-4 openings
Other Professional-1 opening
Service/Maintenance-2 openings
Skilled Crafts-No openings available for nominations, all positions are currently filled.
Technical/Paraprofessional-1 opening

NON CLASSIFIED GROUPS
Group I Instruction & Academic Support-3 openings
Group II Student Services- no openings available
Group III Office of Finance & Administration-1 opening
Group IV Auxiliary Enterprises & Institutional Support-1 opening

Although the "guns on campus" bill was signed into law in Idaho on March 12, the law does not go into effect until July 1 on the Idaho State University and other public university campuses.

Although the "guns on campus" bill was signed into law in Idaho on March 12, the law does not go into effect until July 1 on the Idaho State University and other public university campuses.

"We want to remind the university community and the public that ISU's policies regarding firearms will not change until July 1," said Steve Chatterton, ISU director of public safety. "Until that time firearms are not allowed anywhere on campus except when carried by a law enforcement officer, authorized security guard or others authorized by the director of public safety."

ISU and the State Board of Education are in the process of working to develop policies and security measures that will take effect when the bill becomes law on July 1. After that date ISU's policy on restricting firearms on campus will change only for people who hold an Idaho enhanced concealed carry permit or retired law enforcement officers who hold a concealed carry permit issued according to Idaho Code, Chatterton said.

"Training and explanatory materials regarding the new law will be made available to members of the ISU community and the public as they are finalized," said Adrienne King, director of ISU marketing and communications.

For information on ISU's current firearms policy visit www.isu.edu/pubsafe/policy_menu.shtml.

The spring months and warmer temperatures are a perfect time to get a handle on your health.

The spring months and warmer temperatures are a perfect time to get a handle on your health. If you are an adult without health insurance or limited access to medical care, attend a free Community Health Screening event Thursday, April 10, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Boys and Girls Club of Ada County, 610 E. 42nd Street, in Garden City.

Faculty and student clinicians from the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center will administer the services, including flu shots and other basic screening services.

Services include:

The full screening process takes about 90 minutes, and patients in immediate need are given appointments at low-cost Treasure Valley clinics for additional care.

You don't have to make an appointment to attend the April 10 screening. Valley Ride bus stops are nearby. For more information, call 373-1700 or email healthyU@isu.edu.

The Community Health Screening Program has served more than 700 adults since it began in March 2010. It's sponsored by Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

Idaho State University seniors Matea Ivanovic and Kendra Doty secured a slot at the 68th National Debate Tournament (NDT) at the University of Indiana, Bloomington, later this month by earning a second-place finish at NDT District II competition hosted at ISU this March.

Idaho State University seniors Matea Ivanovic and Kendra Doty secured a slot at the 68th National Debate Tournament (NDT) at the University of Indiana, Bloomington, later this month by earning a second-place finish at NDT District II competition hosted at ISU this March.

At this qualifying tournament the ISU duo representing the James M. & Sharon E. Rupp Debate Society bested five of six opponents. The tournament hosted 14 teams from five western states.

In addition to their second-place finish, Ivanovic earned another first-place speaker award, while Doty was recognized as the fifth-best speaker at the tournament.

Ivanovic and Doty as a team have had one of the strongest seasonal showings for ISU in years. They won both the Gonzaga University and Weber State University tournaments. They were also in elimination debates at other major tournaments such as Wake Forest University and the University of North Texas.

The seniors have proven to be a force to be recognized because they have one of the highest seasonal win percentages in the nation. At 71.7 percent, Ivanovic and Doty have the 12th highest win percentage in the nation according to tabroom.com.

Their elimination debate percentage of 81.8 percent is the sixth highest in the nation, also according to tabroom.com. This places them above teams from Georgetown, George Mason, the University of Michigan, the United States Military Academy, James Madison, Wake Forest, Emory and many others.

Overall, the NDT-CEDA debate circuit boasts 159 participating institutions and 1,813 students competing in 71 tournaments so far in the 2013-2014 debate season.

"These two women work so hard. They have had so much success this season and I could not be more proud," said ISU assistant debate coach Roger Copenhaver. "Their success at districts this weekend only highlights a small piece of excellence that these two women continue to exemplify."

The team's success doesn't come by accident, said Sarah T. Partlow Lefevre, director of the James M. & Sharon E. Rupp Debate Society.

"This team's competitive success is a direct result of the massive effort they have invested into debate activities," Partlow Lefevre. "I am proud to see them develop such sharp strategic vision and stellar research skills."

While other ISU students are looking forward to spring break, Ivanovic and Doty are getting ready to attend nationals. Over the course of 12 days, the team will debate at both the largest intercollegiate policy debate championship (CEDA) and at the qualification-only intercollegiate national championship, the National Debate Tournament (NDT). Both tournaments are hosted by the University of Indiana, Bloomington.

During spring break most students will get the chance to relax and take a break from school. This is not the case for Ivanovic and Doty, who will be competing during 12- to 14-hour days as they seek the ultimate prize, a national championship, Partlow Lefevre said.

According to Partlow Lefevre, ISU previously took third place at the CEDA Championship in 2006. ISU has also claimed speaker awards as high as second at both the 2007 NDT and 2007 CEDA in the past.

"Talent alone can't ensure a big win at nationals," Partlow Lefevre said. "It also requires a certain amount of luck. But, this team certainly has the necessary talent."

Idaho State University's "A Season of Note" will present American jazz artist Chris Botti on April 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the Stephens Performing Art Center's Jensen Grand Concert Hall.

