News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

April 2, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 12

Faculty/Staff Updates

Dr. Cartwright is just back from the mid-year conference in Panama City, Panama, with the current doctoral fellows being supported by the InterAmerican Foundation

Dr. Cartwright is just back from the mid-year conference in Panama City, Panama, with the current doctoral fellows being supported by the InterAmerican Foundation. Dr. Cartwright has been a member of the academic review committee for the IAF for the past three years. In this capacity she, along with four other experts in grassroots development in Latin America, choose and mentors twelve doctoral students from top universities in the US. The Inter-American Foundation (IAF) was created in 1969 by the United States Congress to fund the self-help initiatives of the organized poor in Latin America and the Caribbean and the groups that directly support them. The IAF disseminates research findings of its Fellows to a broad audience concerned with development. The IIE has partnered with the IAF to administer its Grassroots Development Fellowship Program. http://www.iie.org/en/Programs/IAF-Grassroots-Development-Fellowship-Program

The IIE also administers the Fulbright programs.

This year's midyear conference was in Panama City and included at site visit to an Embera Indian community on the Chagras River. This community was funded by the IAF to create a sustainable crafts business that would also promote local culture and community well-being.

Jenny Lynne Semenza, Associate University Librarian for Public Services was named as an Innovator for Library Journal's Movers & Shakers 2012

Jenny Lynne Semenza, Associate University Librarian for Public Services was named as an Innovator for Library Journal's Movers & Shakers 2012 http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/03/people/movers-shakers/movers-shakers-2012/.

Several dental hygiene faculty members have recently published articles and presented workshops

Kathleen O. Hodges, RDH, MS, Professor in the Department of Dental Hygiene recently published a paper on "Restore Periodontal Health" in the February issue of Dimensions of Dental Hygiene.

JoAnn R. Gurenlian, RDH, PhD, professor and interim graduate program director, Department of Dental Hgiene, co-presented two workshops with Ann E. Spolarich, RDH, PhD, entitled "Creating an International Online Doctoral Program in Dental Hygiene" at the American Dental Education Association Annual Session on March 20 and 21, 2012 in Orlando, Florida.

Ellen J. Rogo, RDH, PhD, associate professor, and Leciel K. Bono, RDH, BS and graduate student, Department of Dental Hygiene, co-presented a workshop entitled "Engage Students in Legislative Advocacy" at the American Dental Education Association Annual Session on March 18, 1012, in Orlando, Florida.

Ellen J. Rogo and Colleen Stephenson, RDH, BS, and graduate student, in the Department of Dental Hygiene, co-presented a TechExpo entitled "Using Hands-Free Computer Technology in Education to Enhance Patient Care" at the American Dental Education Association Annual Session on March 20, 2012, in Orlando, Florida.

Karen E. Kearns, Head of Special Collections and University Archives at Idaho State University's Eli M. Oboler Library, passed away March 21, 2012 in Pocatello, Idaho

Karen E. Kearns, Head of Special Collections and University Archives at Idaho State University's Eli M. Oboler Library, passed away March 21, 2012 in Pocatello, Idaho.

Karen was a graduate of Idaho State University (B.A., 1987) and the University of Kentucky (M.L.S., 1990). Prior to completing her degree at Kentucky, Karen went to work for the Huntington Research Library in San Marino, California, where she became the Curator for Western and Women's History Manuscripts. In 1997, Karen joined the staff at ISU's Eli M. Oboler Library and in 2001 she became the Head of Special Collections and University Archives.

While Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Karen cataloged significant collections, including the Nellie Cline Steenson, George Shoup and Edward Stevenson collections. She spearheaded the creation of the Bannock County Images, Edward Stevenson Collection and Birch Creek Massacre digital projects. Her tenure in the department also included overseeing the processing of the largest manuscript collection housed at ISU, the Richard H. Stallings Congressional Collection.

In addition to her many professional accomplishments, Karen served on the Idaho State University Faculty Senate, the Historic Preservation Commission for the City of Pocatello, and as a board member for the Idaho Center for the Book. She also held leadership positions with the Conference of Intermountain Archivists and the Friends of Oboler Library. Her service to Idaho State University was matched by her service to her community."

