News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

February 13, 2012 — Vol. 28 No. 6

Faculty/Staff Updates

Congratulations to Randy Jones, University Storekeeper in Finance and Administration's Purchasing Department

Congratulations to Randy Jones, University Storekeeper in Finance and Administration's Purchasing Department. He was the lucky winner in the Fall ISU Cares drawing for $100. He was given the award in a surprise meeting attended by several of his coworkers and a supervisor from Purchasing. Randy was awarded a certificate of appreciation, posters recognizing his efforts, and a $100 check to thank him for his great customer service on behalf of Idaho State University and Purchasing. To learn more about Randy, click ISU Cares.

All ISU employees who were nominated through an ISU Cares survey during the fall, September through December, with either an online or paper survey, were entered into the semester drawing. To nominate an ISU employee for their service, click survey. To learn more about the ISU Cares program and our past or current winners, click ISU Cares.

Please join us to celebrate the retirement of David Sorensen, Ph.D., Speech Pathologist, from the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department

Please join us to celebrate the retirement of David Sorensen, Ph.D., Speech Pathologist, from the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department. The reception is Feb.23, 4 -6 p.m. at the Bennion Promenade in the Stephens Performing Arts Center. After 27 years of service at ISU as professor, department chair, the chair of Human Subjects Committee, assistant dean, and other contributions, we hope you will join us to wish him well.

Electrical engineering Professor and Department Chair Hossein Mousavinezhad met with Idaho Governor C. L. "Butch" Otter to discuss the issue of attracting more students into University-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines

Idaho State University electrical engineering Professor and Department Chair Hossein Mousavinezhad met with Idaho Governor C. L. "Butch" Otter in Boise on Feb. 8 to discuss the issue of attracting more students into University-level science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

According to a report by the U.S. News and World Report, there will be 8 million jobs in these fields by the year 2018 and some major industrial companies like Boeing have reported similar figures.

ISU's College of Science and Engineering is in a unique position to attract more students to these high-demand disciplines, Mousavinezhad said. The College of Science and Engineering can work with Colleges of Technology and Education to offer programs to train more K-12 teachers to guarantee the United States is educating the workforce of the future in this information technology and knowledge-based economy.

Mousavinezhad reported to the governor that he recently returned from an Office of Naval Research/National Science Foundation workshop in Napa, Calif., where electrical engineering department chairs and faculty members gathered to discuss programs in the electric power/energy areas. They also listened to speakers from National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Electrical Power Research Institute and other organizations with concerns that many engineers in these fields will be reaching retirement age. It will be difficult to replace these workers unless states, industry and federal government work together to sustain a steady growth in the number of graduates.

As reported earlier, Mousavinezhad said there are scholarships available for students majoring in electrical engineering who will be interested in pursuing careers in power industry and do engineering design and innovation work in SmartGrid, electric transportation and related areas. ISU electrical engineering student Chris Larson was a winner of such a scholarship program.

Gov. Otter expressed interest in these reports and has invited Mousavinezhad to join him and other speakers in an upcoming STEM Summit in Boise, according to Mousavinezhad.

News Bites

The Student Success Center will offer a series of presentations during the month of March to promote peer involvement on campus beginning March 1

The Idaho State University Student Success Center will offer a series of presentations during the month of March to promote peer involvement on campus beginning March 1.

"March Toward Student Success: Peer Into Your Future" will provide information on how to get involved in peer advising, peer tutoring, peer First Year Seminar instruction and peer mentoring.

These interactive presentations will include panels of students currently serving as peers and information on how to apply for academic peer leadership opportunities. Please contact Central Academic Advising with any questions at 282-3277 or advinfo@isu.edu.

The full "Peer Into Your Future" schedule is below:

The Anderson Gender Resource Center will host poet and doula V. Wetlaufer March 7 as part of this ninth annual Art of Gender in Everyday Life Conference

The Idaho State University Anderson Gender Resource Center will host poet and doula V. Wetlaufer March 7 as part of this ninth annual Art of Gender in Everyday Life Conference.

Wetlaufer will give a reading Wednesday at 7 p.m. March 7 in the Pond Student Union Salmon River Suite on the ISU campus. The event will be followed by a workshop and poster session the following day, Thursday March 8, from 10 a.m. to noon, also in the Salmon River Suite. Both events are free and open to the public.

Wetlaufer, from Salt Lake City, is a doctoral fellow in English and creative writing at the University of Utah. She is the poetry editor for Quarterly West. Her poems have appeared in Drunken Boat, Main Street Rag, PANK Magazine,Word Riot and Bloom. Her chapbook "Scent of Shatter" was published in early 2010 by Grey Book Press.

She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing from Florida State University and a Master of Arts degree in teaching from Bennington College in Vermont. Her manuscript "Call Me By My Other Name" was a finalist for the The Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize in Poetry. She has read her work in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Tallahassee, Fla., New York City and Washington, D.C. Her current work focuses on hybridity and the idea of queering gender and queering genre.

For the workshop, Wetlaufer has offered to review and provide constructive feedback to participants' samples of creative writing if submitted by Feb. 15. This is a unique opportunity for anybody who would like to have their work critiqued in order to improve as a writer. Writing samples should be sent to burlasa@isu.edu.

The ISU Art of Gender in Everyday Life Conference focuses on how ideas and stereotypes concerning gender and gender roles shape and influence various aspects of our daily lives. The three-day conference hosts speakers, poster sessions, workshops, the ever popular short film festival LUNAFEST and much more. All events are free and open to the ISU community as well as the general public.

