News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

November 4, 2013 — Vol. 29 No. 36

Faculty/Staff Updates

Dr. Jessica Winston, Professor of English, who delivered a paper, "Literature and the 'Professional' Culture of the Early Modern Inns of Court," at the annual meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference

Dr. Jessica Winston, Professor of English, who delivered a paper, "Literature and the 'Professional' Culture of the Early Modern Inns of Court," at the annual meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference, held Oct. 24-27 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She was also be present for the awarding of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference Literature Prize for best literature paper published annually in the society's journal Sixteenth Century Studies, for which she serves on the awards committee. Dr. Amanda Zink, Assistant.Professor of English, recently returned from the Western Literature Association Conference at Berkeley, where she presented a paper, "The Dreamy Idyllic Atmosphere of Southern California: Cross-Racial Feminine Affiliations in the Novels of Maria Amparo Ruiz dfe Burton and Evelyn Hunt Raymond." Dr. Alan Johnson, Professor of English, represented the department at the Rocky Mountain MLA meeting in Vancouver, Washington, where he delivered a paper, "Landscapes of Terror in Indian and Pakistani Literature and Film" and participated in the panel "Developing Your Professional Career."

Associate Professor Philip A. Homan presented two invited programs at the 2013 Wild West History Association Roundup in Boise on July 11

Associate Professor Philip A. Homan presented two invited programs at the 2013 Wild West History Association Roundup in Boise on July 11. Sponsored by the Idaho Humanities Council Speakers Bureau, the slide presentations, entitled "Queen of Diamonds: Kittie Wilkins, Horse Queen of Idaho, and the Wilkins Horse Company" and "Powder Face: The Horse That Robbed the Winnemucca Bank," narrated the career of the Idaho Horse Queen.

Wilkins ran the largest herd of horses owned by one family in the American West. She also made the largest horse sale in the West, supplying over ten percent of all the horses sent from the United States to South Africa for the Boer War from 1899 to 1902, according to statistics from the British Remount Department. Her biweekly roundup of over 500 horses on her range in Owyhee County for that sale provided the perfect cover for the robbery of the general store in the remote Idaho ranching community of Three Creek in September 1900 for provisions for the getaway from the holdup of the First National Bank in Winnemucca, Nevada, by Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Wilkins's saddle horse was also stolen to use in the bank holdup. After the holdup, the horse was given to a boy near Winnemucca by Cassidy.

Homan's peer-reviewed article "The Sundance Kid Didn't Do It-The Winnemucca Bank Robbery Confession and the Three Creek Store: A Review of the Evidence" was published in the October issue of the WWHA's Journal. Homan provides evidence that the Sundance Kid's confession of the robbery of the Three Creek store and the Winnemucca bank, discovered in a Buenos Aires, Argentina, newspaper by a British scholar in the British Library-the truth of which current research on Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, and the Winnemucca bank robbery has taken for granted-is a forgery.

The WWHA was formed in 2008 by the merger of the Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association, founded in 1990, with the National Association for Outlaw and Lawman History, founded in 1974 at Utah State University in part by the family of Butch Cassidy and the boy to whom Cassidy gave Wilkins's horse. With international membership, the WWHA is the premier scholarly association for the preservation of the history of the Wild Bunch and other outlaws.

Homan is Instruction Librarian at the Eli M. Oboler Library.

Matthew Sanger, professor of education at Idaho State University, recently collaborated on a book with Richard E. Osguthorpe, a Boise State University professor

Matthew Sanger, professor of education at Idaho State University, recently collaborated on a book with Richard E. Osguthorpe, a Boise State University professor. "The Moral Work of Teaching and Teacher Education: Preparing and Supporting Practitioners," describes morality as a fundamental part of the teaching profession.

"The most common set of motivations or reasons why teachers become teachers are fundamentally moral in nature. If you ask teachers, 'Why are you going to be a teacher?' it's consistently altruistic," said Sanger.

The topic of morality in education might conjure thoughts of days in kindergarten. Kids learn they are not islands, and are introduced to the rules of reciprocity. In education, it is clear that the lessons of morality do not end in kindergarten, high school or even college. Wherever there is new content to learn, it is necessary to also learn how to integrate it into the surrounding social structure.

