News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

December 17, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 45

Faculty/Staff Updates

Idaho State University's Beverly Klug, associate professor of education, has authored a new book "Standing Together: American Indian Education as Culturally Responsive Pedagogy" that examines educational programming for Native students

Idaho State University's Beverly Klug, associate professor of education, has authored a new book "Standing Together: American Indian Education as Culturally Responsive Pedagogy" that examines educational programming for Native students.

"Across the United States, there exist many false and misleading perceptions concerning American Indians and their cultures," Klug said. "These perceptions have proven to be detrimental to the success of Native students, especially where these practices tend to reflect 'one-size-fits-all' educational programming."

To address this problem, the Association of Teacher Educators (ATE) created a Commission on the Education of the American Indian to address the needs of Native students and how to better prepare in-service and new teachers through new information to assist in changing the way Native students are educated in our schools.

The commission's efforts are presented in Klug's new book, which brings together Native and non-Native voices in an exploration of American Indian education in a way that has not been done previously.

"This volume represents some of the research and thinking that has resulted from our first three years of work," said Jane McCarthy, ATE Commission chair. "We have presented our work several times a year to diverse audiences at our Association of Teacher Education (ATE) conferences. Our work has been influenced by the input and feedback from our colleagues who have generously critiqued and responded to our papers and seminars."

The book is divided into three sections, with Part I providing an overview of what has been done the current era of Tribal self-determination to promote successful educational efforts to grow and change institutions serving Native students.

Part II of the book centers on the educational reform efforts of No Child Left Behind (2001) and how this legislation has negatively impacted education for American Indian students.

Lastly, Part III of the book focuses on the future and developing Native leadership for schools while finding common ground that recognizes and respects the legitimacy of both Native American and European systems of education.

"This volume is designed to stimulate thinking and discussion and to spur action on the part of educators to work for social justice in all aspects of our educational system, and in particular for a much neglected sector, the education of the American Indian," Klug said.

News Bites

The new geological map of Idaho, which was created with extensive input from Idaho State University, is available locally for purchase at the Idaho Museum of Natural History gift shop

The new geological map of Idaho, which was created with extensive input from Idaho State University, is available locally for purchase at the Idaho Museum of Natural History gift shop.

This is the first geologic map of Idaho in 35 years, and is a perfect wall poster. A booklet of explanatory information accompanies the map and includes an index of the map's many sources, which can be consulted for more detailed geologic information.

The map has been compiled from nearly 100 sources, including work from Idaho State University, the U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho Geological Survey and the University of Idaho.

"This map updates our understanding of Idaho geology," said Idaho State University geosciences Professor Paul K. Link. "It is a map that is of poster size, can hang on walls in schools and classrooms and brings Idaho geology and makes it accessible to the general public. It is also a very pretty, good-looking map."

"Anybody who dealing with natural history or geological hazards, from rivers to earthquakes, needs to refer to this map," Link said. "It contains the most recent information on a lot of these issues."

The map, its graphic cross sections of the Earth's crust and accompanying booklet on rock layers and layering represent 12 years of compilation and editing by Link, former ISU graduate student Sean P. Long (now at the University of Nevada, Reno), several ISU Geology masters students, plus Reed Lewis and Loudon Stanford of the Idaho Geological Survey.

The new map has its roots in ISU's Idaho Digital Atlas project, which was funded by an Idaho State Board of Education Technology Incentive Grant and a National Science Foundation grant.

The map is available locally for $20 at the Idaho Museum of Natural History gift shop, which is open Wednesday through Friday from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The store and museum will be closed from Dec. 24 through Jan. 1.

The map is also available from the Idaho Geological Survey in Moscow (208-885-7991, or www.idahogeology.org).

The Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center has a new set of wheels promoting its clinics and health mission, thanks to the El Korah Sand Duners Shriners of Boise

The Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center has a new set of wheels promoting its clinics and health mission, thanks to the El Korah Sand Duners Shriners of Boise.

In February 2011, the Shriners donated a 1997 Ford diesel vehicle to the Meridian campus. Campus administrators planned to spruce up the 22-passenger bus and transport student clinicians and faculty to off-site health screenings among other uses.

Well, the bus is finally ready to roll with a shiny new bus wrap in Bengal orange and black, encouraging the community to "Be Healthy" and visit ISU-Meridian clinics.

"We also intend to use the bus to transport adults with no insurance or limited access to preventive health care to our monthly Community Health Screenings in Ada County," said ISU-Meridian Academic Dean Bessie Katsilometes.

The screenings are held in partnership with Ada County, Central District Health and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

Katsilometes praised Meridian's three-year partnership with the El Korah Shriners. Since 2010, Shriners have held an annual free community screening on the Meridian campus to evaluate children who need treatment for orthopedic conditions, spinal cord injuries, burns and cleft palate.

The Communication Sciences and Disorders department will be a GOLD sponsor of Idaho Registry of Interpreters (RID) for the Deaf 40th Anniversary Conference in Twin Falls in April

The Communication Sciences and Disorders department will be a GOLD sponsor of Idaho Registry of Interpreters (RID) for the Deaf 40th Anniversary Conference in Twin Falls in April. Idaho RID is an affiliate chapter of a national membership organization representing the professionals who facilitate communication between people who are deaf or hard of hearing and people who hear. For more information contact Emily Turner; turnemil@isu.edu, or ext. 5341.