News Bites

The College of Education will host a Graduate Programs Open House Thursday, April 5, for those interested in pursuing a master's degree in education

Idaho State University's College of Education will host a Graduate Programs Open House Thursday, April 5, for those interested in pursuing a master's degree in education.

The open house will run from 6 to 8 p.m. in the College of Education lobby. The event is free.

Representatives will be on hand from financial aid, admissions and each graduate program to field any questions or concerns attendees may have. Those in attendance will also have the opportunity to meet with department professors, as well as College of Education Dean Deborah Hedeen.

Refreshments will be served, and door prizes and raffle drawings will be given away, including classroom supplies, coffee gift cards and children's books.

You are invited to participate in the first of three Community Meetings to integrate the ISU Campus Master Plan into guiding campus development for the next 15 years

You are invited to participate in the first of three Community Meetings to integrate the Idaho State University Campus Master Plan into guiding campus development for the next 15 years.

The meeting is set for April 10, 6 p.m. in Rendezvous Room 203.

At the meeting, participants will be introduced to the Master Plan, its purpose and its timing, and have the opportunity to provide input on what the plan should accomplish. This is an open forum with a broad group of stakeholders, and all ideas are welcome.

New Knowledge Adventures, a lifelong learning program for people older than 50, has reached record enrollment in Pocatello and has room to grow

New Knowledge Adventures, a lifelong learning program for people older than 50, has reached record enrollment in Pocatello and has room to grow.

"In fall 2011 we hit our 400 mark, and we have 417 people registered for NKA classes this spring," said Shirley McElprang, management assistant for the ISU Division of Continuing Education and Conference Services, which provides administrative support and classroom space for the program.

"But, even though we're at record enrollment, a lot of people out there still don't know about the program," she added. "It's a great program, with plenty of options for participants."

This spring NKA is offering 114 classes on a variety of topics. The cost to register is $40, which gains admission to all classes, but classes have size limits and signup is required for individual classes.

"We have lecture-style classes and activity classes like wood carving, line dancing and square dancing," McElprang said. "And we have day trips like the ones we had to Chesterfield or to the Evanston railway, as well as a multi-day trip to Yellowstone in January."

Participants and instructors come from a variety of backgrounds. New Knowledge Adventures at ISU is a member-directed organization for adults of retirement age to expand knowledge and explore new ideas in an informal, noncompetitive environment.

"People 50 years and older can register, and we have people in their 80s and 90s who are taking classes," McElprang said. "Our instructors are all volunteers. Some instructors are from ISU and some are from the INL. We've had presenters from the Pocatello Zoo and City of Pocatello, and both the mayors from Pocatello and Chubbuck have done presentations. We've had presenters from Fort Hall, too."

NKA offers courses during the fall and spring. NKA classrooms are in the Idaho State University Continuing Education Building, 1001 N. 7th, in Pocatello.

"NKA has helped furnish our Room 125 to make it more user friendly," McElprang said. "It now has three new projectors and screens, and a sound system. NKA has been an asset for our department."

For more information on NKA, which will continue offering new classes through late May, visit www.isu.edu/dce/nka/, call McElprang at 208-282-2789 or email extendedlearning@isu.edu.

The College of Pharmacy has won first place in the national competition for Operation Diabetes from the American Pharmacists Association

The Idaho State University College of Pharmacy has won first place in the national competition for Operation Diabetes from the American Pharmacists Association (APhA).

Operation Diabetes is a student outreach program that involves screening the public for diabetes and offering education on management of the disease. A screening can involve a blood glucose test, blood pressure check, cholesterol check and individualized counseling. Student Pharmacists partner with other student health-care providers to offer collaborative patient care services. Participants are then given information or referred to a health care professional for further help.

"These services are offered for free and are paid for by the students through fundraising efforts and donations," said Paul Cady, Dean of the College of Pharmacy. "Students participate in health screenings throughout Southeast Idaho and the Treasure Valley. The services have been offered in English and Spanish."

