News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

July 9, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 24

Faculty/Staff Updates

Faculty and alumni in the Department of Dental Hygiene have had a successful summer

Faculty and alumni in the Department of Dental Hygiene have had a successful summer.

Kathleen Hodges, RDH, MS, published an article entitled "Reduce the Bacterial Load" in the June issue of Dimensions of Dental Hygiene. Also, Kandis Garland, RDH, MS, faculty, and Elena Francisco, MSDH, RDHAP, alumnus, have been selected for the Peer Review Panel 2012 of Dimensions of Dental Hygiene.

All are invited to a retirement reception for Nancy Anthony, interlibrary loan library assistant, July 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Magnusen Alumni House, 921 S. 8th Avenue

All are invited to a retirement reception for Nancy Anthony, interlibrary loan library assistant, July 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Magnusen Alumni House, 921 S. 8th Avenue. Anthony is retiring after 42 years of service to the University.

All are invited to a retirement reception for Kim Robertson July 19, 8-10 a.m. in the Student Health Service Pharmacy waiting area

All are invited to a retirement reception for Kim Robertson July 19, 8-10 a.m. in the Student Health Service Pharmacy waiting area. Come and wish Robertson well. Light refreshments will be served.

News Bites

The Department of Counseling's Pocatello Counseling Clinic and the ISU Counseling and Testing Center will offer free counseling to any individual or family wanting support as they cope with loss and trauma caused by the Charlotte Fire

The Idaho State University Department of Counseling's Pocatello Counseling Clinic and the ISU Counseling and Testing Center will offer free counseling to any individual or family wanting support as they cope with loss and trauma caused by the Charlotte Fire.

The ISU Pocatello Counseling Clinic is located on the seventh floor of Garrison Hall on the ISU campus. The clinic phone number is 240-1609.

The ISU Testing and Counseling Center is located in Room 351 of Graveley Hall and its phone number is 282-2130.

Enjoy the music of singer/songwriter Steve Eaton and help feed Idaho's hungry during "An Evening with Steve Eaton," July 21, presented by the Alumni Association

Enjoy the music of singer/songwriter Steve Eaton and help feed Idaho's hungry during "An Evening with Steve Eaton," Saturday, July 21, presented by the Idaho State University Alumni Association.

The concert is from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Gates open at 5 p.m.

"The ISU Alumni Association is excited to present this concert. Steve is a Pocatello native and an ISU alumnus and his continued connection to and support for ISU is tremendous. To have this kind of partnership that will benefit the local community and Idaho Food bank is a bonus," said K.C. Felt, ISU alumni relations executive director.

Eaton, who attended ISU in the 1970s and now lives in Boise, has performed with Carole King and written songs for The Carpenters, Art Garfunkel and Lee Greenwood.

He has received two Emmy nominations for original music created for PBS television specials and has written music for the Nature Conservancy, National Wildlife Federation and the National Endowment for the Arts, according to Eaton's official website.

Admission is $20 per person. Order tickets and RSVP online at www.isusteveeaton.myevent.com.

Bring canned food for donation to the Boise area Idaho Food Bank and lawn chairs and blankets to sit on. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Coolers welcome inside the venue.

For more information, call 1-800-933-4781 or visit www.isu.edu/alumni.

Recent collaborations between the South Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and the ISU Idaho Accelerator Center underscore how the IAC has become the "world's go-to" facility for experts around the world who want to use atomic accelerators for the non-destructive detection of contraband

Recent collaborations between the South Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Idaho State University Idaho Accelerator Center underscore how, over the last 15 to 20 years, the IAC has become the "world's go-to" facility for experts around the world who want to use atomic accelerators for the non-destructive detection of contraband.

"The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute is trying to get into the business of developing accelerators for contraband detection," said Frank Harmon, senior scientist and former director of the IAC. "During the last year, South Korean scientists have been visiting our facilities and we've been sending our personnel over there."

Accelerators are machines that speed up sub-atomic particles and elementary particles such as electrons and protons. The IAC and its partners, including the Idaho National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the Department of Defense, Department of Energy and private companies, have developed portable accelerators that shoot radiation into cargo containers that can detect the presence of radioactive materials. The use of the accelerators is non-destructive. The IAC has its Inspection Technology Research and Development Laboratory at the Pocatello airport where the use of portable accelerators for detecting nuclear materials can be demonstrated.

The IAC, which annually attracts between $5 and $8 million in external grant funding (while only receiving about $100,000 from the state of Idaho for operational funding), has sent three of its people over to South Korea to help oversee the set up and operation of a new accelerator. The IAC personnel who have worked on the South Korean project include Kevin Folkman, head accelerator engineer, Chad O'Neill, accelerator operations supervisor, and Brian Berls, pulse power engineer.

Portable accelerators like the ones developed at the IAC can also be used for the non-destructive detection of nuclear materials that must be verified to satisfy new international treaties. Another use for this type of accelerator is for "attribution" if a nuclear weapon is detonated: nuclear materials have a unique "footprint" accelerators can detect, and then the source of the nuclear material used in a weapon can be traced.

"We're seeing a lot more excitement both nationally and internationally, about the use of portable accelerators for large-scale container examination," Harmon said. "This could lead to more collaborations and consultations like the kind we're now engaged in with the South Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute."

