News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 19, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 11

Faculty/Staff Updates

ISU economics Professor Scott Benson is the president-elect of the national Faculty Athletics Representative Association and will serve a term as president beginning in November

Idaho State University economics Professor Scott Benson is the president-elect of the national Faculty Athletics Representative Association and will serve a term as president beginning in November.

FARA, according to its mission statement, is a "faculty voice ensuring balance between academics and athletics for the benefit of the student-athlete," which is devoted to academic integrity within university athletics programs, the well being of student athletes and institutional control of athletic programs.

"FARA plays an important role in shaping legislation toward the NCAA and whose input is sought out," Benson said. "It is an organization that does not have an ax to grind, and thinks athletics is a crucial part of the academic experience. We see athletes in several roles, both as athletes and students."

Benson has been active within the organization since 1999 as a representative for the ISU and assisted in ISU's recent NCAA accreditation. Last year he held the post of Vice President of FARA Division I, which oversees both Football Championship and Football Bowl Subdivisions.

"We try to make sure that the institution is complying with NCAA regulations both in the spirit and the letter of the law," he said. "We're here to promote student-athlete welfare, to certify their eligibility."

FARA is the Faculty Athletics Representatives Association, the professional association for faculty athletics FARA is the collective voice of faculty athletics representatives in all three NCAA divisions. It is FARA's role to advocate for faculty athletics representatives and to represent their concerns at the national level. For more information on FARA, visit http://www.farawebsite.org/.

News Bites

The ISU Health Fair 2012 is set for Thursday and Friday, March 22-23, and will feature more than 60 learning centers on a variety of health issues and blood draws

The Idaho State University Health Fair 2012 - celebrating its 32nd year - is scheduled from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday and Friday, March 22-23, and will feature more than 60 learning centers on a variety of health issues and blood draws.

"We have groups from the AARP to Portneuf Weight Management Group offering health tips, information and screenings at this year's ISU Health Fair," said Steve Wright, fair organizer. "This is an excellent opportunity for the Southeast Idaho and campus communities to explore ways to improve and maintain health."

Examples of services offered at the fair include everything from body-fat screenings and tests of grip strength, to nervous system evaluations and home health and hospice information. Other learning centers will provide blood pressure readings and hearing screening tests, to name a few. For complete information on the fair visit www.isu.edu/healthfair.

The ISU School of Nursing will have 12 learning centers at the fair, examining everything from stroke prevention and pulmonary health to bone health and foot assessment. Other ISU entities with learning centers at the fair include the Family Medicine Clinical Research Center, audiology, dental hygiene, pharmacy, occupational therapy, Idaho Life Sciences Library and physical therapy. They'll be available for consultation on a variety of health-related topics.

The annual free Health Fair is sponsored by the ISU Division of Health Sciences and Portneuf Medical Center. It will be held in the ISU Pond Student Union Ballroom.

Portneuf Medical Center (PMC) will provide laboratory services and blood draws at the fair on March 22-23. Blood draws are also be available on a walk-in basis from 7 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday through March 30 at the PMC lab located at 777 Hospital Way with access to the lab through the main entrance. A 14-hour fast is required prior to a blood draw for the lipid profile and general chemistry profile.

Participants who had their blood drawn on or before March 16 can pick up their blood profile results at the ISU Health Fair where health care professionals will help interpret results. If you have your blood drawn after March 16 or at the Health Fair, your results will be mailed to you.

PMC offers a general health blood profile for $35. The screening will include a chemistry profile, assessments for cardiac risk based on cholesterol levels, a complete blood count and a thyroid screen. Optional tests include a $15 confidential HIV screening and a $15 prostate antigen test. Other tests that will be offered this year include thyroid function screen for $15, iron level for $5, uric acid level for $5, glycohemoglobin for $25; insulin level for $25; and vitamin D level, a test for osteoporosis, $17.

On the day of the Health Fair during fair hours attendees can park in the Pond Student Union parking lot.

For more information, contact Stephen Wright, wrigstep@isu.edu or 208-282-2325.

