News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

October 7, 2013 — Vol. 29 No. 34

Faculty/Staff Updates

A study about the effects of "loudmouths" in groups, conducted by researchers from Idaho State University and the University of Utah, was recently discussed in an article by the Wall Street Journal

A study about the effects of "loudmouths" in groups, conducted by researchers from Idaho State University and the University of Utah, was recently discussed in an article by the Wall Street Journal. Alex Bolinger, assistant professor in the Department of Management, worked with his former dissertation adviser from the University of Utah, Bryan Bonner, on the study titled "Separating the Confident from the Correct."

"It's pretty incredible. I was really surprised that [the Wall Street Journal] picked it up," said Bolinger. "I am really excited for ISU. I think it's a good opportunity to get exposure for the kinds of research that is being done here."

The link to the Wall Street Journal story is http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-headlines/SS-2-63399/SS-2-339950/. The study will be published in the November 2013 issue of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. It addresses the issue of more confident or extraverted individuals who dominate group conversations, often leaving out quieter group members who may have valuable knowledge that they don't get a chance to share.

Bolinger said that he and Bonner study how members of groups and teams work together to solve problems. During their research, they saw that many groups lack an organized process, instead launching right into problem-solving instead of creating a strategy. Most groups don't take the time to establish which group members have the best knowledge or resources to solve a particular problem, leaving a wide-open space for outgoing members to take over the process.

Although many people assume that having the confidence to take over a group's discussion means that person is the most knowledgeable about the conversation topic, Bonner and Bolinger's study shows that is not actually the case.

"It might be the more introverted, quiet person who has the key information to help the group," said Bolinger. "But a lot of groups don't leverage that person's knowledge; they never give that person any airtime."

Bolinger suggests that groups can make better use of their quieter but equally capable team members by setting aside a few minutes at the start of a group discussion to establish who knows what.

"A lot of people don't like working in groups very much. Part of the problem is that most groups just jump into the task without talking about how the discussion should be structured. So you end up having one or two people who dominate the conversation, the other members feel left out, and the result is sub-optimal," he said.

In his Organizational Behavior classes, Bolinger teaches his students about how to discuss decision-making to optimize their time working in groups.

"In my classes, we talk all the time about discussing the process before beginning the task. I think that if more groups did that, it would improve the quality of decisions and I think fewer people would be uneasy about working in groups. They would be more receptive to it," he said.

Three advisors from Central Academic Advising presented at the National Academic Advising National Conference in Salt Lake City Oct. 6-9

Three advisors from Central Academic Advising presented at the National Academic Advising (NACADA) National Conference in Salt Lake City Oct. 6-9.

Mary Beth Raynor and Susan Macomb presented Becoming a Resilient Advisor: Burnout Prevention and Self-Care Strategies for Advisors.

Nancy Goodman presented Adventurers and Allies on Campus—The College Experience Through the Lens of Joseph Campbell's The Hero's Journey.

JoAnn Gurenlian, RDH, PhD, was an invited speaker for the ADHA/Santa Fe Group meeting on Transforming Dental Hygiene Education

JoAnn Gurenlian, RDH, PhD, was an invited speaker for the ADHA/Santa Fe Group meeting on Transforming Dental Hygiene Education. Dr. Gurenlian presented "From Whence we Came: The Evolution of Dental Hygienists' Practice and Curriculum Development" on September 19, 2013.

News Bites

Idaho State University clinical associate professor of pharmacy, Tracy Pettinger, recently completed a collaborated, multi-center clinical trial of the new medication, Onglyza for patients with Type 2 diabetes

Idaho State University clinical associate professor of pharmacy, Tracy Pettinger, recently completed a collaborated, multi-center clinical trial of the new medication, Onglyza for patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Pettinger collaborated with Blackfoot Medical Center in the multi-center clinical trials. The study, conducted through Bristol-Meyers Squibb and AstraZeneca,was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that involved 16,500 patients in 25 countries with type 2 diabetes who had a history of established cardiovascular disease or multiple risk factors, with or without renal impairment. The clinical trial study was led by the academic research organizations Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group and Hadassah University Medical Center, and was conducted at more than 700 sites worldwide.

The medication is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic (blood sugar) control only in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in multiple clinical settings.

As of June 2013, the drug has been submitted for regulatory review in 95 countries and is approved in 86 countries including those in the European Union, the United States, Canada, Mexico, India, Brazil and China.

At the end of 2012, diabetes was estimated to affect more than 370 million people between the ages of 20-79 worldwide. Because of the aging population and the growing trend of obesity, the prevalence of diabetes is projected to reach more than 550 million by 2030. Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diagnosed diabetes in adults.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by insulin resistance and dysfunction of beta cells in the pancreas, which decreases insulin sensitivity and secretion, leading to elevated glucose levels. Over time, this sustained hyperglycemia contributes to worsening insulin resistance and further beta cell dysfunction. The major cause of death and complications in patients with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. As many as 80 percent of patients with type 2 diabetes will develop and possibly die from a cardiovascular event.

