News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

September 23, 2013 — Vol. 29 No. 32

Faculty/Staff Updates

Provost Laura Woodworth-Ney is pleased to announce that Dr. Margaret Johnson has been appointed from a national search to serve as Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs

Provost Laura Woodworth-Ney is pleased to announce that Dr. Margaret Johnson has been appointed from a national search to serve as Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Dr. Johnson is currently in her 15th year at Idaho State University, and is a full professor of English. She has extensive administrative experience, having served as chair of the department of English and Philosophy, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Professor Johnson teaches and publishes in the areas of composition and rhetoric, literature and writing pedagogy, postmodern American literature, and film studies. She earned a PhD in English from the University of Oregon in 1998, an MA in English from San Jose State University in 1990, and a BS from UC Berkeley in business administration (accounting emphasis) in 1986.

Johnson began her duties on Sept. 9.

Finding evidence to verify what nurses already know from their everyday experience is the topic of an Idaho State University nursing professor's new study

Finding evidence to verify what nurses already know from their everyday experience is the topic of an Idaho State University nursing professor's new study.

Mary Anne Reynolds' one-year descriptive study on palliative care was funded by the American Nurses Foundation for $5,000. Palliative care is the specialized medical treatment for people with limiting and potentially life-ending illnesses.

"Palliative Care Needs of Young and Middle Age Adults (20-59) with a Potentially Life Limiting Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study," is the title of Reynolds' grant. She said nurses see recurring patterns in palliative care for this population, but there is a lack of evidence-based research that describes those needs. Her study of 25 oncology patients in Pocatello and Idaho Falls is intended to provide that evidence.

Reynolds said resources and literature about cancer are abundant for children and the elderly. Young and middle-aged people with life-limiting cancers have specific needs, Reynolds said, but "there is nothing to validate what those are."

For a young or middle-aged person "at the peak of their physical and cognitive abilities," the diagnosis of cancer and demanding physical treatments can bring about a sense of isolation, can interrupt family and work commitments and can challenge available resources. During six months of data collection, Reynolds intends to describe these observations to the nursing world, which she described as an "evidence-based practice." By publishing her results in nursing journals, Reynolds could pave the way for new care models to be put into place for young and middle-aged cancer patients.

Reynolds' hopes to expand her research to 75 patients soon by submitting a grant to the Oncology Nursing Society Foundation. This would allow her to include patients from Boise, Meridian and Twin Falls.

The American Nursing Foundation grant provides funding for a research assistant but Reynolds said she plans to do most of the work herself as the primary investigator. The small size of the study lends itself well to her plans. Institute of Rural Health researcher Cyndy Kelchner aided Reynolds in her grant proposal.

For more information about the palliative care grant, contact Mary Anne Reynolds at reynmary@isu.edu.

Interim Dean Karl Bridges would like to announce that Sandra Shropshire has taken on new role at Eli M. Oboler Library as the Associate University Librarian for Collections & Special Projects

Interim Dean Karl Bridges would like to announce that Sandra Shropshire has taken on new role at Eli M. Oboler Library as the Associate University Librarian for Collections & Special Projects. As such, she will be responsible for all aspects of collection development, along with special projects, such as the upcoming LibQual Survey to measure library effectiveness. In addition, she will help to establish the Institutional Repository for the university, work to promote and implement improvements to funds allocation and budgets, and work on strategic planning and program prioritization. She will also continue on with duties appropriate for a full tenured professor.

Sierra Kauer, a graduate student in Experimental Psychology, has been awarded the Sandra G. Wiener Student Investigator Award by the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology

Sierra Kauer, a graduate student in Experimental Psychology, has been awarded the Sandra G. Wiener Student Investigator Award by the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology. This is the most prestigious student award from the society. It includes a travel award, recognition at the meeting, and an oral presentation at the annual November meeting.

Gregory Ehardt has been invited to speak in Philadelphia and New York to national audiences of health care providers and universities on HIPAA and other health care-related laws

Gregory Ehardt has been invited to speak in Philadelphia and New York to national audiences of health care providers and universities on HIPAA and other health care-related laws. Other speakers included highly acclaimed attorneys who write health care laws in Washington DC for the White House and Congress.