As children grow, school provides them with a scale model of society. In school, students learn what is appropriate, acceptable and expected in how they behave. They also learn that those expectations ebb and flow with changes in audience and environment. These teachings are an integral part of education even at a college level.

However, the topic is not commonly addressed. It exists in the education system, yet is seldom acknowledged. That, in part, is the reason for Sanger's book.

"It doesn't matter if you place value on moral education. If you're a teacher in a class, you're engaged in it," said Sanger.

Acknowledging morality in education allows educators to be more intentional, proactive and aware of the moral messages that are part of their teaching style and content.

Sanger has been interested in the topic of how to handle morality in education for quite some time. He has focused much of his career, including his graduate work at the University of Michigan, on understanding the topic and its current state of awareness.

With his new book, Sanger adds to what he describes as a very thin literature on the subject. Although the issue of morality in teaching garners little attention, this book is a step in the right direction.

"We can't avoid it, so let's be intentional about it and do it well," he said.

Idaho State University's Meridian campus has a new assistant professor of nursing, Susan Tavernier

Idaho State University's Meridian campus has a new assistant professor of nursing, Susan Tavernier. She is also the campus's new Accelerated Nursing Program coordinator.

Tavernier received her Ph.D. in Nursing from the University of Utah, where she went on to complete a two-year post-doctoral fellowship. Previously, Tavernier worked as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Oncology. She has prior connections to ISU, including as a preceptor for graduate student research and member of a thesis committee at the ISU-Meridian campus. A longtime resident of Boise, Tavernier joined the ISU nursing faculty because, she said, "ISU is a recognized leader of nursing and research in Idaho. The implementation of the Ph.D. in Nursing degree program brings new opportunities for nurses and faculty to collaborate and contribute to the art and science of our profession."

Recent research of Tavernier's includes findings published in the October 2013 issue of "Psycho-Oncology." Titled "Diffusion of a Distress Management Guideline into practice," the paper showed what organizational and nursing barriers hinder and predict the adoption of the practice guideline. The Distress Management guideline has been in place since 1999 but has seen problems with its adoption into medical care.

The Distress Management Guideline recommends that patients with cancer be screened for distress and subsequently referred if their level of distress crosses a certain threshold.

"The majority of nurses studied were unaware of the guideline itself. Those who were aware identified multiple barriers that need to be addressed before it can be sufficiently adopted," said Tavernier.

She said the study was timely because the American College of Surgeons now requires distress screening for cancer patients.

The study was funded by a Translational Research Grant from the Oncology Nursing Society Foundation through a charitable donation by Sanofi-Aventis, USA.

Tavernier's other work includes a November presentation of the results of a pilot study titled, "Development and testing of an electronic individualized quality of life tool." The study builds upon her doctoral dissertation findings and is the subject of an NIH R21 grant on patient-provider communication, pending a delayed review in November due to the government shutdown.

Dr. Howard Gauthier recently published a book titled, "Execute for Success: Eight Principles for Achieving Success in Business and Life"

As a young college basketball coach nearly 30 years ago, Dr. Howard Gauthier thought long and hard about how team members can properly execute their skills and reduce turnovers.

"I wondered what are the skills, strategies and tactics teams or individuals use to execute their activities so they achieve success," said Gauthier, an associate professor of athletic administration at Idaho State University-Meridian.

That question planted the seed for a book Gauthier has just published, titled Execute for Success: Eight Principles for Achieving Success in Business and Life.

Drawing from his research and 30 years of coaching, teaching and administrative experience, Gauthier explores strategies designed to help people from all walks of life reduce their mistakes and improve performance.

The eight principles are outlined in the form of a model that presents the reader with stories and research from the sports and business worlds, psychology, medicine and politics. Throughout the book, readers learn why passion for an activity is important in executing for success, but why passion alone is not enough, explains Gauthier.

The book stresses the importance of determination and the need for establishing clear and challenging goals. Readers are introduced to research from cognitive psychology that helps explain how people develop skills.

Gauthier relates stories from the sports and music worlds to show the importance of deliberate practice and draws upon business experts to illustrate why discipline is so important when performing an activity. He also cites research from America's hospitals to help explain why eliminating distractions is critical for effective execution.

