News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 12, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 10

Faculty/Staff Updates

ISU history professor Dr. Jack Owens was the speaker for the spring seminar of the Environmental Science and Resource Management Department of California State University Channel Islands in Camarillo

ISU history professor Dr. Jack Owens was the speaker for the spring seminar of the Environmental Science and Resource Management Department of California State University Channel Islands in Camarillo. He spoke Tuesday, March 13, on "Dynamics GIS and Geographically-Integrated History."

Owens was invited because of his expertise on the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for historical research and his role in the creation of ISU's GIS-based graduate program in Historical Resources Management.

Owens is the lead principal investigator for a $1.8 million, four-year grant from the National Science Foundation. The project's title is "Understanding social networks within complex, nonlinear systems: geographically-integrated history and dynamics GIS" [SOCNET]. He directs the project as a "virtual organization" from ISU-Meridian.

He earlier created a large, collaborative, multinational and interdisciplinary project for the European Science Foundation, based in Strasburg, France, entitled "Dynamic complexity of self-organizing cooperation-based commercial networks in the First Global Age" [DynCoopNet].

NSF provided Owens with a three-year, $400,000 grant to coordinate the DynCoopNet team of 19 researchers in 16 countries on five continents and to carry out his own research on cooperation in 16th and 17th century Spain.

More information on Owens and his research is available at http://idahostate.academia.edu/JBJackOwens.

News Bites

The Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) will visit Idaho State University in the fall of 2012

The Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) will visit Idaho State University in the fall of 2012. Shortly before this visit, ISU will submit its Year Three Self Evaluation report; this report updates and revises the institution's Year One Self Evaluation and goes on to address Standard Two-Resources and Capacity. The Accreditation Steering Committee and the Standard Two Subcommittees are in the process of drafting this self-evaluation. This effort is time consuming and is complicated by both the accelerated time frame of our first accreditation cycle and by the fact the State Board of Education just reviewed ISU's mission and core themes. The new NWCCU accreditation process is quite a departure from the previous one, as it is new to both the accredited institutions and to the evaluators from the NWCCU. Between now and April, several members of the Accreditation Steering Committee will receive training and or firsthand experience in the evaluation process.

Completion of the draft of ISU's Year Three Self Evaluation will likely occur after these activities.

The Steering Committee plans to publish the completed draft of the Year Two Self Study later this spring. The committee also plans to hold a campuswide forum on accreditation on March 22 at 3 p.m. The forum will be held in the PSUB theatre with offsite locations in Idaho Falls (CHE 208), Meridian (689), and Twin Falls(C89).

As the various working groups continue to draft their sections, your input is always welcome.

For more on the new accreditation process, visit: http://www.isu.edu/acadaff/accreditation.shtml.

A nationally recognized expert on child abuse and interpersonal violence, Wendy Murphy of New England Law-Boston, will be presenting March 20

A nationally recognized expert on child abuse and interpersonal violence, Wendy Murphy of New England Law-Boston, will be presenting March 20 in the Salmon River Suite, Pond Student Union. She has published numerous academic and pop culture articles, and provides legal analysis for CBS, CNN, ABC, Fox News, and NBC. She is an impact litigator, newspaper columnist and author of And Justice for Some (2007). Murphy began her career as a prosecutor in Middlesex County, handling child abuse and sex crime cases, and then moved into private practice, focusing on violence against women and children. She served as a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School and has been teaching a seminar on sexual violence as a member of the adjunct faculty at New England Law-Boston for more than ten years. Murphy runs two programs under the school's Center for Law and Social Responsibility including the Judicial Language Project, a first of its kind in program aimed at improving the language used in law and society to describe violence against women and children.

The ISU Society of Physics Students has received the 2011 Outstanding Chapter Award from the National Society of Physics Students and the American Physical Society

The Idaho State University Society of Physics Students (SPS) has received the 2011 Outstanding Chapter Award from the National Society of Physics Students and the American Physical Society. According to Dr. Steve Shropshire, the faculty advisor for the club, SPS Outstanding Chapters are determined each academic year after a careful review of the information, photos and supporting material presented in annual Chapter Reports. Criteria for the award includes: 1) Involvement in local, regional, and national SPS meetings, as well as other professional meetings, 2) Participation in SPS programs. 3) Outreach efforts to the grades K-12 or the general public, 4) Participation in community service, 5) Contributions to student recruitment and retention, 6) Participation in social events, and 7) Interactions with the department's alumni. ISU's club was specifically recognized for its Science Day presentation in the Pine Ridge Mall, a Punkn' Chuck competition they organized serving area schools, public demonstration shows, monthly "Something Destructive" events, outreach to public and private schools, and demonstration postings on Youtube.

