News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

April 30, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 16

News Bites

ISU-Meridian will confer 195 degrees Monday, May 7

Melanie Person has always been fascinated with psychology. When she graduated from high school in 1995, a teacher wrote in her yearbook, "I look forward to discussing psychoanalysis with you in the future, Dr. Person."

Well, she's ready for that discussion. Person is receiving her doctorate in counselor education and counseling Monday, May 7 during Idaho State University-Meridian's commencement ceremony. It starts at 6 p.m. at the Boise Centre, 850 W. Front Street. ISU-Meridian will confer 195 degrees-the majority in the health professions and health sciences.

Dr. Ted Epperly, the chief executive and program director of the Family Medicine Residency of Idaho, will deliver the commencement address.

Person says completing her counseling doctorate is an important part of her professional journey. "It means everything to me. I love what I do," she said, noting a doctorate will enable her to teach advanced courses in counselor education at the university level.

She is also one of seven ISU-Meridian students nominated for the campus' Student Excellence Award, which celebrates academic excellence, community service and research. Students are nominated by department faculty, and the top honoree will be announced at commencement.

The other student nominees are:

Also recognized at commencement will be nursing student Michael Shafer, recipient of a 2012 Outstanding Student Achieve Award; physician assistant studies clinical assistant professor Jared Papa, recipient of the university's 2012 ISU Distinguished Service Award; and Galen Louis, director of ISU's Master of Public Health Program, recipient of a 2012 Outstanding Master Teacher Award.

Here's the breakdown of graduate, professional and undergraduate degrees: one Doctor of Philosophy; seven Doctor of Audiology; 24 Doctor of Pharmacy; 7 Master of Counseling; one Master of Education; nine Master of Physical Education/Athletic Administration; 30 Master of Physician Assistant Studies; one Master of Public Health; 46 Master of Science; 61 Bachelor of Science; and seven Associate of Science degrees.

Disciplines include medical laboratory science, counseling, nursing, communication sciences and disorders, sign-language studies and paramedic science.

The ISU-Meridian Health Science Center offers more than 20 programs in the health professions.

The National Science Foundation has awarded Steve Shropshire $247,732 through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program to support undergraduate research

The National Science Foundation has awarded Idaho State University physics Professor and Principal Investigator Steve Shropshire $247,732 through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program to support undergraduate research.

Eight undergraduate students from across the United States will be selected from 113 applications to participate each year for three years in a 10-week nuclear physics, radiobiology, and nuclear engineering research and education experience at ISU. This year, one of the eight students selected is from ISU.

"Competition for this award was highly competitive," Shropshire said. "The NSF awarded ISU this grant because of the unique and internationally recognized interdisciplinary programs and laboratories in applied nuclear science."

His Co-Principal Investigator was Department of Biological Sciences Associate Professor Linda DeVeaux, who is also an affiliate faculty in the Department of Physics.

Students will participate in various research projects, ranging from the production of medical isotopes to issues concerning Homeland Security and gene expression responses which may lead to improved cancer therapy.

"We are excited," continued Shropshire, "to host fine students from across the United States to foster interest and enthusiasm in experimental scientific research. ISU has a successful track record in involving undergraduates in cutting-edge research."

This program will provide talented undergraduate students with valuable experience in progressive research and development at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) and associated laboratories in the departments of physics, biological sciences, chemistry and anthropology at Idaho State University.

For information on the NSF REU Program, see http://www.nsf.gov/, and for more information on the ISU REU Program, including application materials, see http://www.physics.isu.edu/internships/reu.html or contact Dr. Steve Shropshire at shropshi@physics.isu.edu, or 282-2212.

Since 2002, ISU's Bengal Dancers have been placing in the top 10 in national competitions

Since 2002, Idaho State University's Bengal Dancers have been placing in the top 10 in national competitions. This season, coach Kolissa Manchan's second year with the team, the dancers earned high marks at two national competitions this spring.

"We competed in both jazz and hip-hop," said Manchan of the team's involvement in the USA Collegiate Cheerleading and Dance Championships in Anaheim, Calif.

The dancers placed fifth in hip-hop and second in jazz. Later in the season, the dancers placed third in hip-hop and second in jazz at the National Cheerleaders Association/National Dance Alliance Collegiate Cheer and Dance Championship in Daytona Beach, Fla. There, the dancers won the Innovative Choreography award for their division and were the only team in their division to place in the top three with both routines.

"It makes such a difference when the dancers are all in sync and dance as one," she said. "They wanted to dance and they love to dance and you could see it whenever they danced."

In addition to competitions, the dancers also performed at all home football and both men's and womens basketball games as well as "a volleyball game, soccer game and a couple of rugby games."

