News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 18, 2013 — Vol. 29 No. 10

Faculty/Staff Updates

Idaho State University's Corey Schou has been elected to the board of (ISC)2, the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, Inc., which is the largest not-for-profit global leader in educating and certifying information security professionals throughout their careers

Idaho State University's Corey Schou has been elected to the board of (ISC)2, the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, Inc., which is the largest not-for-profit global leader in educating and certifying information security professionals throughout their careers.

Schou, who is also vice chair of (ISC)2, is a university professor of informatics, professor of information systems and associate dean for the computer information systems program at Idaho State University. He is also director of the National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC) and the Informatics Research Institute (IRI) at ISU. In addition, he is a founder and current chairperson of the National Colloquium for Information Systems Security Education.

"My election to the (ISC)2 board is a strong statement about the quality of our programs and the level of research that Idaho State University does," Schou said. "Otherwise, I wouldn't have been considered for this position."

Headquartered in the United States and with offices in London, Hong Kong and Tokyo, (ISC)2, provides vendor-neutral education products, career services, and Gold Standard credentials to professionals in more than 135 countries. Its membership is made up of nearly 75,000 certified professionals worldwide. For more information on (ISC)2, visit www.isc2.org.

Under Schou's leadership, the Simplot Decision Support Center Center was cited by the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) for Outstanding Contributions to the Profession and the ISU Information Systems program was designated the National Center of Excellence in Information Assurance Education.

Schou's research and publication interests include information security and privacy, ethics, collaborative decision-making, the impact of technology on organization structure, and the application of technology to managerial decision-making. His work has resulted in more than 200 monographs, books articles and formal presentations.

Using collaborative tools he designed for curriculum development, he compiled and edited computer security training materials and standards for the Department of Defense and the National Institute of Standards. These have now been adopted across the federal government.

All are invited to celebrate with Ruth Moorhead as she retires after 26 years at Idaho State University

All are invited to celebrate with Ruth Moorhead as she retires after 26 years at Idaho State University.

Her retirement reception is set for March 21, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the Bengal Cafe.

Employee Recognition Week is set for April 1-5, with workshops, a benefit fair, a luncheon and an ice cream social

Employee Recognition Week is set for April 1-5, with workshops, a benefit fair, a luncheon and an ice cream social.

Events are designed to thank Idaho State University's staff and faculty for their dedication to ISU. For more information and a schedule of events, visit http://www.isu.edu/humanr/.

News Bites

Niki Peters peers at the intricate web of ribbon-shaped lines and chains rotating across her computer screen in a pharmacy research laboratory at the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center

Niki Peters peers at the intricate web of ribbon-shaped lines and chains rotating across her computer screen in a pharmacy research laboratory at the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center.

Thanks to a sophisticated molecular visualization program called VMD, Peters is able to construct a movie, simulating in 3D how nicotine binds with protein receptors in the human brain.

It's a pretty heady subject for an advanced college student, let alone a high school junior. Yet Peters, who attends Boise's Timberline High School and the Treasure Valley Math and Science Center, doesn't miss a beat.

"It's fun," she said. "I like the fact I can start research here [at ISU] and not wait until I get into college."

Peters, 16, an honor student fluent in Mandarin Chinese, wants to pursue a career in biological research or medical practice. Since December, she has interned two afternoons a week in the research lab of Dr. Dong "Danny" Xu, an assistant professor of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences at ISU-Meridian.

Xu, who joined ISU in 2012, created the internship in biomedical research to give high school and college students an opportunity to explore careers in science, technology, engineering and math, commonly referred to as STEM disciplines.

In addition to Peters, Houston Miller, a student from the Meridian Medical Arts Charter School, joined the internship program in February.

"I like to take students into the lab to spark their interest in STEM subjects," said Xu, noting he enjoys mentoring high-school students and providing them with hands-on experience and career advice.

The unpaid internship provides Peters with a front-row seat in a lab where Xu and his research associates are pursuing a broad range of computational research projects in chemistry, biology, physics and pharmacology.

Xu, who holds a doctorate in computational science from San Diego State University and receives his biomedical research training at the University of California, San Diego, hopes his research in advanced molecular simulation and protein engineering will lead to the discovery of new drugs to treat chemical addictions and mental illnesses, such as depression or schizophrenia.

Xu, who says the student internship is on par with a junior or sophomore level of college biochemistry, is thrilled with the caliber of high school interns from the Treasure Valley.