For more information about Onglyza visit www.onglyza.com and for more information about type 2 diabetes visit www.diabetes.org.

The Idaho State University Society of Physics Students, the Kiwanis Club of Pocatello, and the ISU Department of Physics will be hosting a "Haunted Science Laboratory" exhibit open to the public on Saturday, Oct. 26

The Idaho State University Society of Physics Students, the Kiwanis Club of Pocatello, and the ISU Department of Physics will be hosting a "Haunted Science Laboratory" exhibit open to the public on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 3 to 9 p.m. at the old Carquest warehouse located at 1161 Wilson Ave.

The haunted laboratory will feature interactive exhibits designed to delight, fright, and educate kids of all ages. Exhibits include a Van deGraaf generator, lasers moving to music, and lots of cool illusions with smoke and mirrors. The exhibits are also open to schools and educational groups at no charge by appointment Oct. 21-25.

The entrance fee is $3 per person, or $7 per family (limit 6). All proceeds will go to Kiwanis supported charities benefiting southeast Idaho Children.

For more information about the exhibit or to schedule a school field trip, contact Steve Shropshire in the ISU Department of Physics at shrostev@isu.edu or 282-2212.

The Idaho State University Department of Dental Hygiene recently received grants from Idaho Power and the Ronald McDonald House of Charities of Idaho to purchase mobile dental equipment and start a school-based sealant program at Greenacres Elementary School

The Idaho State University Department of Dental Hygiene recently received grants from Idaho Power and the Ronald McDonald House of Charities of Idaho to purchase mobile dental equipment and start a school-based sealant program at Greenacres Elementary School.

The department will rotate two to four senior dental hygiene students and faculty weekly to implement the program and offer dental care to approximately 70 second-grade students in the spring of 2014

"We couldn't implement this program without mobile equipment," said Karen Portillo, assistant professor and community outreach coordinator for the Department of Dental Hygiene. "Our mobile equipment is something tangible that can be used from year to year for additional programs in the community. We want other schools to hear about us and want a school-based dental sealant program implemented as well."

The school-based program is not only convenient for students, but for parents as well. Students will stay on school property and receive care; relieving parents the stress of taking time off from work and traveling to and from dental clinics.

The Department of Dental Hygiene also reaches out to the community through programs including dental hygiene education for kindergarten through fifth-grade students; oral cancer screening at the Idaho State Veterans Home; and free clinics for students in rural areas where access to dental care is limited.

"We want to expand more into the community with our mobile equipment," said Portillo. "Currently, we have one chair and would like to apply for additional grants to purchase more mobile equipment in the future."

Students and faculty members in the department are also volunteering at the Pocatello Free Dental Clinic this spring to offer services to those who do not have dental insurance and cannot afford to pay for dental services.

For more information about the Department of Dental Hygiene or to schedule an appointment visit www.isu.edu/dentalhy/.

This year's Health Science Experience Night is Tuesday, Oct. 15, 5 to 7:30 p.m., at the ISU-Meridian Health Science Center, 1311 E. Center Drive

Freshman Alissia Draper entered Idaho State University this fall with a new iPad in hand, and she has her mom to thank.

Alissia won the iPad at last year's ISU-Meridian Health Science Experience Night, which is an annual event offered to introduce Treasure Valley high school and college transfer students to ISU health science programs.

Had it not been for her mother, she probably would've stayed home. "I'd just returned to Boise after touring the Pocatello campus and I was tired," the 2013 Centennial High School graduate said.

But Alissia's mother encouraged her to go. Not only did she win the tablet computer, but she had the opportunity to meet ISU faculty, students and participate in hands-on demonstrations in the health sciences.

"It was great being able to talk to students in the programs and getting to hear about their experiences," said Alissia, who wants to become a physician assistant after she completes her undergraduate studies.

This year's Health Science Experience Night is Tuesday, Oct. 15, 5 to 7:30 p.m., at the ISU -Meridian Health Science Center, 1311 E. Center Drive. Attendees are eligible to enter a drawing for a free iPad. Winning is contingent upon attending ISU.

"Health Science Experience Night is a wonderful opportunity for Treasure Valley students to delve into the health professions. They experience hands-on what professionals do in the field each day. We invite students and parents to participate in this annual event," said ISU-Meridian Enrollment Services Director Ali Crane.

Health Science Experience night will be held in conjunction with the College of Pharmacy Open House and chili cook-off in the L.S. Skaggs Pharmacy Complex. The meal is $5 and proceeds support pharmacy outreach projects.Pharmacy students and faculty will also be available at 6:45 p.m. for a question and answer session for prospective students.

Pharmacy students will conduct free blood pressure checks; provide education about diabetes, heart health, prescription drug abuse and poison prevention; and administer flu shots. The first 50 flu shots are free. After that, the cost is $29.99 cash or check.