News Bites

Idaho State University is thrilled to introduce a new program that is designed to increase new student success: The First Year Experience

Idaho State University is thrilled to introduce a new program that is designed to increase new student success: The First Year Experience.

New Student Orientation and the Student Success Center have partnered to create the First Year Experience (FYE) program. This program has been designed to increase retention for first-year students, allowing these students to achieve their academic goals at ISU.

FYE has 32 student-leader representatives, referred to as the ISU Emissaries.

The Emissaries will be an on-campus resources for first year students to utilize throughout the calendar year. During this past summer, the Emissaries made monthly phone calls to new students and answered questions about orientation, connected them with academic departments, and helped them to solve issues and concerns regarding their first semester here at ISU. The Emissaries supported and planned New Student Orientation. They will further host monthly First Year Experience events for incoming students in order to encourage involvement and create connections within the ISU community. The events over the coming year will include service opportunities, leadership development activities, academic programming, and social involvement opportunities.

The goal of this integrated program is to improve student retention, assist with the pressures and concerns of the first year, and help all of our students achieve their goals of graduation and degree completion.

If you have any questions, please call (208) 282-3662 or email us at firstyear@isu.edu.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $99,335 grant to Idaho State University Professor Hossein Mousavinezhad for the study of advanced algorithms for efficient use of electromagnetic spectrum, which ultimately could help relieve congestion on the World Wide Web and other "information superhighways"

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $99,335 grant to Idaho State University Professor Hossein Mousavinezhad for the study of advanced algorithms for efficient use of electromagnetic spectrum, which ultimately could help relieve congestion on the World Wide Web and other "information superhighways."

This research work is a collaboration of ISU engineering faculty and scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory.

"This is really a seed grant for bringing together researchers in these rapidly growing fields and to organize a research symposium to be held in Idaho Falls in spring of 2014," Mousavinezhad said.

As more and more people use wireless and smart devices the information super highways become congested, he noted. According to accepted scientific theory (the Shannon's channel capacity theorem), the upper limit of information transmission in a communication channel such as the World Wide Web is limited by mainly two factors: the signal to noise ratio and the bandwidth.

"From green computing point of view, one does not want to increase transmission power without limits," Mousavinezhad said. "On the other hand, bandwidth is also limited and regulated for different applications (in the United States it is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission). Therefore it is very important for researchers to come up with innovative algorithms to conserve the bandwidth for high speed applications and those needing wider bands of frequencies for proper operation of industrial, commercial, military and other uses."

Mousavinezhad, a professor of electrical engineering in the ISU College of Science and Engineering, will direct the project as principal investigator. Co-principal investigators on the project are Steve Chiu, ISU electrical engineering associate professor, Dawid Zydek, ISU electrical engineering assistant professor, and Thad Welch, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Boise State University.

Collaborators from Idaho National Laboratory are Rangam Subraminian and Hussein Moradi, INL Wireless Technology Strategy, National and Homeland Security. INL has facilities for testing and evaluations of wire.

El Korah Shriners and Idaho State University-Meridian are hosting a free screening clinic for children with orthopedic conditions, burns and spinal cord injuries

El Korah Shriners and Idaho State University-Meridian are hosting a free screening clinic for children with orthopedic conditions, burns and spinal cord injuries

The clinic is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 5, 9 a.m to 1 p.m., at the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, 1311 E. Central Drive, in Meridian. The Center is located on the north side of I-84 between Locust Grove and Meridian roads.

Volunteer physicians will screen children and teens under age 18 for a variety of conditions, including orthopedic and spinal cord injuries, burns, and cleft lip and palate. The physicians will be assisted by ISU faculty and student clinicians representing programs in physician assistant studies, physical therapy, audiology and speech-language pathology.

The purpose of the screening clinic is to evaluate children for possible treatment at a Shriners Hospital for Children. Reimbursement for patient and guardian travel is available based on the needs of the family, according to El Korah Shriners Potentate Ron Lester.

"The El Korah Shriners are excited to work with the staff at ISU-Meridian to present this annual screening clinic. The facilities and the staff and leadership at ISU-Meridian offer a high level of expertise and medical professionalism that Shriners value," said Lester.