Registration is now being accepted for ISU's Institute of Rural Health youth suicide prevention training Tuesday, May 15 in Meridian

Registration is now being accepted for Idaho State University's Institute of Rural Health youth suicide prevention training Tuesday, May 15, at the Joint School District No. 2 Service Center, Salmon River Room, 1303 E. Central Drive, in Meridian.

The training is free and open to the public, but seats are limited and you must pre-register. Go to www.isu.edu/irh/, contact Kirsti Beck at 208-282-4436 or email preventsuicide@isu.edu.

The training, which runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., is designed to provide the latest scientific information on the warning signs, risk and protective factors for suicide and mental illness, along with practical guidance on how to identify youth and young adults at risk for suicide. Information will assist professionals, community leaders, parents, advocates and all those who care for children and youth.

Continuing Education Credit is offered to social workers, nurses and licensed counselors who attend the entire six-hour training. Others who attend the entire training will receive certificates of completion.

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for Idaho youth aged 15-34. According to the American Association of Suicidology, Idaho's suicide rate ranked fourth in the nation in 2009.

The project is funded through the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act and administered by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration.

The ISU Department of Physics will host a regional Science Olympiad on Saturday, March 17

The Idaho State University Department of Physics will host a regional Science Olympiad on Saturday, March 17, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Physical Science Building on the corner of 8th Avenue and Carter Street on the ISU campus.

Seventh- through ninth-grade students from throughout eastern Idaho will represent their schools and communities and compete in teams in a variety of science competitions.

At least 16 teams from Eagle Rock Junior High, Irving Middle School, Franklin Middle School, Hawthorn Middle School, Sugar Salem Junior High School and White Pine Charter School will be competing.

Students will compete with mousetrap cars, rockets, and catapults. They'll also compete in an experimental design challenge, test their knowledge of thermal energy and rocks and minerals, and compete in several other fun science events.

Winning teams will be encouraged to compete in the state competition in Nampa on April 14. The Idaho champion team will be invited to compete in the National Science Olympiad at Indiana University in May.

The Science Olympiad is a national non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of science education, increasing student interest in science, and providing recognition for outstanding achievement by both students and teachers.

Steve Shropshire, a professor in the ISU Department of Physics, and ISU students from the departments of mechanical engineering, geosciences, and physics will serve as judges, along with several scientists and engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory.

More information on the Science Olympiad program is available at www.soinc.org.

For more information on the ISU Science Olympiad, contact Shropshire at shropshi@physics.isu.edu or 282-2212.

Professor Susan Swetnam of ISU's English Department will discuss Girl Scouting in Southern Idaho Friday, March 16

Professor Susan Swetnam of ISU's English Department will discuss Girl Scouting in Southern Idaho Friday, March 16 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Liberal Arts 243.

Though the term "Girl Scout" is sometimes used in popular culture to suggest a bland do-gooder who follows the status-quo, the history of Girl Scouting nationally and in Southern Idaho confirms that the movement has always been driven by a subversive, even feminist ethos that encourages girls to think for themselves and break conventional molds of helplessness and passivity. This presentation profiles the early national movement and the roots of Girl Scouting in Southern Idaho (especially Southeastern Idaho and Pocatello), describing the unconventional, independent-thinking women who shaped Scouting and the activities they introduced to encourage girls to explore a broad range of abilities and interests, gaining confidence and courage along the way.

ISU Undergraduate and Graduate Research Symposiums are set for April 4 and 5

Idaho State University Undergraduate and Graduate Research Symposiums are set for April 4 and 5.

The Undergraduate Student Research Symposium is set for April 4, 3-5:30 p.m. in the Wood River Room of the Pond Student Union. Light refreshments will be served.

The Graduate Research and Creative Excellence Symposium is set for April 5, 3-5:30 p.m. in the Wood River Room of the Pond Student Union. Light refreshments will be served.

ISU's Pocatello Family Medicine is open to new patients

Idaho State University's Pocatello Family Medicine is open to new patients.

Conveniently located on campus at 465 Memorial Drive across from Holt Arena, the full-service clinic provides care across the generations: from pregnancy and childhood to adulthood and the elderly. With extended hours coming soon, same-day appointments, and urgent care make the clinic handy for ISU employees. Visits are performed by academic family physicians, medical residents, and other providers. Pocatello Family Medicine offers innovative, interdisciplinary,holistic care options associated with our Baby Boomer Medical Home project including exercise classes, nutrition consultation, mental health counseling, and medication education. Make an appointment today by calling 282-4700 or stopping by 465 Memorial Drive.

The new edition of the Office of Research Newsletter is available

The a new edition of the Office of Research Newsletter is available at http://www.isu.edu/research/Newsv1i3.shtml.