News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 11, 2013 — Vol. 29 No. 9

News Bites

Sept. 12, 2008, was a big day for Idaho's public universities. Flanked by the research vice presidents from Idaho State, Boise State and University of Idaho, Lt. Gov. Jim Risch announced a $15 million federal grant to study Idaho's changing climate.

The five-year grant was awarded through the National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research or NSF EPSCoR.Titled "Idaho Research Infrastructure Improvement: Water Resources in a Changing Climate," the project stressed collaboration between the three universities while drawing on the strengths of researchers within each institution.

Four and a half years after the project's inception, ISU continues to play a key role in carrying out the grant with ISU geosciences research professor, Nancy Glenn, Ph.D., leading the project statewide.

Glenn says the grant has brought $4.4 million to the university since 2008 while strengthening partnerships with BSU and U of I.

"One of the most exciting achievements has been meeting the long-term goal of increasing research infrastructure in the ISU College of Science and Engineering, especially in disciplines of economic and societal concern," said Glenn, who heads ISU's Boise Center Aerospace Laboratory.

The NSF EPSCoR project focuses on how a changing climate affects water resources and potentially impacts Idaho's resource-based economy. Projects in which ISU faculty have participated include modeling future water availability and how ecosystems in the Salmon River Basin will be affected by changing climate, along with associated shifts in fire frequency and intensity, and insect infestations. Other faculty have investigated how past and current climate change relates to sockeye salmon returns to high elevation lakes like those in the Sawtooth Range of Idaho.

Three new faculty members in the biological sciences and geosciences departments have been hired as part of the grant and a closely related project, enhancing ISU's teaching and research profile.

Biological sciences and ecology associate professor Colden Baxter, Ph.D., who serves as ISU's lead scientist on the NSF EPSCoR project, highlights the importance of the new faculty additions in hydrology, watershed ecology and geotechnology.

"The new faculty has filled key gaps in expertise needed by ISU, and by the state as a whole, to meet the research, educational and technological challenges of understanding and responding to changes in our water resources," he said.

The NSF EPSCoR project has trained numerous undergraduate and graduate students in research and outreach activities, provided start-up and facilities augmentation for faculty campus wide, helped jump-start existing junior faculty, and placed ISU in the national and international research and outreach spotlight.

ISU now has new state-of-the-art instrumentation for the chemical analysis of water and soils located in ISU's Center for Ecological Research and Education, a flume facility for studies of water and sediment processes in streams, and improved cyberinfrastructure that more tightly links science and education efforts across the region, noted Glenn.

"Every aspect of the project's outcomes - the new faculty, students, research, and instrumentation - addresses pertinent issues in Idaho while providing world-class education opportunities," said Glenn.

For more information, contact Nancy Glenn at 208-373-1819.

The Department of Dental Hygiene and the Idaho Museum of Natural History have each received one of 33 Powering Lives Grants Idaho Power has awarded this year to schools and nonprofits.

Museum of Natural History have each received one of 33 Powering Lives Grants Idaho Power has awarded this year to schools and nonprofits.

The IMNH will also be featured on the cover of Idaho Power's 400,000-plus circulation customer newsletter for a story in April about the Powering Lives grants, said Anne Alenskis, corporate communications specialist for Idaho Power.

"We are the caretakers of Idaho's natural and cultural history," said Herb Maschner, Director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History, located at Idaho State University in Pocatello. "The Powering Tomorrow grant will help us improve our educational infrastructure and our ability to serve children."

Each year, IMNH programs reach more than 10,000 Idaho children, K-12, encouraging a love of discovery and lifelong learning. The museum's mission is the collection, interpretation and exhibition of artifacts, fossils, plants and animals in educational ways - each day enriching the lives of Idahoans through better understanding of our natural heritage. The museum, founded in 1934, was designated the State's official museum of natural history by the legislature in 1986.

The Department of Dental Hygiene received its Powering Lives Grant for its efforts in helping prevent tooth decay among low-income children by providing a sealant program and for providing teaching opportunities for ISU students.

The organizations receiving the grants came from all corners of Idaho Power's service area. The grants will help support programs in the following areas: arts; community; environment; health and human services; life skills; literacy; and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

More than 160 organizations submitted entries this year. A complete list of winners is available online at www.idahopower.com/poweringlives, or www.facebook.com/idahopower.

For more information on the IMNH, visit http://imnh.isu.edu/.

For more information on ISU's dental hygiene program, which offers bachelor and master degrees, visit http://www.isu.edu/dentalhy/.

The Idaho State University Saudi Students Association will present Saudi Night from 7 to 9 p.m. March 16 in the Pond Student Union Ballroom.