The annual report of these efforts submitted to the APhA is judged for the competition. ISU has won the regional recognition many times, but this is the first time it has won first place in the national level competition.

Operation Diabetes is just one of the outreach projects that the College of Pharmacy students participate in. Other programs include Operation Heart, Operation Immunization, Heartburn Awareness, Meth Awareness and Poison Prevention. Through these efforts, students at the College of Pharmacy deliver direct patient care to 4,000 people every year and more than 120,000 people are reached annually through all of the College's community education efforts.

"Every blood pressure check, every blood glucose monitoring, every immunization makes a difference," Cady said. "It benefits the patient but also helps create a compassionate, well-educated pharmacist that is invested in patient health."

ISU's Sport Science and Physical Education students are putting on a triathlon April 20-21 to celebrate the end of the school year, while benefitting Tyson's Brave Battalion, a local group of children who are battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Idaho State University's Sport Science and Physical Education students are putting on a triathlon April 20-21 to celebrate the end of the school year, while benefitting Tyson's Brave Battalion, a local group of children who are battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

The triathlon, also known as the Bengal Spring Sprint Triathlon, will start in Reed Gym on the ISU campus.

The Bengal Triathlon, sponsored by Idaho Central Credit Union and Idaho Orthopedic & Sports Clinic, is perfect for beginner and intermediate triathletes, according to organizers. The swim takes place on Friday night at the ISU Reed Gym pool, between 3 and 8 p.m. The bike and run portions will be on Saturday with the fastest swimmer off at 9:30 a.m. Racers will leave according to their swim time.

Organizers say the event is a great start to the triathlon season and it features awesome race sweatshirts, however, only those that register by April 1 will be guaranteed a sweatshirt. After the run, awards will be given and a raffle will take place for all participants.

Registration is available online at Active.com, (keywords Bengal Triathlon.) Registration fees are: $25 for individual race entries, $20 for college students, $60 for relay teams, $20 for juniors, and $15 for ICE/Pocatello TRI Club Members.

"The Bengal Triathlon is an event that brings ISU students together to work as a team, to gain foremost experience in their field of interest, to bring a community together that supports one cause, and to achieve in reaching our goals as individuals," Kyle Little, the race director, stated.

Karen Appleby's ISU Physical Education 4454 class was given the assignment to organize the triathlon to help teach class members the inner workings of the field of sports management. Students are managing all aspects of the race including race logistics, risk management, marketing and promotions.

To bring more meaning to what the students were doing, the class decided that all the proceeds would go to Tyson's Brave Battalion to help pay for travel expenses for children in our area with Acute Lymphoblatic Leukemia, who must travel to various regional facilities for treatment.

Amy Johnson, Tyson's mother, said, "It means a lot to us that people in the community care about the kids. Parents of children with cancer are usually emotionally and financially exhausted, so we can use all of the help we can get."

Another way to make the fun run worthwhile is to give away free items. Every participant will receive a sweatshirt, and a raffle ticket for a large amount of donated prizes from businesses in the community.

For more information, please contact Leo Sepulveda, Marketing and Promotions at 208-317-5692 sepuleon@gmail.com or Kyle Little, Race Director at 208-731-9753 littkyle@isu.edu or Dr. Caroline Faure at 208-282-4085 faurcaro@isu.edu.

The university community will be honoring 2011-2012 Career Path Internship participants and their mentors April 11

The university community will be honoring 2011-2012 Career Path Internship participants and their mentors April 11, 5-7 p.m. in the Wood River Room. Appetizers and refreshments will be served.

ISU will host the annual Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association Conference April 12-14

Idaho State University will host the annual Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association Conference (RMMRA) April 12-14, which will include the keynote address "Contested Categories, Anxiety, and Resistance in Early English and Beyond" by Anonette diPaolo Healey, editor of the Dictionary of Old English.

The conference is held annually at universities across the West, and is a venue for scholars and researchers to discuss this fascinating period.