Idaho State University's "A Season of Note" will present American jazz artist Chris Botti on April 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the Stephens Performing Art Center's Jensen Grand Concert Hall.

Jazz instrumentalist Chris Botti has won several Gold, Platinum and Grammy Awards since the start of his career in 1995. Botti has had four No. 1 Jazz Albums and has become a genre-of-one because of his ability to stay in the realm of contemporary Jazz while still garnering the attention of pop music fans.

Botti has become the world's best-selling American jazz instrumentalist artist. He has collaborated and performed with many other artists over the years including Paul Simon, Aretha Franklin, Natalie Cole, Bette Midler, Joni Mitchell, Natalie Merchant, Scritti Politti, Roger Daltrey and several others. Botti has also had the distinguished honor of performing at the White House for the President of China.

Ticket prices are $42, $49 and $59. Tickets can be purchased at the Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office, open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the school year. The Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office is open one hour prior to show times.

Tickets can also be purchased over the phone at (208) 282-3595 or online at www.isu.edu/tickets. They can also be purchased at Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello or Idaho Falls and at the Pond Student Union Building. The Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office is open one hour prior to show times.

For more information on this artist visit www.chrisbotti.com.

The Idaho State University National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC) program recently hosted the first local cyber competition on the ISU campus.

The Idaho State University National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC) program recently hosted the first local cyber competition on the ISU campus.

Universities and high schools from around the Idaho and Utah participated in the competition, titled the NIATEC Cyber Defense Competition. NIATEC intends to continue the series in the future and expand its scope.

Six teams competed for scholarship prizes. Brigham Young University and Brigham Young University-Idaho each brought two teams, and the ISU College of Technology and North Ridge High School, Layton, Utah, also brought teams. The Northridge team was a finalist in the national CyberPatriot computer security competition.

This cyber defense competition was comprised of a red team, blue team and white team. The blue team was comprised of the visiting student teams trying to defend their systems from cyber-attacks completed by the red team, which was comprised of NIATEC alumni who work in computer security for the United States government. The white team was comprised of current ISU NIATEC students who created the virtual environment and entire competition from scratch.

Student competitors came to the ISU College of Business at 7:30 a.m. and stayed until early evening to compete on the day of the competition.

ISU NIATEC graduate students developed the hardware, software and system used by the teams in the competition.

"The NIATEC students were impatient for the opportunity to use their innovative design," said Corey Schou, director of ISU Informatics Research Institute and associate dean of the College of Business, "The wait paid off for everyone, and the competition worked successfully. The design gave each team a set of virtual computers and networks composed of 12 systems that they could manipulate through the Internet."

"The NIATEC students worked very hard to put on this competition," Schou said. "We had to come together as a team to be able execute the plan and have everything ready in time. The NIATEC team is pleased with results. The competitors and their sponsor were impressed with the learning experience and had fun at the same time."

The funding for this event and its scholarship prizes came from a competitive grant awarded to ISU by the National Security Agency. (ISC)2, the largest security professional certifying organization, donated more than $100,000 in network equipment to make the competition possible. The grant was authored by James Frost, an ISU assistant research professor.

The National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC) has a mission to provide outstanding academic opportunities that develop educated workers for government, academia, and industry for its group of MBA students who are emphasizing in Information Assurance. As part of the program, students receive paid tuition, books, anda monthly stipend in exchange for two years of service to their country. In most cases, students serve in the federal government to help protect critical infrastructure and our nation's valued systems.

Idaho State University English Major Morgan Heeder was recently accepted by the Andes and Amazon Field School to study traditional medical practices and beliefs in the Amazon.

Idaho State University English Major Morgan Heeder was recently accepted by the Andes and Amazon Field School to study traditional medical practices and beliefs in the Amazon.

She will be studying in Iyarina, Ecuador. She will take classes in Quechua language while learning more in the field of linguistic methodology. She leaves the end of May and returns in August.

Amazonian Ecuador is linguistically diverse. Important work on the under-studied languages of Ecuador has begun, but there is still considerable work to do, according to school administrators. Heeder will have opportunities to network with scholars from the United States and Ecuador so she can gain a deeper understanding of her linguistic discipline through its practice in a foreign setting.

This is not Heeder's first experience in Ecuador. She went to Ecuador in 2009 to do volunteer work in a children's hospital and to learn Spanish. While there, she learned that Spanish was not the first language in Ecuador, it was Quechua. "The order of language in Ecuador is Quecha, Spanish, and English. I learned the languages in the reverse order," said Heeder.

Heeder enjoyed the culture so much that she wanted to return. About a year and a half ago, she started looking for exchange schools that would take her back to Ecuador. ISU's exchange program does not extend to Ecuador so she chose to go through BYU for this program. She joins approximately 60 students from universities throughout the United States.

Heeder will take classes in Quechua language along with other classes and earn up to 12 credits while there. Students stay in school housing while there.

"I will be staying in the jungle in huts that are connected by walkways. They use walkways because it is not safe to walk on the ground because of snakes and other things that crawl around," she said.

The school staff provides the students with three meals daily and Heeder says the food is amazing. The program cost is $8,000, which includes housing and meals. She is paying this without any help but feels it is worth the experience.

Heeder graduates from ISU May 2015 and plans to go to graduate school in Linguistics. She is looking at University of Texas in Austin and New York University.

"There are a lot of opportunities for travel and education out there for people to take advantage of and they should take advantage if they can," Heeder says.