The Idaho State University Saudi Students Association will present Saudi Night from 7 to 9 p.m. March 16 in the Pond Student Union Ballroom.

The event will feature authentic Saudi food with a show and presentations about Saudi Arabia. The menu will consist of, among other items, a Saudi chicken and rice dish, hummus, salad, cooked vegetable, Middle Eastern bread, a date dessert and coffee.

Tickets, on sale on the Pond Student Union and the Rendezvous Complex, are $7 for ISU students, $9 for ISU faculty and staff, and $10 for the general public.

The Spring 2013 Idaho State University Bachelor of Art/Bachelor of Fine Art Senior Exhibition will run March 12-22 in the Davis Gallery located in the Fine Arts Building at Idaho State University.

The Spring 2013 Idaho State University Bachelor of Art/Bachelor of Fine Art Senior Exhibition will run March 12-22 in the Davis Gallery located in the Fine Arts Building at Idaho State University.

The opening reception for artists, who are scheduled to graduate in May, will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, March 11.

This exhibition will feature artists Andrew Berg B.A.; Lauren Borgholthaus B.A.; Ashley Jackson B.A.; Joshua LaPray, B.F.A.; and Emily McCoy, B.F.A.

All events are free and open to the public.

Berg, originally from Soda Springs, is primarily focused on traditional painting, but he has been exploring other avenues of artistic expression working as a graphic artist for snowboard and wakeboard companies. Berg's long-term goal is to become a children's book illustrator and author, focusing his artwork towards his family, including his wife Abigail, and daughters June and Eva. His art is meant to inspire imagination and encourage people to connect with themselves, others and God.

Borgholthaus was born and raised in Pocatello and her love of the area and the natural beauty in her hometown led her to pursue her degree. Borgholthaus primarily enjoys painting and employs a variety of oils and acrylics in her work.

Jackson was born in Pocatello, but ran away for quite some time and, inevitably, returned to Pocatello where she currently resides. Her work has primarily been in jewelry and metalsmithing, but she also dabbles in ceramics and painting.

Joshua LaPray was born in 1985 in Tacoma, Wash. In August of 2007, he moved from Maryland to Idaho Falls to be with his dad. LaPray's art focuses on drawing and painting. After graduating, he would like to pursue a career as a conceptual artist in the video gaming industry. He is a conceptual artist who primarily works with traditional materials, including graphite, ink, china marker, and sometimes digital or oil painting.

McCoy, a native Pocatello, has turned her artistic focus to printmaking, but she also enjoys painting and mixed media.

The John B. Davis Gallery hours are Monday - Friday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. The gallery is located on the lowest level of the Fine Arts Building #11 on the campus of Idaho State University. For more information please contact Amy Jo Popa at 282-3341 or visit us online at www.isu.edu/art/galleries.shtml.

The Idaho State University Division of Health Sciences Research Symposium on the theme of "The Frontline: Incorporating Research into Evidence-Based Practice" will be held on Friday, March 15, in Pocatello and Meridian.

The Idaho State University Division of Health Sciences Research Symposium on the theme of "The Frontline: Incorporating Research into Evidence-Based Practice" will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, March 15, in the Pond Student Union in Pocatello and in Rooms 697 and 698 at ISU-Meridian.

Sessions will originate from Pocatello and Meridian and will be telecast from one location to the other.

The symposium will feature keynote speaker David J. Keahey, who will deliver the address "20 years of Evidence-Based Management in Physician Assistant Education: Origins, Current Clinical Integration and Future Directions" at 8:45 a.m.

Keahey is from the University of Utah School of Medicine Department of Family and Preventive Medicine.

Registration will run from 8 to 8:30 a.m., and the introduction and keynote will take place at 8:45 a.m. There will be four podium presentations from 10:15 a.m. to noon. From noon to 1 p.m. there will be poster presentations. Refreshments will be served.

For more information on the symposium, contact Lisa Salazar at 208-282-3841 or salalisa@isu.edu, or visit www.isu.edu/healthsciences/research/researchday.shtml.

Idaho State University's "A Season of Note" will present the Jason Bishop Show of illusion and magic at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Frazier Hall.

Idaho State University's "A Season of Note" will present the Jason Bishop Show of illusion and magic at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Frazier Hall.

Bishop is an international, award-winning illusionist who was the youngest person to win the Magician's Alliance of Eastern States Stage Award.

The Jason Bishop Show now tours one of the most dynamic illusion and magic show in the United States. It features exclusive large illusions, award-wining sleight of hand and "close-up" magic that is captured live and projected onto LCD screens for the audiences to have a clear view of every detail. Bishop is currently the only illusionist in the United States to tour with the rare "double levitation," "plasma illusion" and "op-art" presentations.