The RMMRA is an interdisciplinary association of faculty, students and research centers in the West. In recent years the conference has been held in Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, Tempe, Ariz. and Flagstaff, Ariz.

The conference theme, "Categorizing the Medieval and Renaissance Worlds," was designed to help scholars think through the definitions they use in their research, while offering a means to explore how period thinkers organized the natural and geographic world around them.

Healey will deliver her address at 5:30 p.m. Friday, April 13, in the Rendezvous Complex Planetarium, Room 203. Her talk will be followed by a reception at 6:30 p.m. the Rendezvous Complex Suites. Her talk and reception are sponsored by the Idaho Humanities Council.

Healey will speak about how an adjective such as 'hard' has a long and distinguished history, an intoxicating richness that helps us to imagine its Anglo-Saxon past. But, she asks, can we detect the concerns of the culture through the use of this adjective? How can it act as a lens for the social, political, and religious issues within medieval society? This presentation will search the hidden history of "hard" to discern what our English-speaking ancestors found "hard to bear."

Healey is the editor of the innovative and fantastically detailed Dictionary of Old English, an ongoing project at the University of Toronto. The Dictionary of Old English defines the vocabulary of the first six centuries (600-1150 AD) of the English language, using 21st-century technology.

The conference typically attracts 50-75 participants and is open to the general public. The College of Arts and Letters hopes to extend the audience to local teachers, students and interested community members.

The conference, organized by Professors Thomas Klein and Curtis Whitaker of the ISU Department of English and Philosophy, is supported by grants from the Idaho Humanities Council and the College of Arts and Letters.

For more information on other conference events, contact Thomas Klein, kleithom@isu.edu, or visit the website of the Department of English and Philosophy http://www.isu.edu/english/conf2012/.

ISU will host Africa Night 2012 with the theme, "A Night Under the African Stars" April 7

Idaho State University will host Africa Night 2012 with the theme, "A Night Under the African Stars' April 7 at 5:30 p.m. inside the Jensen Grand Concert Hall at the Stephens Performing Arts Center.

The event is open to the public and will include authentic African delicacies, a flag and fashion show, singing, dancing, poetry and much more. Ticket prices are $7 for ISU students with a valid Bengal card, $8 for faculty and staff, $9 for the general public and free for children five and younger. Tickets can be purchased in advance at the Pond Student Union and will cost $1 more at the door on the night of the event.

For more information call 282-2700 or email larrydymes@gmail.com.

Greg Finch, our TIAA-CREF Representative, will be on campus April 10 and 11, in the HR Conference Room (Rm 312) in the Administration Building

Greg Finch, our TIAA-CREF Representative, will be on campus April 10 and 11, in the HR Conference Room (Rm 312) in the Administration Building.

Please call 800-732-8353, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., to schedule an appointment.

ISU will host the "Symposium on Indigenous Languages: Retention and Revitalization," geared to increase discussion and awareness of the issues concerning indigenous language loss, April 10-12

Idaho State University will host the "Symposium on Indigenous Languages: Retention and Revitalization," geared to increase discussion and awareness of the issues concerning indigenous language loss, April 10-12 in the Rendezvous Complex Suites A-C.

Even though federal legislation exists protecting Native languages and Executive Orders have been issued by Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama reiterating that language and culture are to be part of the education provided for American Indian children in the United States, this information is widely unknown or afforded in public schools. Speakers will provide many answers concerning this area of inquiry for those who attend, with opportunities for discussion for participants.

The symposium's original speaker lineup has changed and the schedule below reflects those changes. Reservations for the April 11 luncheon need to be made by April 3 to Rebecca Clover at 282- 2629 or clovrebe@isu.edu before April 3.

Languages around the world are disappearing at a fantastic rate, especially indigenous languages in areas where European nations took control, according to Beverly Klug, ISU education professor and a symposium organizer. The idea that every indigenous person should speak only the language of those who were now in power had its beginnings in the doctrine of "Doctrine of Discovery," which gave power to the Church and European monarchs over the lands and peoples of non-Christian countries in the service of the Christian God.

