News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

March 5, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 9

Faculty/Staff Updates

Jeff Meldrum recently launched an online journal entitled The Relict Hominoid Inquiry

Jeff Meldrum, associate professor of anatomy and anthropology at Idaho State University, recently launched an online journal entitled The Relict Hominoid Inquiry.

The journal features refereed articles and discussions on the topic of human evolution, focusing on the "possible existence and nature of relict hominoid species," or unrecognized apes and human ancestors that may still be extant.

An editorial board of currently 11 members assists Meldrum, as editor-in-chief, in coordinating external peer-review and discussion of papers to be featured in the journal. This board also includes George Schaller, a preeminent field biologist, well-known for his early research on mountain gorillas.

"Having someone of Schaller's stature in natural history and conservation lend his endorsement to the goals of this journal is a very positive and notable development," said Meldrum.

According to Meldrum, the idea for the journal had been in the works for "quite a period of time" before making its recent debut.

"As it happens, 2012 also marks the 30th anniversary of the organization of the journal Cryptozoology (now defunct), which was the only other scholarly journal in this area of scientific investigation," Meldrum said.

"There's a need for a scholarly venue that will promote the publication and discussion of research and exploration into the question of relict hominoids, a subject often rejected out of hand by mainstream science journals," he added.

The inaugural editorial, written by Meldrum, discusses the hominoid family tree.

"One of the themes of the journal emphasizes that there is a growing recognition of the ever-increasing bushiness of the hominoid family tree," he said. "The human species has not been solitary in the past; why would the present be an exception? Why would we be the last hominid standing?"

Well-known for his interest and research on the topic of the sasquatch, Meldrum said that the journal will be dedicated to articles regarding the existence of such creatures worldwide.

"As the journal's logo suggests, this is a global phenomenon," he said, mentioning the Himalayan yeti, the Chinese yeren, and the Russian almasty, and explaining that these creatures are each different potential relict species.

A study by Melba Ketchum, of DNA Diagnostics, establishing the DNA sequence of the sasquatch is currently in review. Depending on the outcome of the study, "The Relict Hominoid Inquiry" could see vastly increased popularity and mainstream exposure, according to Meldrum.

Meldrum was recently interviewed by a reporter for the British publication "New Scientist Magazine" for an issue regarding human evolution. He said the interview focused on the growing scientific interest in the possibility of relict hominoids and was an opportunity to showcase the launch of the journal.

The journal is all-online and free to access. It can be found at www.isu.edu/rhi.

Phil Homan's research on Kittie Wilkins, the Idaho Horse Queen, is being featured by the National Endowment for the Humanities

Associate professor Phil Homan's research on Kittie Wilkins, the Idaho Horse Queen, is being featured by the National Endowment for the Humanities in the upcoming issue of Humanities magazine.

News Bites

The Hispanic Awareness Leadership Organization (H.A.L.O.) will host "A Night in Mexico" at 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, in the Pond Student Union Ballroom

The Idaho State University Hispanic Awareness Leadership Organization (H.A.L.O.) will host "A Night in Mexico" at 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, in the Pond Student Union Ballroom.

Come enjoy a night of authentic Mexican food and live entertainment.

The dinner menu includes carnitas, tamales, tostadas, rice, beans, other entrees and desserts. Entertainment includes Aztec and folkloric dancing, singing and a fashion show.

Ticket pricing for the event is $7 for ISU students with a Bengal I.D., $8 for faculty and staff, and $9 for the public. Ticket sales are taking place in the Pond Student Union and Rendezvous Complex from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. Tickets purchased at the door will cost an additional $1.

For more information contact Francisco Martinez, martfra2@isu.edu.

The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy is looking for eight to 12 volunteers to participate in a study examining the "Occupational Role Change in Stroke Survivors"

The Idaho State University Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy is looking for eight to 12 volunteers to participate in a study examining the "Occupational Role Change in Stroke Survivors."

"We're really looking at how a stroke changes a person's life," said Ted Peterson, ISU occupational therapy clinical assistant professor and the study's principal investigator, "and changes the roles in their lives, things like being a grandmother or spouse, whatever role people define for themselves. These roles often change dramatically after they have a stroke and that's what we're trying to zero in on."

Study volunteers must meet the following inclusion criteria:

There is no cost to participate, and there is no compensation for participation.

Volunteers will be interviewed in their homes or, at their request, at a public place convenient to them. They will be asked to complete a survey, "The Role Checklist," regarding their occupational roles, after which they will be asked questions regarding their responses and their perceptions of life satisfaction before and after the stroke. It is anticipated that participation will take 60 to 90 minutes.

One way in which people organize their lives is through occupational roles, according to Peterson. Occupational roles help to define both societal and personal expectations regarding an individual's activities. Examples of occupational roles include breadwinner, homemaker, parent/grandparent, volunteer and other such meaningful roles as defined for oneself by an individual.

"The fulfillment of occupational roles contributes significantly to the way a person finds meaning in life and is a significant determinant of the level of life satisfaction experienced," Peterson said.

Major illnesses and injuries have the potential to change the way in which a person is able to fulfill his or her occupational roles. In the case where physical or cognitive disability persists, there may need to be a change in the occupational roles an individual attempts to fulfill. Since occupational roles are intimately connected with a person's self-concept, such changes have the potential to significantly alter the meaningfulness and the amount of satisfaction one derives from his or her life.

"The purpose of the study is to investigate the phenomenon of occupational role change in stroke survivors," Peterson said. "This may include such topics as the prevalence and/or magnitude of such change, its correlation with how survivors perceive the quality of their lives, and personal experience with such change."