The 22 Shriners Hospitals for Children are dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing pediatric specialty care regardless of the patient's ability to pay.

This is the fourth year ISU-Meridian and the Shriners have partnered to present the screening.

"We're delighted to partner with the El Korah Shriners. The free screening clinic is a wonderful opportunity for our students to gain valuable inter-professional clinical experience while helping children in the Treasure Valley community get expert specialty care for orthopedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries, and cleft lip and palate at Shriners Hospitals," said ISU-Meridian Associate Vice President Bessie Katsilometes.

For more information about the Oct. 5 screening clinic, call 208-343-0571.

Get your hearing checked for free Oct. 15 at the Speech and Language Clinic at the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center

Get your hearing checked for free Oct. 15 at the Speech and Language Clinic at the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, 1311 E. Central Drive, in Meridian.

Free screenings are also set for Oct. 15, Nov. 19 and Dec. 10. Hours are 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. No appointment is necessary, and clinicians will see adults, teens and children as young as 3-years-old.

Audiology and speech-language pathology graduate students, under the supervision of licensed speech-language pathologists and audiologists, will conduct the screenings.

Participants will receive their results immediately, including referrals if further evaluation is needed, according to organizers.

"Research from John Hopkins indicates one in five Americans has significant hearing loss, far more than previously thought," said Dr. Gabriel Bargen, audiologist and assistant professor at ISU-Meridian.

For more information, call Bargen at 373-1722 or clinic coordinator Cally Stone at 373-1723.

The Idaho State University Department of Computer Information Systems in the ISU College of Business and the Department of Computer Science in the ISU College of Engineering have merged into the Department of Informatics and Computer Science

The Idaho State University Department of Computer Information Systems in the ISU College of Business and the Department of Computer Science in the ISU College of Engineering have merged into the Department of Informatics and Computer Science.

The new department will be housed jointly within the two colleges and faculty will continue to report to their original college through the new, shared chair, Kevin Parker, professor in the College of Business.

Both programs will continue to remain vital parts of Idaho State University. There is an increasing demand for graduates from both programs, and job prospects are excellent. In a recent Forbes report, employers listed computer information systems majors at the top of their recruiting list. Forty-seven percent of those employers said the competition for those graduates is intense, so while other recent graduates fight for jobs, many CIS majors often field multiple offers.

A recent piece in The Seattle Times reports that there is a shortage of graduates in computer science, with three quarters of a million new computer science jobs anticipated this decade.

The Department of Informatics and Computer Science will place a greater emphasis on the Health Informatics degree, in keeping with the University's mission and the College of Business's renewed focus on that mission. New professors with backgrounds in both business informatics and health care informatics are joining the faculty. In addition, the Department will also expand its programs in information assurance and cyber security, building upon ISU's nationally recognized National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC).

Students in the Department of Informatics and Computer Science will have access to the College of Business's excellent Professional Development program, which assists in preparing students for the job market, helps to place students in suitable internships, and works closely with recruiters to place ISU graduates.

Computer technology and its applications in business have generated more jobs than any other area over the past several years. Both programs in the Department of Informatics and Computer Science offer broad-based, rigorous curricula that combine a solid background in technology and theory. A real-world approach to career opportunities and advancement will prepare students for a successful future in the evolving, fast-paced technology industry.

Idaho State University undergraduate and graduate students can enter a contest to create the design for this year's ISU holiday card

Idaho State University undergraduate and graduate students can enter a contest to create the design for this year's ISU holiday card. The contest winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize, the runner-up a $500 cash prize. The winning entry will appear on the University holiday card, which is sent to thousands of University family members and supporters.

The deadline for entries is 5 p.m. Oct. 14 and the winning selection will be announced by Oct. 18. Entrants should try to capture the spirit and beauty of the winter holiday season, while thematically incorporating ISU.

Contest rules are:

All entries must be turned in to the President's Office by 5 p.m. on Oct. 14. No entries will be accepted after that time. All entries, except the winning entry, can be picked up in the President's Office between Oct. 21 and Oct. 25. ISU will not be responsible for entries not picked up before Oct. 26.