"The dancers have to deal with a very long season," Manchan said. "They start the year going to camp in mid-July and then practice before school starts.until our last competition in mid-April. You can imagine the toll it takes on them."

Though school spirit and competitions are important for the dancers, Manchan also focused on team-building and community outreach.

"This year I tried to not only work on school spirit and competition, I also wanted to work on the morale of the team and the relationship of the team and community," she said. "I am proud to say we volunteered at the Idaho Food Bank.and served lunch at the soup kitchen, along with donating Christmas stockings with presents in them for the kids at the Bannock House."

According to Manchan, the dancers perform this community service in addition to practices, performances and competitions, and maintain full-time credits while keeping up their grades. Despite this, Manchan said they only receive "a small scholarship."

"We welcome any financial support the community would like to contribute to help the dancers. We also want to thank all the businesses and community members that do help them with all their sponsorships," she said.

Three ISU students, Chelsey Gasser, Ben Howard and Colette Redden, from the Idaho Falls campus have planned a charity concert for The Haven Shelter on Friday, May 4

Three Idaho State University students, Chelsey Gasser, Ben Howard and Colette Redden, from the Idaho Falls campus have planned a charity concert for The Haven Shelter on Friday, May 4, at the Red Lion Hotel located at 475 River Parkway in Idaho Falls.

Doors will open at 7 p.m. and entertainment will begin at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $5.

Local bands 2am Logic, On Slaught and Gutter will perform at the event. There will also be a raffle.

The Haven Shelter is a transitional shelter for homeless families and single women, in Idaho Falls.

The concert is an all-ages event; however, there will be a beer garden available to attendees who are over 21. These attendees will be required to show ID at the door.

The students planned the benefit as part of their First Year Seminar class, which teaches students the value of service-learning projects. All proceeds from the event will go The Haven Shelter's GED program, which offers free GED testing and tutoring to all adults without a high school equivalency or diploma.

According to Gasser, the group was originally working on a 5k Fun Run, but difficulties with an outside collaborator caused the project to fall through. She said the next logical step was to organize the concert, as two of her cousins are members of 2am Logic.

"The best part is knowing all of our proceeds will go to the GED program," Gasser said. "It's great to help other students pursue an education."

"I am so impressed with these students willingness to go above and beyond what is typically required of this class," said Julie Thompson, an employee at the Idaho Falls campus Counseling and Testing Center.

The Idaho Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, together with the Institute of Rural Health, have scheduled a statewide videoconference May 9 to increase awareness and understanding of the mental health needs of Idaho's children and teens

The Idaho Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, together with the Idaho State University Institute of Rural Health, have scheduled a statewide videoconference May 9 to increase awareness and understanding of the mental health needs of Idaho's children and teens.

As part of Children's Mental Health Week, May 6 -12, and Children's Mental Health Day on May 9,, the free videoconference from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. MDT (2-5 p.m. PDT) will be accessible at the offices of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare in all Idaho regions.

Pre-registration is required. To pre-register, go to www.isu.edu/irh. Seating is limited so participants are advised to pre-register early. Certificates of completion will be offered to professionals to submit to their licensing boards.

Three presentations on bullying, stigma associated with mental illnesses, and art therapy are scheduled. Ann Kirkwood, MA, director of Idaho State University's youth suicide prevention project at the Institute of Rural Health, Meridian Health Science Center, will discuss "The Consequences of Mental Illness Stigma: Impacting Help-Seeking for Children and Teens" (3 p.m.). Judy Herman, M.Ed., LPC, a Meridian School District counselor, will present "Bully Blocking. Anyone Can Be A Hero" (4 p.m.) Lisa Williams, ATR, LCPC, an art therapist at the Warm Springs Counseling Center in Boise will present "Art Therapy: A Hopeful Method of Recovery" (5 p.m.).

The videoconference will be offered at the following locations.

For information about the videoconference, contact the Federation of Families at 208-433-8845. For questions about pre-registration, contact Kirsti Beck at ISU-IRH, beckkirs@isu.edu, or 208-282-4436.

The Parking Office operating system is undergoing several major changes over the next few months

The Parking Office operating system is undergoing several major changes over the next few months. We are upgrading our eBusiness site to the most current version to improve online permit sales, and we are also adopting a new citation payments module that will improve online citation payments by making them less complicated and more user-friendly.

All of these changes will be implemented over the next few months and then will be in place by mid-June. As a result of these changes, reserved permits will be available to faculty and staff online and in the Parking Office on July 1.

In order to accommodate those faculty and staff members who will be out of town or without Internet access during the summer break, reserved permits will not be available to students until 10 days after the fall semester begins.