For information about Health Science Experience Night, call 208-373-1700. For information about the Pharmacy Open House, call 208-373-1821.

As for Alissia, she's putting her iPad to good use-downloading textbooks, checking email, accessing study materials and connecting with the Bengal community.

Another plus to having her own iPad? "I don't have to share it with my family," she said with a laugh.

Complete your autumn decorations or sample some great chili at the Annual Scarecrow Auction and Chili Wars brought to you by the Bengal Athletic Boosters along with Pinehurst Floral and Greenhouse on Saturday, Oct. 16

Complete your autumn decorations or sample some great chili at the Annual Scarecrow Auction and Chili Wars brought to you by the Bengal Athletic Boosters along with Pinehurst Floral and Greenhouse on Saturday, Oct. 16 at 6 p.m. at the Pinehurst Greenhouse on Poleline Rd.

Admission is free for the event and there will be an auction for scarecrows with the proceeds going towards scholarships for Student Athletes at Idaho State University.

Organizations and businesses can build a scarecrow for the auction, the donor of the scarecrow that receives the highest bid will win four floor tickets to an ISU basketball home game.

Individuals can enter the Chili Wars which will be judged by a panel of three celebrity judges.

To enter a scarecrow in the call Pennie at 237-6522 to enter the Chili Wars call Donna Hays at 282-5773.

Idaho State University undergraduate and graduate students can enter a contest to create the design for this year's ISU holiday card

Idaho State University undergraduate and graduate students can enter a contest to create the design for this year's ISU holiday card. The contest winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize, the runner-up a $500 cash prize. The winning entry will appear on the University holiday card, which is sent to thousands of University family members and supporters.

The deadline for entries is 5 p.m. Oct. 14 and the winning selection will be announced by Oct. 18. Entrants should try to capture the spirit and beauty of the winter holiday season, while thematically incorporating ISU.

Contest rules are:

All entries must be turned in to the President's Office by 5 p.m. on Oct. 14. No entries will be accepted after that time. All entries, except the winning entry, can be picked up in the President's Office between Oct. 21 and Oct. 25. ISU will not be responsible for entries not picked up before Oct. 26.

For more information, contact the ISU President's Office at (208) 282-4798, or e-mail johnally@isu.edu with any questions.

Idaho State University Central Academic Advising will host the annual ISU Majors and Minors Fair titled, "Find Your Major Mojo," on Oct. 16 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Pond Student Union

Idaho State University Central Academic Advising will host the annual ISU Majors and Minors Fair titled, "Find Your Major Mojo," on Oct. 16 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Pond Student Union.

ISU undergraduate departments will be represented at the majors and minors fair and faculty will be available to answer questions and explain program options. Students are encouraged to take advantage of having access to ISU departments in one location and use the event to find a major or minor that is a suitable with their interests and talents.

Undergraduate students must declare a major by the time they are a junior (58 credits), but it is recommended to narrow down major and minor choices by the end of freshman year. Central Academic Advising will be providing information on the importance of major and career exploration, assessing academic aptitude, how to declare a major and minor, and the importance of the "catalog year."

High school seniors have been invited to participate in a full morning of activities at ISU on Oct. 16, including the majors and minors fair from 11 a.m. to noon. Students are asked to sign up at their school to participate and for transportation to ISU.

The majors and minors fair is part of the semester long "Harvest Your Potential" series sponsored by Central Academic Advising.

For more information on these fairs or "Harvest Your Potential," please visit www.isu.edu/advising or contact Nancy Goodman at goodnanc@isu.edu or 282-3277.

The Idaho State University School of Performing Arts Theatre will present "The Philadelphia Story" in the Bistline Theatre inside the Stephens Performing Arts Center on Oct. 11, 12, 14, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m.

The Idaho State University School of Performing Arts Theatre will present "The Philadelphia Story" in the Bistline Theatre inside the Stephens Performing Arts Center on Oct. 11, 12, 14, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m.

In this 1939 American classic by Phillip Barry, audiences meet the Lords of Philadelphia. Tracy Lord's final preparations for her wedding to mining heir George Kittredge are complicated by the arrival of reporters from a muckraking scandal sheet and by the re-appearance of her former husband, C.K. Dexter Haven.

The play served as a "comeback vehicle" for Katherine Hepburn who also starred in the 1940 film, along with Cary Grant. The play is a delightful, stylized, romantic comedy replete with lots of "eye candy." The costumes are designed by Edward Stevenson, the Pocatello boy who became a noted costumer for Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO) studios, designing many costumes for this era. The ISU costume shop will convert Stevenson's renderings into costumes for this production.

Tickets are $15 for adults, $14 for faculty, staff and seniors, $10 for pre-college students, $7 for ISU students, and $10 for group rates of 10 or more people. Tickets can be purchased at the box office, the information desk inside the Pond Student Union Building, Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello and Idaho Falls, or online at www.isu.edu/tickets. For more information contact the box office at 282-3595.