Published Oct. 9 by Sports Leadership Publishing Co., the 164-page book is receiving high marks from national coaches and business leaders.

"Howard finds a way to reach anyone striving to advance in any aspect of their life. Reading this book is a must for any team, individual or organization seeking success," writes Bo Ryan, head men's basketball coach at University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Jim Nieters, a senior director at Hewlett-Packard, writes, "In Execute for Success, Howard conveys with clarity and precision how anybody can become the best at what they do. Though his model is simple, it is also profound, and I'm convinced that anybody who follows it diligently will more readily reach their full potential."

Execute for Success is available on Amazon.com and Gauthier's website www.execute4success.com.

Gauthier is also the author of Getting Hired in College Sports, a step-by-step process to assist students, sports managers, coaches and administrators in their job search. It's currently being used in approximately 45 sports management programs across the country.

Gauthier is a former athletic director at California State University at Monterey Bay, Idaho State University, and Southwest Minnesota State University. He has coached basketball at Southern Illinois University, Roanoke College, Whitworth University and Eastern Oregon University, and served on various Big Sky Conference and NCAA committees.

For more information, contact Gauthier at (208) 373-1753 or gauthowa@isu.edu.

Kandis Garland has published an educational supplement in Dimensions of Dental Hygiene with three papers

Kandis Garland, Associate Professor in the Department of Dental Hygiene, has published an educational supplement in Dimensions of Dental Hygiene (September issue, 2013) with three papers: "Safeguard Your Health," "An In-depth Look at Latex," and "The Benefits of Nitrile."

News Bites

Idaho Central Credit Union recently donated four large communication screens to the College of Business building

Idaho Central Credit Union (ICCU) recently donated four large communication screens to the College of Business building. The screens rotate messages about market news, student activities, upcoming events, and College of Business (COB) accomplishments.

Students, faculty, and staff are enjoying the benefits. Students will have the opportunity to utilize the screens and the content sharing system for a variety class projects.

"The screens are great tools for communication, news, messaging, and strengthening the COB community. ICCU has been very generous to the university. We feel fortunate to have such an engaged partner with the College," said COB Dean Tom Ottaway.

The credit union donated the screens to help promote student organizations and university activities and to give students an opportunity to develop their design talents.

ICCU's Chief Financial Officer, Brian Berrett, commented, "ICCU is grateful for the relationship we have with ISU. Many of ICCU's employees are graduates from the College of Business, and we feel it is important to give back to the local university that has provided us with such educated and engaged team members."

The Idaho State University Office of Alumni Relations and ISU Alumni Association will induct five new members into its Sports Hall of Fame on Saturday, Nov. 9

The Idaho State University Office of Alumni Relations and ISU Alumni Association will induct five new members into its Sports Hall of Fame on Saturday, Nov. 9.

The new members include Edward E. Smith, Fairfield, Idaho, baseball, 1970-73; Nancy Espeseth, Blackfoot, softball and basketball 1980-84; Telly K. Lockette, Miami, Fla., footbal 1995-97; Jackie Poulson (deceased), Blackfoot, track and field 1999-2003; and James H. "Byrd" Yizar, Pocatello, Lifetime Achievement Award.

The induction ceremony at noon Nov. 9 in the Rogers Black Box Theatre in the Stephens Performing Arts Center is open to the public. The new inductees will be introduced at halftime of that afternoon's ISU football game against Portland State University, which kicks off at 3:05 p.m.

Biographies of the inductees follow:

The College of Education's Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society is hosting a children and youth literature book fair Nov. 11-15

The College of Education's Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society is hosting a children and youth literature book fair Nov. 11-15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Rendezvous Gallery Room.

You can also order books online at http://bookfairs.scholastic.com/bookfairs/cptoolkit/homepage.do?method=homepage&url=isu.

The second in a series of six Community Health screenings is Thursday, Nov. 7, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 950 W. State St., Boise

The second in a series of six Community Health screenings is Thursday, Nov. 7, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 950 W. State St., Boise. Free services will include:

The free Community Health Screening Program began in March 2010, thanks to a partnership between the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

Approximately 650 adults have been screened to date, with many referred to low-cost clinics and doctors for further treatment. Screening services are provided by ISU-Meridian health professions students and clinical faculty.