Noted freshwater ecologist Alex Huryn, from the University of Alabama Department of Biological Sciences, will deliver the fifth annual G.W. Minshall Lecture Series in Ecology April 12

Noted freshwater ecologist Alex Huryn, from the University of Alabama Department of Biological Sciences, will deliver the fifth annual G.W. Minshall Lecture Series in Ecology at 4 p.m. April 12.

He will deliver the lecture "Postcards for the edge; extreme habitats as tools for ecological inquiry" in Room 10 of the ISU Department of Biological Sciences Lecture Center.

Huryn has a strong interest in how local, landscape, and regional factors affect the structure and productivity of freshwater communities, stream communities in particular. Over the past few decades, he has been involved in a number of collaborative studies addressing the relationship between ecosystem productivity and geomorphology, regional geology, invasive species, amphibian declines, river-floodplain linkages, regional nitrogen deposition, and climate change.

He has worked intensively in stream and river systems in southeastern Ohio, western North Carolina, northern and central Alabama, Maine, the North Slope of Alaska, the South Island of New Zealand, Panama and Iceland. His work has focused on a diverse set of stream types including intermittent headwater streams, arctic springs, geothermal springs, cave streams, tropical streams and river-floodplain complexes.

His research projects, although diverse, have been consistent in their focus on gaining understanding of processes controlling primary and secondary productivity. Within the past decade, he has become increasingly focused on answering questions about how food-web structure and landscape templates interact to control stream ecosystem productivity. Arctic streams have simple food webs that respond strongly to landscape variables. This makes them particularly amenable to studies of landscape control of productivity.

Huryn's presentation is sponsored by the ISU Department of Biological Sciences, which established the G.W. Minshall Lecture Series in Ecology to provide lasting recognition of the scientific contributions of Dr. Wayne Minshall, an ISU professor emeritus who has been an international leader in the study of streams and rivers.

For more information contact Ryan Blackadar at blacrya2@isu.edu.

Disability Services invites all to "Who Let the Dogs Out?!?!? Service and Therapy Dogs at ISU and in the Community," a workshop about service and therapy dogs March 21

Disability Services invites all to "Who Let the Dogs Out?!?!? Service and Therapy Dogs at ISU and in the Community," a workshop about service and therapy dogs March 21, 4-5 p.m. in Rendezvous 103.

Students and community members will talk about their experiences with therapy and service dogs, the process of getting one, the legal issues, and the do's and don'ts of caring for and being around these animals. If you have any questions call Disability Services 282-3599.

The College of Pharmacy has won first place in the national competition for Operation Diabetes from the American Pharmacists Association

The Idaho State University College of Pharmacy has won first place in the national competition for Operation Diabetes from the American Pharmacists Association (APhA).

Operation Diabetes is a student outreach program that involves screening the public for diabetes and offering education on management of the disease. A screening can involve a blood glucose test, blood pressure check, cholesterol check and individualized counseling. Student Pharmacists partner with other student health-care providers to offer collaborative patient care services. Participants are then given information or referred to a health care professional for further help.

"These services are offered for free and are paid for by the students through fundraising efforts and donations," said Paul Cady, Dean of the College of Pharmacy. "Students participate in health screenings throughout Southeast Idaho and the Treasure Valley. The services have been offered in English and Spanish."

The annual report of these efforts submitted to the APhA is judged for the competition. ISU has won the regional recognition many times, but this is the first time it has won first place in the national level competition.

Operation Diabetes is just one of the outreach projects that the College of Pharmacy students participate in. Other programs include Operation Heart, Operation Immunization, Heartburn Awareness, Meth Awareness and Poison Prevention. Through these efforts, students at the College of Pharmacy deliver direct patient care to 4,000 people every year and more than 120,000 people are reached annually through all of the College's community education efforts.

"Every blood pressure check, every blood glucose monitoring, every immunization makes a difference," Cady said. "It benefits the patient but also helps create a compassionate, well-educated pharmacist that is invested in patient health."

The Theatre and Dance department and Music department are teaming up to present the award-winning musical "Into the Woods" April 6, 7, 9, 12, 13 and 14

The Idaho State University theatre and dance department and music department are teaming up to present the award-winning musical "Into the Woods" at 7:30 p.m. April 6, 7, 9, 12, 13 and 14 inside the Beverly B. Bistline Theatre at the Stephens Performing Arts Center.

