News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

August 13, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 29

Faculty/Staff Updates

Academic dean, Bessie Katsilometes, and Glenda Carr, assistant clinical pharmacy professor, presented an analysis of ISU-Meridian's Community Health Screenings at the National Association of Local Boards of Health 20th Annual Conference

Academic dean, Bessie Katsilometes, and Glenda Carr, assistant clinical pharmacy professor, presented an analysis of ISU-Meridian's Community Health Screenings at the National Association of Local Boards of Health 20th Annual Conference, Aug. 8-10, in Atlanta, Ga.

Katsilometes and Carr are based on the Meridian campus.

The presentation included two posters highlighting the innovative partnership between ISU-Meridian, Ada County, Central District Health and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

The health screenings began in March 2010, and clinicians have screened more than 400 uninsured adults in the Treasure Valley. Services include basic physical examinations and medication reviews; dental evaluations; HIV testing; hearing and depression screenings; flu shots; mammogram referrals; nutrition assessments, and preventive health information. Screenings are conducted by ISU clinical faculty, dental residents and student clinicians.

Screening organizers say identifying potential health problems early and referring patients to low-cost community clinics can eliminate costly visits to hospital emergency rooms. The health screenings also give ISU-Meridian students valuable clinical experience.

Idaho State University's Jason Harris was honored with the Elda E. Anderson Award at the 57th annual meeting of the Health Physics Society

Idaho State University's Jason Harris was honored with the Elda E. Anderson Award at the 57th annual meeting of the Health Physics Society held in Sacramento, Calif., in July.

Harris, who has been at ISU since 2008, is an associate professor of health physics in the ISU School of Engineering and assistant director for the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls.

The Elda E. Anderson Award is presented by the Health Physics Society to a young member of the Health Physics Society to recognize excellence in (1) research or development, (2) discovery or invention, (3) devotion to health physics, and/or (4) significant contributions to the profession of health physics.

"It was quite an honor and a privilege to accept the award," Harris said.

Harris, 38, said he received the award for a combination of award criteria, including his teaching, research and professional service.

Harris received his Bachelor of Science degree in biology and marine science from the University of Tampa in Tampa, Fla., graduating with honors in 1995. He earned his master's degree in nuclear engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne in 2002 and his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2007.

He has had a varied work background in a variety of fields. He has received recent recognition as 2012 Outstanding Young Alumnus Award - Purdue University, School of Health Sciences and 2012 IAEA International Nuclear Security Education Network Chair.

In addition, he continues to consult on nuclear power plant issues and is president of Harris HP Solutions, LLC. Harris already has an impressive record of innovative research on issues surrounding nuclear reactor and accelerator operations. His singular devotion to health physics is evident not only from his volunteer work for the Health Physics Society, American Nuclear Society, and other affiliated organizations, but also from his passion for teaching health physics.

Frieda Pickett, RDH, MS, recently published an article in the Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene

Frieda Pickett, RDH, MS, adjunct faculty in the MSDH Program recently published an article entitled "Clinical Practice Recommendations for Non Fluoride Anticaries Products: Review and Summary" in the Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene.

News Bites

The President of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, James Delaney, delivered the commencement address for the Physician Assistant Studies Class of 2012

The President of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, James Delaney, delivered the commencement address for the Physician Assistant Studies Class of 2012. The ceremony was Aug. 3 in the Jensen Grand Concert Hall of the Stephens Performing Arts Center, Pocatello. This was the sixteenth graduating class for the Department. A total of 59 graduates from Pocatello and Meridian received their MPAS degree.

The 2012 Walter A. Stein Award for Outstanding Preceptor was awarded to Dr. David McClusky of Twin Falls. Dr. McClusky has been a long-time supporter of the program and has served as Medical Director. Currently, he serves as the Alternate Supervising Physician for the Meridian campus. He trains students as a preceptor and provides lectures in surgery and the art of medicine. His approach to patient care along with his empathy has been perhaps the greatest teaching he has passed along to his students. The ISU PA program faculty, staff and students congratulated Dr. McClusky on this honor and thanked him for his tireless effort to train the next generation of health care providers.