The IAC's expertise in accelerator and nuclear science has been recognized in another way in South Korea. For the last three years the IAC's Valeriia Straovoitova has been teaching at the World Nuclear University's School on Radiation Technologies held in Korea.The WNU Coordinating Centre in London organizes the event that is hosted by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety.

Straovoitova is an ISU research assistant professor and the project leader of the activation analysis and radioisotope research programs at the IAC. She is developing techniques for creating active isotopes and methods to analyze materials using these techniques. She is also working on production of medical isotopes for treatment and diagnosis of diseases, another expertise at the IAC.

"Dr. Straovoitova's participation in a school of this caliber speaks highly of the quality of scientists and technicians we have at the IAC," Harmon said.

More information on the IAC is available online at http://iac.isu.edu/.

Ryan A. Long, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences, was recently awarded the American Society of Mammalogists Fellowship

Ryan A. Long, a Ph.D. candidate in the Idaho State University Department of Biological Sciences, was recently awarded the American Society of Mammalogists Fellowship at its 92nd Annual Meeting in Reno, Nevada.

The fellowship is the highest honor the society bestows upon a graduate student. It includes a $15,000 prize and a gift of numerous scientific books and other publications.

Long's dissertation research is a comparative study of elk inhabiting a desert ecosystem at the Idaho National Laboratory in Southeast Idaho, and a mountainous environment at Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in Northeastern Oregon. He is using a bioenergetics approach to study effects of climatic variability on behavior and life-history characteristics of elk.

His Ph.D. research is supervised by ISU Department of Biological Sciences Professors R. Terry Bowyer and John G. Kie.

Long is expected to complete his dissertation next spring. He will also receive a minor in biology education. He has taught mammalogy at ISU and presented workshops on resource selection modeling for the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Long's accomplishments include nine peer-reviewed publications in the scientific literature as well as a book chapter. He also has been involved in 26 professional presentations at scientific meetings. He has received more than $200,000 in extramural support for his research. Long was also awarded the prestigious Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Fellowship from the Environmental Protection Agency, and two fellowships from the Shikar Safari Club.

Long obtained his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he received the Joel Wiegert Award for the Outstanding Graduating Senior Man in 2004. He received his Master of Science degree from the University of Idaho, working under the supervision of Dr. Janet L. Rachlow, and was awarded the Outstanding Graduate Student in Wildlife Resources in 2007. He began his Ph.D. studies at ISU in 2008.

"Ryan Long is a truly exceptional graduate student, with an original and cutting-edge research project that should advance our knowledge of elk ecology and management," Bowyer said. "I believe this award speaks to the quality of Ryan's research and our graduate program in the ISU Department of Biological Sciences."

Members of the ISU Chamber Choir completed a two-week singing tour in Europe this summer

Members of the Idaho State University Chamber Choir completed a two-week singing tour in Europe this summer.

The majority of the tour was spent in Italy, where the choral group performed at other concerts, masses and recitals in Rome, Siena, Florence, Lucca and Venice.

One of the biggest highlights of the trip was the choir performing at Saint Peter's Basilica, located within Vatican City, which has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world and is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic sites.

Freshman John Punt, 19 of Idaho Falls, added his take on this performance.

"I've never performed in a setting on the scale of St. Peters Basilica," said John Punt, ISU freshman who was on the trip. "Being in such a great hall like that was amazing."

The choir finished its tour with a four-day stay in Innsbruck, Austria, to participate in the Eph Ehly, The Passion Within Choral Festival, which featured four other U.S. university choirs touring Europe.

In order to assist our ISU faculty and staff directly impacted by the Charlotte Fire, ISU is prepared to grant paid administrative leave for time off work for those in need in order to deal with issues as a result of the fire

In order to assist our ISU faculty and staff directly impacted by the Charlotte Fire, ISU is prepared to grant paid administrative leave for time off work for those in need in order to deal with issues as a result of the fire.

On a case-by-case basis, an employee must complete a paper time-sheet with a notation of the specific time off work and the reason for the administrative leave, then submit the time-sheet to the supervisor and department director / dean for recommended approval. The department / college must submit the time-sheet to David Miller, director of human resources, for final approval prior to normal time-sheet processing deadlines.

Please contact the Office of Human Resources if you have any questions.

Idaho State of Mind, a 30-minute weekly public affairs television program produced by ISU debuts on "This East Idaho" television network beginning Wednesday, July 18 at 5:30 p.m.

Idaho State of Mind, a 30-minute weekly public affairs television program produced by Idaho State University debuts on "This East Idaho" television network beginning Wednesday, July 18 at 5:30 p.m. The program, which initially airs over Idaho Public Television every Saturday afternoon at 12:30 p.m. is hosted and anchored by Libby Wood, respected television anchorwoman. ISU students under the direction of Tom Hallaq, assistant professor of mass communications produce the majority of the program's content.

"Utilizing the expertise and resources provided by ISU faculty and staff, the program examines current issues that impact people wherever they live, work or go to school. The topics and issues are applicable to common problems or issues we all face in our daily lives," according to Mark N. Levine, one of the program's creators.