Stephen Sondheim's Tony Award-winning musical, "Into the Woods" intertwines the plots of several Grimm fairy tales but with an added twist.

The main characters come from "Little Red Riding Hood," "Jack and the Beanstalk," "Rapunzel," and "Cinderella." They are tied together by James Lapine's more original story involving a baker and his wife. The show covers multiple themes including growing up, relationships, accepting responsibility, morality, and wish fulfillment and its effects.

"The production, thus far, has been rewarding and challenging, at the same time," said Sherri Dienstfrey, director of the production. "I'm adoring the experience and I look forward to the finished product."

The cast is made up of 35 individuals. Chad Gross is the technical director; Tara Young is the costume designer, Brett Harwood is the set designer; Lauralee Zimmerly is the choreographer, Julie Sorensen is the orchestra conductor, and Kathleen Lane and Diana Livingston Friedley are the musical directors.

"The audience will most likely feel uncomfortable with the Wolf's tawdry 'Hello, Little Girl' in Act I; laugh with the Prince's 'Agony' number, as courting from the male perspective can be complicated; and empathize with the witch and her genuine concern for what we say to our children in her Act II 'Lament,'" Friedley said.

"Many of the songs repeat themes that either mutate or are used again in their original form," Friedley continued. "In my opinion, one of the most difficult numbers in the score is 'Your Fault.' Sondheim has musically depicted how mob-mentality can lead to frenetic discourse, in this case a short, repeated musical motive is brilliantly tossed from character to character."

Tickets are on sale now and available at the box office at the Stephens Performing Arts Center, or by calling 282-3595. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.isu.edu/tickets or at Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello and Idaho Falls. Prices are $15 for adults, $9 for pre-college students, $7 for ISU students with valid Bengal IDs, and $9 for group tickets of 10 or more people. For more information contact the Stephens Center Box Office at 282-3595.

Three ISU students have been selected from a nationwide pool of applicants to participate in a cyberinfrastructure program through the National Science Foundation's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

Three Idaho State University students have been selected from a nationwide pool of applicants to participate in a cyberinfrastructure program through the National Science Foundation's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).

Graduate students Peter Olsoy and Carlos Murillo and undergraduate Stephen Joy, majoring in geosciences, were chosen to participate in the program, which will give them hands-on experience with supercomputers, high-performance computing and other advanced data management and networking services, among other things.

"It's an attempt to try and bring cyberinfrastructure to be more recognized by all fields of science," said senior Stephen Joy. "We're trying to aid our university in getting up to par on cyberinfrastructure."

The students will receive online training through regularly scheduled web seminars, or "webinars," and receive financial support to travel to South Carolina's Clemson University where they can engage in projects with other program participants. They will also attend this year's International Supercomputing conference in November.

"I get to see how diverse the field is," said Joy of his experience with the program thus far. "It includes all kinds of disciplines.

"The program will be valuable to ISU because it can bring into light things that are currently lacking," he added. "This program shows us what is possible with supercomputing."

ISU will host the "Symposium on Indigenous Languages: Retention and Revitalization" April 10-12 in the Rendezvous Complex Suites A-C

Idaho State University will host the "Symposium on Indigenous Languages: Retention and Revitalization" April 10-12 in the Rendezvous Complex Suites A-C.

"We're very excited about hosting this symposium, exploring various issues and strategies for supporting indigenous languages," said Beverly Klug, ISU education professor and a symposium organizer. "We have experts from throughout the West coming to present at this event."

The symposium schedule includes the following presentations:

The symposium supported in part by a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council, a State-based Program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visit www.idahohumanities.org for more information on the Idaho Humanities Council.

Other sponsors include the ISU College of Education, ISU College of Arts and Letters and the ISU Cultural Affairs Council.

Additional members of the symposium committee are Christopher Loether, ISU anthropology professor; Drusilla Gould, Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Member and senior lecturer, ISU Department of Anthropology; and Sherice Gould, Language and Cultural Preservation Department Manager, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.