"They are fast learners. They have a genuine interest in research and science. They are the hope of this country in terms of science and technology," he said.

View Peters' video of nicotinic receptors at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbybD6GHohc.

For more information about the Xu Research Group, visit http://www.dxulab.com/.

Idaho State University Idaho Museum of Natural History and Idaho Public Television will present a night of scientific exploration with Science Trek 2013, which runs from 6 p.m. Friday, April 12, to 8 a.m. Saturday, April 13, at the Museum

Idaho State University Idaho Museum of Natural History and Idaho Public Television will present a night of scientific exploration with Science Trek 2013, which runs from 6 p.m. Friday, April 12, to 8 a.m. Saturday, April 13, at the Museum.

The overnight, sleep-at-the-museum experience will allow children in third through the fifth grades to learn about the frontiers of science. The workshop-style Science Trek Adventures includes hands-on activities and live science presentations, experiments and demonstrations.

Children will have the thrill of an overnight stay at the museum with the saber-tooth cat, the Columbian mammoth, and the International Space Station, among other rare and unique museum exhibits. They will be allowed to choose one of a variety of science workshops to explore the exciting fields of science, technology, engineering and Mathematics.

Pre-registration for Science Trek 2013 is required. The cost to attend is $40 per child. Registration deadline is March 29 and there is no registration at the door. For registration forms and specific, important information necessary to prepare registered children to attend the overnight event visit http://imnh.isu.edu. For additional information or questions contact Kelly F. Pokorny at 282-2195, or pokokell@isu.edu. Registered participants can check-in for the event starting at 6 p.m. on April 12.

This year's event is being co-sponsored by Pocatello Police Department, Union Pacific, Pocatello Fire Department, Kiwanis International Global Volunteer Organization and Monsanto Fund.

Idaho State University invites incoming ISU freshmen and their parents to participate in the 2013 Early Registration event, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 9-12 on ISU Pocatello campus

Idaho State University invites incoming ISU freshmen and their parents to participate in the 2013 Early Registration event, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 9-12 on ISU Pocatello campus. An additional session is set from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 12, at the same location. Students are to choose one session to attend.

ISU Early Registration is an event held every April for high school graduates and other incoming freshmen to ISU. Participants in the program will hear from faculty and professional staff, discover some of the differences between high school and college, learn how to develop an appropriate class schedule and be among the first students to register for fall classes.

Included in the day's agenda is the required Fundamentals of Advising and Registration (FAR) session. Students will attend a FAR session specific to their major or college. Faculty and professional advisors from each college will be on hand to assist students in developing a schedule and in registering for their fall semester courses. Incoming freshmen unable to attend Early Registration will be able to register for fall classes beginning April 22.

Representatives from Financial Aid and Scholarships, Student Insurance, Student Health, Housing, New Student Orientation (NSO), Campus Tours, Photo ID, Computer Center, and the ISU Credit Union will be available to answer questions.

Students are free to leave or to take advantage of the following optional activities once registered:

Early Registration invitations will be sent to new freshman admitted to the fall 2013 semester. Students may register for the event at www.isu.edu/advising/student/nfr.shtml. About 700 new freshmen are expected to participate in Early Registration. For more information contact JoAnn Hertz, ISU Central Academic Center Director, at 208-282-3277.

Learn how to talk about science with your neighbors or the news media at a free workshop, Wednesday, May 29 at Boise State University

Learn how to talk about science with your neighbors or the news media at a free workshop, Wednesday, May 29 at Boise State University.

Faculty, staff and students on all ISU campuses are invited to attend. Click here to register. Space is limited.

The purpose of the workshop - titled Science: Becoming the Messenger - is to help the higher education community improve skills for communicating science to a public audience. It's intended for principal investigators, early-career scientists and engineers, students, postdoctoral scholars, deans, vice presidents, and public information officers, according to organizers. Presenters include bestselling science journalist Chris Mooney and Emmy-award winning producer Joe Schreiber.

The National Science Foundation and Idaho NSF EPSCoR are sponsoring the event. You don't have to be a member of the NSF or EPSCoR to attend.

Greg Finch, our TIAA-CREF Representative, will be on campus March 19, in the HR Conference Room, and March 20, April 23, and April 24 in the Selway Room of the Student Union Building

Greg Finch, our TIAA-CREF Representative, will be on campus March 19, in the HR Conference Room, and March 20, April 23, and April 24 in the Selway Room of the Student Union Building.

Please call 800-732-8353, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., to schedule an appointment.