Research assistants will include students in the ISU Master of Occupational Therapy program who will use their participation to fulfill research class requirements for graduation.

For more information or to volunteer for the study, contact Peterson at (208) 282-4631 or petetheo@isu.edu.

Uninsured and in need of medical or dental care?

Uninsured and in need of medical or dental care?

Attend a free Community Health Screening, Thursday, March 15, 4 to 7 p.m., at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise. Faculty and student clinicians from the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center will conduct the screenings.

Services include:

Since March 2010, ISU-Meridian, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare have partnered to offer the screenings to low-income or uninsured Ada County adults.

The goal is to provide health education information and identify potential health problems before uninsured patients become so ill they are forced to seek treatment at hospital emergency rooms, increasing the financial burden on taxpayers.

"Through the screenings, we have identified individuals who were in need of immediate care, possibly saving their lives. Many others have had chronic medical conditions that were not an emergency, but if left untreated had the potential of becoming a more serious and costly health crisis," said Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman.

"Prevention is a crucial piece of health care, and our mission with these screening events is to identify individuals at risk of preventable diseases and get them connected with providers in the area, all the while providing our students valuable clinical experience," said Dr. Glenda Carr, an ISU-Meridian assistant clinical pharmacy professor.

The full screening process takes about an hour. No appointment is necessary. For more information, call 373-1700.

The Idaho Museum of Natural History will host a series of lectures titled "There and Back Again: An Anthropologist's Tale" by ISU's premier anthropologists beginning March 21

The Idaho State University Idaho Museum of Natural History will host a series of lectures titled "There and Back Again: An Anthropologist's Tale" by ISU's premier anthropologists beginning March 21.

Join the anthropologists as they describe their ongoing research into human behavior and history in some of the most exotic locales on Earth. Travel "There and Back Again" to Ecuador, Rapa Nui, Chechnya and Burma as you learn about people in different places and at different times.

All lectures are free and open to the public and will be held in the Museum Classroom 204 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Below is the complete schedule:

For more information contact Rebecca Thorne-Ferrel at 282-2195 or thorrebe@isu.edu.

On March 10 Idaho State University will play host to a children's entertainer extraordinaire, Shana Banana

On March 10 Idaho State University will play host to a children's entertainer extraordinaire, Shana Banana.

This family event will be held in ISU's Pond Student Union Building, on the third floor, in the Salmon River Suites. The event starts at 3 p.m. that Saturday and will run until 5 p.m.

Shana Banana has been a quality children's entertainer for over a decade and has made appearances at ISU in the past. She has also worked on her own television series for PBS called "Banana Bread," has released several CDs (Banana Bedtime, Kidding Around Yoga, Music and Fun for Kids, Song in my Pocket), and a yoga for kids DVD.

Admission is free for ISU Students with valid Bengal ID's, $3 for general public, and $10 per family.

For more information about this event please visit www.isu.edu/sab, call the Involvement Center at 208-282-3451, email questions to sab@isu.edu, or visit Shana Banana's website at http://www.shanabanana.com.

On Thursday, March 15, ISU will welcome comedians Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele

On Thursday, March 15, Idaho State University is in for a real laugh at 7 p.m. in the Pond Student Union Ballroom when ISU welcomes comedians Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele, who have recently started airing their own sketch show on Comedy Central titled "Key & Peele."

In their television series, and at ISU, the actors will have you laughing in your seats "through a combination of filmed sketches and live stage segments. Whether it's satirizing the President, spoofing Nazis, or ordering up some soul food, 'Key & Peele' showcases their chemistry, camaraderie and unique point of view, born from their shared background and experiences growing up biracial in a not quite post-racial world."

Admission is free for ISU Students with valid Bengal ID's, and $5 for the general public, faculty, and staff. Tickets in advance will NOT be sold. Admission is at the door only. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

For more information about this event, please visit www.isu.edu/sab, call the Involvement Center at 208-282-3451, or email questions to sab@isu.edu. Also, feel free to check out Key & Peele's show at www.comedycentral.com.

The Veterans Sanctuary and Armed Forces Veterans' Club will be selling raffle tickets at Chrome in the Dome for a chance to win a lubester

The Idaho State University Veterans Sanctuary and Armed Forces Veterans' Club will be selling raffle tickets at Chrome in the Dome for a chance to win a lubester, which is an early 20th-century oil dispenser that is hot among classic car enthusiasts and collectors.

Chrome in the Dome is March 16 from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. and March 17 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Holt Arena. The drawing to win the lubester will be at 6 p.m. on March 17 at the Holt Arena. Those who purchase raffle tickets do not have to be present at the drawing to win.

The lubester was donated by local veteran and ISU staff member, Jim Turmes, and restored by the College of Technology's Auto Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology Program. Raffle tickets will be sold for $1 each, or six for $5. The proceeds will benefit ISU student veterans and the Veterans Sanctuary.

The Armed Forces Veterans' Club will sell tickets in the ISU Pond Student Union foyer on March 7 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and in the Rendezvous Complex Atrium on March 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A table will also be setup at Chrome in the Dome on March 16 from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m., and March 17 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tickets can also be purchased at the ISU Veterans Sanctuary on the third floor of the Pond Student Union Building.

If you are interested in purchasing tickets, or would like more information, contact Tomarra Byington or Casey Santee at (208) 282-4245.

For more information on Chrome in the Dome, please contact Russell Butler at (208) 282-3305.