In the United States this was followed by the concept of "Manifest Destiny," again including this idea that subjugation of Native peoples was the ultimate goal of the government, and that this included eliminating Tribal languages. Educational systems became the tool by which this process was to occur. After it was apparent that this policy proved to be disastrous for Native peoples, plunging them into a world where they were unable to communicate with their own family members and, in general, not accepted as equal to Euro-Americans, the government reversed its course in the late 1920s following an investigation by Lewis Meriam and his team (referred to as the "1928 Meriam Report").

In trying to protect their Native languages, indigenous peoples in the United States found a strong leader in Patricia Ann Locke, Lakota and Chippewa, who grew up on the Ft. Hall Shoshone-Bannock Reservation. Among her decades of working as an educator from elementary to the university levels, she advocated strongly for Native rights in education. She was responsible for pushing for legislation for the preservation of indigenous languages. In 1991, she won a MacArthur Foundation fellowship for her work to save Tribal languages that were on the brink of extinction. Locke passed away in 2001.

The symposium is supported in part by a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council, a state-based program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visit www.idahohumanities.org for more information on the Idaho Humanities Council.

Other sponsors include the ISU College of Education, ISU College of Arts and Letters, Department of Anthropology, the ISU Office of Research, and the ISU Cultural Affairs Council.

Additional members of the symposium committee are Christopher Loether, ISU anthropology professor; Drusilla Gould, Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Member and senior lecturer, ISU Department of Anthropology; and Sherice Gould, Language and Cultural Preservation Department Manager, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.

"The Sacred Work of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren" is the topic of a presentation by nationally known author Elaine K. Williams at noon April 13

"The Sacred Work of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren" is the topic of a presentation by nationally known author Elaine K. Williams at noon April 13 in the Idaho State University Rendezvous Complex, Room 111.

Continuing education units are available for social workers and counselors who attend the presentation that is free and open to the public.

Williams, who lives in Lathrup Village, Mich., is the author of a book by the same title as her presentation. She has also authored many journal articles and professional manuals on the topic of kinship care. She also writes curriculum for the Corporation for National and Community Service. For more information on Williams or her book, visit http://www.elainekwilliams.com/.

Some of the topics her presentation will focus on are generational gap; how the environment of today versus the environment the grandparents grew up in strains the ability for each to understand the other, since their worlds are so different. However the different generations must find the way to communicate with each other on behalf of children. She will discuss the different generations, including the current generation of Millenials and the previous generations, such as the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers and the Gen Xers.

Williams will also address the adult children who are not raising their own children due to alienation, addiction, criminal activity, teen pregnancy and other factors.

"This is almost a lost generation in the sense that they are easily judged and seen as irresponsible," Williams said. "Yet, there numbers are huge and the likelihood that their children will struggle with the deep scars of abuse, abandonment, and rejection, becoming alienated themselves is very high."

"When you add the 8 million children being raised by 2.7 million grandparents and other relatives," she added, "plus the millions of adult parents not raising their children, we begin to see what a severe impact this has on the family as the foundation of our society."

She will also discuss the topic of Chapter 3 in her book, "Why Aren't My Parents Raising Me?"

Williams' presentation is sponsored by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and the ISU Department of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice. For more information or to register for CEUs call 208-282-3377.

Michael S. Reidy, a historian of science at Montana State University, will present "How Mountaineering Changed Science" Tuesday, April 17

Michael S. Reidy, a historian of science at Montana State University, will present "How Mountaineering Changed Science" Tuesday, April 17, at Idaho State University.

The free event will take place at 7 p.m. in the Wood River Room of the Pond Student Union.

Reidy's presentation will take attendees back to 1861, the Golden Age of Mountaineering, to follow 19th century physicist John Tyndall's first ascent of the Weisshorn in the Swiss Alps.

Reidy is the author of "Tides of History: Ocean Science and Her Majesty's Navy" among other publications.

The presentation has been brought to ISU by the Outdoor Adventure Center and the Department of History.