"Often when citizens in our community are uninsured and can't afford preventive health care, they seek medical care in emergency rooms as a last resort," said Ada County Commission Chairman Dave Case. "This can end up costing taxpayers a lot of money, so our goal with this program is to provide a resource for people to turn to as a preventive measure, in an effort to ultimately help reduce costs to the county and to our taxpayers for funding Indigent Services programs."

"Prevention is a crucial piece of health care, and our mission with these screening events is to identify individuals at risk of preventable diseases," said Dr. Glenda Carr, an ISU-Meridian assistant clinical pharmacy professor and co-director of the Health Screening Program.

The full screening process takes about an hour. No appointment is necessary. Valley Ride bus stops are nearby. For more information, call 373-1700 or email healthyU@isu.edu.

Idaho State University's A Season of Note will present Idaho Opera in "The Marriage of Figaro" Saturday, Nov. 14

Idaho State University's A Season of Note will present Idaho Opera in "The Marriage of Figaro" at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 14, at the Stephens Performing Art Center's Jensen Grand Concert Hall.

One of the greatest operas ever written, "The Marriage of Figaro" is billed as a witty, yet profound tale of love, revenge and forgiveness set in the late 18th century. Figaro, valet to Count Almaviva, and Susanna, maid to the Countess, are set to be married, but the Count has his own designs on Susanna's virtue. Naturally, Figaro is determined to prevent the Count from compromising his fiancée. What follows is a hilarious exercise in duplicity that leads to a blissful, memorable finale, all set to Mozart's timeless music.

For more information on this group visit: www.operaidaho.org.

Tickets for the opera will cost $25 for adults and $15 for children in the lower balcony, and $21 for adults and $11 for children in the upper balcony.

Tickets can be purchased at the Stephens Center Box Office, over the phone at 282-3595 or online at www.isu.edu/tickets. They can also be purchased at Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello or Idaho Falls and at the ISU Pond Student Union. The Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office is open one hour prior to show times.

This concert is part of ISU's Opera week. Events surrounding Opera Idaho's visit include a residency with the lead performers at each Pocatello high school, and a pre-opera discussion with Mark Junkert, executive director for Opera Idaho.

On Nov. 16, ISU will again host the Metropolitan Opera National Council District Auditions. The National Council Auditions program is designed to discover promising young opera singers and to assist in the development of their careers. Judges for the competition will be Grammy-nominated opera conductor Sara Jobin, internationally-renowned soprano Sally Wolf, and collaborative artist Thomas Muraco from the Manhattan School of Music.

The Department of Music has four students who will compete to advance to the Metropolitan Opera regional auditions: Emma Doupé, from Middleton; Jerrica Matthews, Bear Lake County; John Punt, Idaho Falls; and Lakota Terrace, Mackay. Audience members will also have the opportunity to vote for their favorite. Tickets for the competition on Saturday are $8 for adults, $6 for ISU faculty and staff and $4 for pre-college students. ISU students are admitted free.

Opera Week will finish on Nov. 17 with a master class featuring ISU music majors working with Thomas Muraco. Admission to the master class with Muraco is free.

ISU's participants will present their programs at Pocatello's First Friday Artwalk on Nov. 1 at Trinity Episcopal Church. The public is invited to the free preview of the students' performances.

Idaho State University is encouraging students to "Be Advised" prior to class-level registration which begins in mid-November for the spring 2014 semester

Idaho State University is encouraging students to "Be Advised" prior to class-level registration which begins in mid-November for the spring 2014 semester.

"Students benefit by receiving regular advising," said JoAnn Hertz, director of ISU Central Academic Advising. "Interaction with professional advisors who explain the curriculum requirements and policies of the university as well as with departmental faculty who are experts in their field provides an advantage to any student who seeks it."

The "Be Advised" campaign led by ISU Central Academic Advising helps students gain the information they need to be successful in their degree program.

The benefits of advising for students are many and include direct contact with faculty; up-to-date information from the department; assistance with long-range degree completion planning; understanding what is needed to stay on track to graduation; invitations to relevant learning opportunities outside of the classroom, and assistance in choosing the most advantageous "catalog year."