For more information on the Jason Bishop Show visit the website www.thejasonbishopshow.com.

Adult ticket prices for the show are $18 for lower level and $14 for upper level seating; for children 4-12 ticket prices are $12 lower lever, $8 upper level; ISU student ticket price is $10 for any seating; and family passes for two adults, two children are $40 lower level and $36 upper level .

Tickets can be purchases at the Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office, open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the school year.

Tickets can also be purchased over the phone at 208-282-3595 or online at www.isu.edu/tickets. They can also be purchased at Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello or Idaho Falls. The Box Office is open one hour prior to show times.

"Green Energy" is the topic of the noon-1:30 p.m. March 15 Idaho State University Faculty Development Seminar by Jeff Chritz, consulting engineer, Pocatello.

"Green Energy" is the topic of the noon-1:30 p.m. March 15 Idaho State University Faculty Development Seminar by Jeff Chritz, consulting engineer, Pocatello.

The seminar will be held in Room B-06 of the ISU Eli Oboler Library and will be broadcast to Room 160 at the Tingey Administration Building at the Center for Higher Education at University Place in Idaho Falls, Room 508 at ISU-Meridian and Room C-89 at ISU-Twin Falls at the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls.

According to organizers, as the population of the Earth grows past 7 billion, human beings are changing fundamentally the planet that is our home. Deforestation, car­bon monoxide, garbage, global warming; all of these issues will continue to affect mankind in the coming years. What can we do about it?

As technology progresses, we can find alternative sources of energy, combined with means for reducing our energy usage and increasing our energy efficiency, that give us promise for a better future. Come and find out what you can do to ensure a better future for all of us.

The speaker is the founder and CEO of a startup aimed at giving people the tools to monitor and reduce their own energy usage.

This academic forum is sponsored by the ISU Office of Academic Affairs, the ISU College of Science and Engineering, the ISU Department of Electrical Engineering and the Bannock Development Corporation.

For more information, contact ISU Department of Electrical Engineering Professor and Chair S. Hossein Mousavinezhad, 208-282-3292.

The Idaho Detective/Spy Festival, exploring the detective and spy genre in literature and film, will be held March 17-21 at Idaho State University and the Portneuf Brewery in Pocatello.

The Idaho Detective/Spy Festival, exploring the detective and spy genre in literature and film, will be held March 17-21 at Idaho State University and the Portneuf Brewery in Pocatello.

The festival, organized by the ISU Departments of English and Philosophy and Languages and Literature, will present films, lectures, and a panel discussion offering the Pocatello and ISU communities an enriching opportunity to reflect on the nature of this category of literature and film, especially the representations of violence and crime proper to it.

The festival schedule is as follows:

The selections of films emphasize the international scope of the genre. The American work "Arbitrage," was directed by Nicholas Jarecki, fall 2012; Martin Ritt's English film "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold," was filmed in1963; and the Norwegian "Headhunters," 2011, directed by Morton Tyldum, was based on the novel by popular Norwegian writer Jo Nesbo.

"Arbitrage" and "Headhunters" offer very recent and acclaimed films in the detective and crime genre. Audiences will also have the chance to see the film version of John Le Carré's classic spy novel, "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold," which exposes the moral cost of spying for one's country, the human price paid by the spies and the people they use.

Keynote speaker John Scaggs, professor of English at Southwestern College, Winfield, Kan., an expert on crime fiction, will lecture on "Reading Crime and Restoring Order: The International Importance of Crime Fiction." His talk, followed by a discussion, will address the ability of the genre to reinvent itself in response to changing social and cultural issues. Scaggs is the author of the acclaimed introduction to the genre, "Crime Fiction" (2005) and a regular contributor to the Mystery Caucus at the Popular Culture Association of America.

The three scholars making up the panel for the Humanities Cafe, include Sobchack, along with Dan Hunt, ISU associate professor in the Department of Languages and Literature, and Alan Johnson, professor in the Department of English and Philosophy, will take up violence, censorship, terrorism and secrecy in the spy/detective genre.

For the panel, Sobchack will look at the violent acts carried out by both sexes in classic film noir. Hunt will analyze the new role of the lone-wolf detective in Latin American fiction by Taibo. Johnson will interpret the spy's secrecy and loneliness as reflections of human behavior-about what we like and don't like, about what drives some people to the edge.

The following sponsors have generously made these events possible: The Idaho Humanities Council, The Cultural Events Committee of ISU, the ISU Committee on the Study of Violence in Society, and the ISU Cinema Circle.

For more information, contact Pamela Park, Languages and Literature program director/professor, 208-282-3717 or parkpame@isu.edu.