For more information, contact the ISU President's Office at (208) 282-4798, or e-mail johnally@isu.edu with any questions.

The Idaho State University occupational therapy program will host its annual CarFit event at the Holt Arena parking lot in Pocatello Monday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The Idaho State University occupational therapy program will host its annual CarFit event at the Holt Arena parking lot in Pocatello Monday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The ISU occupational therapy program began hosting CarFit events in 2009, and is now in its fifth year of hosting events.

Drivers who would like to attend this event are encouraged to call 282-2590 for an appointment if possible, but those without appointments are also welcome and will be worked in as quickly as possible.

CarFit is an education program mainly for older drivers to ensure that their car is a proper fit for them in terms of safety and settings but is open to licensed drivers of any age. The CarFit program also provides information and materials that will help increase accessibility and safety of transportation through the community.

CarFit-trained volunteer technicians complete a 12-point checklist on individuals within their own vehicles. The checklist includes such items as seat position, seatbelt use, steering wheel position, mirror adjustment, head restraint position and ability to reach and operate vehicle controls. The technicians provide education regarding adjustments that seniors may wish to try in order to improve the safety and comfort of their driving positions.

For more information about the ISU event, contact Ted Peterson, ISU clinical assistant professor of occupational therapy, at 282-4631 or petetheo@isu.edu.

For more information about the CarFit program, visit www.car-fit.org.

Coinciding Idaho State University's celebration of 50 years as a university is the dental hygiene department's celebration of 50 years of graduates

Coinciding Idaho State University's celebration of 50 years as a university is the dental hygiene department's celebration of 50 years of graduates. Information and registration for the event can be found at www.isu.edu/dentalhy/fifty.shtml or by calling 208-282-2482. The tradition of festive dental hygiene times at Idaho State continues.

ISU-Meridian sponsors Free Community Health Screening for uninsured adults Thursday, Oct. 3

ISU-Meridian is sponsoring a Free Community Health Screening for uninsured adults Thursday, Oct. 3.

The screening is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise.

Services will include:

The screenings began in March 2010 through a partnership with the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. More than 600 adults have been screened with many referred to low-cost clinics and doctors for further treatment.

Screening services are provided by ISU-Meridian health professions students under the supervision of clinical faculty.

"Prevention is a crucial piece of health care, and our mission with these screening events is to identify individuals at risk of preventable diseases," said Dr. Glenda Carr, an ISU-Meridian assistant clinical pharmacy professor and co-director of the health screening program.

The full screening process takes about an hour. No appointment is necessary. Valley Ride bus stops are nearby. For more information, call 373-1700 or e-mail healthyU@isu.edu.

This year will mark the tenth annual reunion of Idaho State University's retired employees

This year will mark the tenth annual reunion of Idaho State University's retired employees. It will be Thursday, Oct. 17 at the Juniper Hills Country Club. All retired ISU faculty and staff and spouses as well as spouses of deceased retirees are invited to attend.

No-host social activities start at 5:30 p.m., followed by a buffet dinner at 7 p.m.

The informal organizing committee of Dick and Donna Sagness, Ron and Joan McCune, Ross and Anita Ruchti, and Glenn Alford once again stresses that this will be an enjoyable evening with the opportunity to reconnect with longtime friends in the ISU community. There is no agenda of speeches or entertainment to interfere with the social function.

"The retired reunion is always a great time," said Dick Sagness, of the informal reunion committee. "Since this will be our tenth reunion, we expect it to be one of the best. It's wonderful to get together with old friends and enjoy each others' company. And the food and beverages are always excellent."

The dinner costs $31 per person, and prepayment before Oct. 10 is required. Payment should be sent to Ross Ruchti, 1435 Ammon, Pocatello, ID 83201. With payment, please enclose how you want your name tag to read.

Retirees who know of other retired ISU employees not receiving an invitation or who have moved are asked to inform a committee member.

For more information on the reunion, call Ron or Joan McCune, 233-8467; Ross or Anita Ruchti, 233-6594; Dick or Donna Sagness, 232-8298.