"With regular advising between conscientious students and knowledgeable advisors, students can graduate in the time frame they desire, said Hertz. "Additionally, students who develop positive academic relationships with professors will have powerful and influential references for scholarships, or research and internship opportunities, or employment recommendations. Faculty advisors can also help with career questions and graduate school applications."

The spring 2014 online class schedule will be viewable beginning Oct. 28. Online registration opens at 12:01 a.m. for each class-level as follows:

For more information, contact ISU Central Academic Advising at (208) 282-3277 or advinfo@isu.edu.

Idaho State University's Committee for the Study of Violence, Conflict and War in Society will present "In a State of Conflict: The Personal Experience and Expression of War" as part of the Humanities Café on Thursday, Nov. 7

Idaho State University's Committee for the Study of Violence, Conflict and War in Society will present "In a State of Conflict: The Personal Experience and Expression of War" as part of the Humanities Café on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 6 p.m. at Portneuf Valley Brewery located at 615 South 1st Ave.

The series theme this year is "Exploring Gender and Sexuality" and this presentation will be given by Linda Leeuwrik, assistant professor of art history and Lauren Thompson, a doctorate candidate of history from the University of Bradford, United Kingdom.

Beginning in the First World War and culminating in the Second, Leeuwrik's presentation will look at how German artist George Grosz's thought and art became increasingly politicized and reflected a harsh view of modern Germany, often through a gendered lens.

Thompson's presentation will explore the impact of the Second World War on the individual through the wartime diary of English civilian and grammar school master Kenneth Preston-in particular, the impact of the projection of idealized masculinity and citizenship is explored.

Light hors d'oeuvres will be provided for this free event sponsored by the Student Social Work Association.

For more information contact Linda Leeuwrik at 282-4741 or leeulind@isu.edu.

Idaho State University and The Anderson Gender Resource Center, through a grant from the Department of Health and Welfare will host a free film screening, "A Girl Like Her," followed by a panel discussion on Nov. 7

Idaho State University and The Anderson Gender Resource Center, through a grant from the Department of Health and Welfare will host a free film screening, "A Girl Like Her," followed by a panel discussion on Nov. 7 at 4 p.m. in the North Fork Room of the Pond Student Union Building.

Between 1945 and 1973, 1.5 million young and unmarried American women, faced with enormous social pressure, gave their babies up for adoption. In "A Girl Like Her," Ann Fessler invites viewers to learn and better understand the untold stories of these young women and their struggles as they were sent to maternity homes to give birth and then immediately surrender their children. Returning home alone, they were encouraged to keep silent, move on, and forget what had happened. The film is based on Fessler's award winning book, "The Girls Who Went Away," and addresses issues like dating, sex, "illegitimate" pregnancies and how the public has, or perhaps has not, changed attitudes in these matters.

Following the film will be a panel discussion with participants representing different decades as well as geographical regions, to compare and illustrate differences in both time and place. The goal is to make this event educational, enlightening, open-minded and respectful.

For more information about the event, please contact the Gender Resource Center at 282-2805. For more information about the film, please visit http://agirllikeher.com/

Scholarship fundraising and crafts for sale will be some highlights of the Idaho State University Women's Club Holiday Fair. The event is in the Pond Student Union Ballroom on Friday, Nov. 8 and Sat. Nov. 9

Scholarship fundraising and crafts for sale will be some highlights of the Idaho State University Women's Club Holiday Fair. The event is in the Pond Student Union Ballroom on Friday, Nov. 8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

All proceeds from the event will fund ISU student scholarships. The Women's Club awards three $3,000 scholarships per year, one each to a junior woman, College of Technology student and child of an ISU employee.

Lunch will be available at 11 a.m. on Friday.

The Holiday Fair will feature a basket silent auction with donations from ISU departments and community members. The ISU Women's Club will have booths with raffles, Upscale Resale and Heartfelt Creations.

Community vendors will sell pottery, jewelry, handmade crafts, artwork, photography and lotions and potions.

Free parking will be available in the Pond Student Union lot.