The graduating class was also honored to have PA Gary Schumaker in attendance at graduation. Mr. Schumaker was the first PA in Idaho and assigned license PA-01 in 1974 by the Idaho State Board of Medicine. This was especially noteworthy because the 1000th Idaho PA license will be assigned in the next few months, most likely to a member of the Class of 2012. Schumaker is also credited with assisting legislators to design the first PA Practice Act. He was recognized for his service to Idaho health care for more than 35 years.

Children's "special places" are under the bed, in a cupboard, behind a chair or out in a hidden nook of the backyard. We can remember our own and can often identify some of the special places of our children

Children's "special places" are under the bed, in a cupboard, behind a chair or out in a hidden nook of the backyard. We can remember our own and can often identify some of the special places of our children.

Idaho State University education Assistant Professor Carie Green is analyzing the significant of these children's special places and the effect they have.

"These special places are important in children's development and developing a sense of autonomy," Green said. "They allow them to create their own world within yet separate from the adult world."

Green said this was the first study to identify the special places of pre-school aged children within the home environment from the perspective of children. In her published study "Exploring Young Children's Special Places" she identified four different types of special places: indoor, outdoor, other places and imaginary.

"The important part is that these are their places, free from adults," Green said. "They are hiding places, places to play and places to go to retreat. Adults need to respect them and some parents did foster a place for children to go."

She said understanding the significance of children's own places builds upon the importance of honoring children's sense of agency, as they develop their own identity. Parents reported children use their special places to have privacy, retreating to them to process emotions and emerging feeling better. The implications of the study are relevant to practitioners who work with children in a variety of fields including education, psychology, sociology and the health sciences.

For example, teachers can use their knowledge of special places to provide activities for children to execute in their own special places to help them develop different skills.

Green's study analyzed the special places of 31 3- to 5-year-olds who participated in the study's phase one at school. Eight children's homes, three boys and five girls, were visited during the second phase of the study.

"Kids didn't have just one special place, they have all kinds of special places that suited different needs," Green said.

Green identified 246 special places for the 31 study subjects, 158 indoor, 46 outdoor, 16 "other" and six imaginary. She recorded one "no special place."

"Most places were small in size and I was never invited in," Green said. "And the size of the space prevented my access. Some kids did not want to show their places. They shouldn't be forced to share about that space."

The most commonly mentioned indoor spots were in the closet, in the bedroom, under the bed, behind the couch and under the table. The most common outdoor spots were in the sandbox, the swings, under the tree and mountains/rocks.

"It is important to understand that kids need to separate themselves and be off in their own space and respect this," Green said.

Results of her study have been published in Children, Youth and Environment and International Journal of Early Childhood.

The first Great Idaho State University Ambush, an approximately 5-kilometer mud and obstacle team race, will be held Sept. 8 and early registration is due Aug. 12

The first Great Idaho State University Ambush, an approximately 5-kilometer mud and obstacle team race, will be held Sept. 8 and early registration is due Aug. 12.

"Get ready to bare your claws and dirty your paws for the first annual Great ISU Ambush," said Larissa Kimball, ISU recruitment specialist and a race organizer. "Get ready to slosh through mud pits, hurdle over hay walls, run through tires, and trek over the rugged ridge trails on the ISU campus."

The cost for early registration for four-member teams is $65 on or before Aug. 12. The late registration fee is $85 per team from Aug. 13 to Sept. 3. Day of race registration is $100. A portion of these funds will be used to support local charities. The race is sponsored by ISU Recruitment Services.

The race will begin at Bartz Field on the ISU Pocatello campus, near the new Miller Ranch Stadium. The course will feature 15 different obstacles and is designed to challenge participants' skills.

"You and your team will traverse the endless nets that will ensnare your ambush, slosh through bottomless mud pits designed to slow the track of any tiger, scale high walls, trudge the endless hill only to realize it's not over, and you'll have much, much more to finish," Kimball said. "You'll want to rely on each ambush member to get through all 15 obstacles."

For more information and to register for the event visit www.isu.edu/ambush/. More information is also available by calling ISU Recruitment Services at (208) 282-2122 or visiting the Great ISU Ambush Facebook page at www.facebook.com/IsuAmb.