The Idaho State University College of Education will host a Celebrating Excellence reception honoring three alumni on Wednesday, Nov. 6

The Idaho State University College of Education will host a Celebrating Excellence reception honoring three alumni on Wednesday, Nov. 6, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Marshall Rotunda of the Stephens Performing Arts Center. This year's Pride of the College honorees are: Distinguished Leader, Shawnae Somsen; Outstanding Educator, Bev Crawford; and Bengal Partner, Will Fanning. They were nominated and selected by colleagues in the education community.

Shawnae Somsen received her Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and Health Education from Idaho State University in 1997. Following graduation, she spent time teaching physical education and coaching volleyball and softball in Houston.

She returned to Idaho in 2002 as a physical education teacher at Soda Springs High School where she continues to teach today. Since 2006, Somsen has been granted nearly $30,000 for various projects to make her school and community a better place.

She was named the 2010 Northwest District Physical Education High School Teacher of the Year by the Northwest Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. She was named the 2009 Physical Education High School Teacher of the Year by Idaho Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

Bev Crawford, a native of Mackay, graduated from Idaho State University with a Bachelor of Science in parks and recreation management. Crawford later returned to ISU, commuting many days a week from Mackay, to complete a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education. Crawford completed a Master of Education degree in literacy from ISU and is a National Board Certified Teacher.

She began her teaching career at Mackay Elementary, where she has taught for the last 26 years. In addition to teaching second grade, Crawford also teaches a summer art program and is active in the 4-H youth horse program.

Will Fanning moved to Pocatello as a child. Fanning completed his higher education at Idaho State University, including an Associate of Arts degree in drafting, a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resource Training and Development, and a Master of Training and Development with an emphasis in Professional Technical Education Administration.

He entered the work force in 2000, and later opened his own steel detailing company in Pocatello.

In 2005, Fanning joined the College of Technology as a drafting instructor and in 2006 became the program coordinator for the newly designed Computer Aided Design Drafting Program. In 2008, he became the Technical Department Chair in the College of Technology. Fanning moved to the College of Western Idaho in 2011, where he serves as dean of Professional Technical Education.

Fanning is currently completing a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership in the College of Education with an emphasis in Higher Education Administration. He will graduate in Spring 2014.

For information about the Celebrating Excellence reception or to RSVP, contact Cydney Pearce at pearcydn@isu.edu or (208) 282-5670.

The Idaho State University Alumni Association Board of Directors welcomed seven new directors at their annual Homecoming meeting in October

The Idaho State University Alumni Association Board of Directors welcomed seven new directors at their annual Homecoming meeting in October.

New members are Ryan J. Sargent, Pocatello; Dustin Mortimer, Boise; Joshua C. Whitworth, Boise; Jamie L. Bell, Pocatello; Gregory N. Bosen, Idaho Falls; Craig D. Hobdey, Gooding; and Debbie L. Thompson, Pocatello.

Also installed is new board president, Larry Satterwhite, Boise.

The president's term is two years and board members terms are four years.

Anyone interested in serving on the Alumni Board of Directors can obtain additional information from any current board member or information can be found on the Alumni website at http://www.isu.edu/alumni/board.html.

Dr. Sivaisish Biswas of the University of Assam--Diphu, India, and currently a Fulbright Lecturer in English at Central Arizona College, will give a talk Nov. 8 on "The Marginalized Experience: Northeastern India"

Dr. Sivaisish Biswas of the University of Assam--Diphu, India, and currently a Fulbright Lecturer in English at Central Arizona College, will give a talk Nov. 8 on "The Marginalized Experience: Northeastern India."

The talk is set for 3:30 - 5 p.m. in Liberal Arts 256. This subject grows out of his experiences of living and teaching at universities in an area of India that's noteworthy for its ethnic, linguistic and religious differences from the rest of the country. Indigenous peoples of this region share concerns and interests with, for example, Native Americans, and also offer a window onto the diversity of a country that westerners (and most other Indians) tend to homogenize. Dr. Biswas will speak from his intimate knowledge of some of these groups, such as the Mizo, and their educational values and goals. He will accompany his talk with film clips, and will take questions from the audience.

This lecture is possible with support from ISU's Cultural Events Committee.