This year the conference will present a combination of local faculty and student presenters as well as guests from all over the country, including the keynote speaker Stephanie Coontz who will deliver a talk titled "The Unadulterated History of Marriage."

For more information about this or other conference events, contact the Anderson Center at 282-2805 or visit www.isu.edu/andersoncenter for a full conference schedule.

ISU - Meridian is partnering with several agencies to provide free health screenings Feb. 16 in Boise

Uninsured and unable to afford medical care?

Treasure Valley residents can attend a free Community Health Screening, Thursday, Feb. 16, 4-7 p.m., in the Western Town Building at the Expo Idaho Fairgrounds, 5610 N. Glenwood St., in Boise.

The Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare have partnered to bring free community health screenings to low-income Ada County adults.

ISU clinical faculty and students conduct the screenings, which include free flu shots, basic physical exams, dental evaluations, hearing and depression screenings, on-site testing for blood sugar levels and HIV, mammogram referrals and a variety of health education information.

The screenings, which sprang from an Ada County initiative to find ways to help save taxpayer dollars spent on indigent health care costs, began in March 2010. Since then, 312 people have been screened, according to organizers.

"Prevention is a crucial piece of health care, and our mission with these screening events is to identify individuals at risk of preventable diseases and get them connected with providers in the area. All the while providing our students valuable clinical experience," said Dr. Glenda Carr, an ISU-Meridian assistant clinical pharmacy professor.

Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman notes that state-mandated payments for health care for low-income and uninsured adults can be an expensive burden on taxpayers - especially if the patient seeks treatment in a hospital emergency room.

"Through the screenings, we have identified individuals who were in need of immediate care, possibly saving their lives. Many others have had chronic medical conditions that were not an emergency, but if left untreated had the potential of becoming a more serious and costly health crisis," said Ullman.

The free screenings are intended for low-income adults with no insurance or limited access to preventative health care. The full screening process takes about an hour. No appointment is necessary. For more information, call 373-1700.

The 19th annual Professional Pharmacy Student Alliance Spaghetti Feed, Raffle and Auction is Friday, Feb. 24

The 19th annual Idaho State University Professional Pharmacy Student Alliance (PPSA) Spaghetti Feed, Raffle and Auction will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, in the Pond Student Union Ballroom.

"The students are continuing their record success and they want you to be a part of it," said Julie Hillebrant, ISU College of Pharmacy assistant to the dean.

The PPSA Spaghetti Feed, Raffle and Auction is an annual fundraiser put on by students to help raise the necessary money to fund their rural community patient outreach projects for which they have received national recognition.

Recognizing the importance of community stewardship, the pharmacy students donate at least 25 percent of the proceeds from the Spaghetti Feed Auction to a Make-A-Wish child and have traditionally fully funded wish recipients in past years.

This year, the Make-A-Wish child is Savanah, a 7-year-old girl from Pocatello, who was diagnosed with a congenital heart defect. Her wish is to experience the magic of Disney World with her family.

"Your donations will go a long way to help support pharmacy students in the local community and fulfill the wish of a local child," Hillebrant said.

The event is meant for the whole family with activities for the children and many raffle items including a stereo surround system, a Tissot Watch and an Apple iPad.

Tickets for the dinner are $5 per person or $20 per family. Tickets can be purchased in advance by contacting the College of Pharmacy at 282-4597.

The Division of Health Science will host the "2012 Research Day: Crossing the Boundaries Through the Disciplines" March 16

Idaho State University Division of Health Science will host the "2012 Research Day: Crossing the Boundaries Through the Disciplines" in the Pond Student Union Building on March 16 from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Keynote presentations will be broadcast from ISU-Meridian to the Pocatello campus. Presentations will begin at 8:45 a.m. with Judy Thorne and Margaret Doucette presenting "Idaho to Uganda: Crossing Boundaries to Public Health" in the North Fork and Middle Fork Rooms inside the Pond Student Union.

Following the keynote presentations will be poster presentations showcasing ISU student and faculty research at 10:30 a.m. in the Ballroom.

For more information contact Tara Johnson at johntara@isu.edu.

The Union Program Council will present a fun-filled evening of family entertainment with The Society Improv Comedy Troupe March 16

The Idaho State University Union Program Council will present a fun-filled evening of family entertainment with The Society Improv Comedy Troupe at 7 p.m. March 16 at the Jensen Grand Concert Hall in the Stephens Performing Arts Center.

The show will highlight the comedic talent of Kirby Heyborne, from The Singles Ward, and three others. The show consists of improv music and comedy similar to what appeared on the television program "Whose Line Is It Anyway?"

Tickets are available on Feb. 9 for ISU students and on Feb. 21 for the public. Ticket prices begin at $7 for students and $12 for public.

Tickets are available at the Pond Student Union Campus Connection, the Stephens Center Box Office, www.isu.edu/tickets, over the phone by calling 208-282-3595 and at Vickers Western Stores in Idaho Falls and Pocatello. For more information on tickets, visit www.isu.edu/union/upc.

For more information, contact the Union Program Council at upc@isu.edu.

For more information about the The Society Improv Comedy Troupe visit http://www.jointhesociety.com.

Free income tax return preparation for low income taxpayers will be offered by VITA, a volunteer arm of the Internal Revenue Service, every Thursday through March 15

Free income tax return preparation for low income taxpayers will be offered by VITA, a volunteer arm of the Internal Revenue Service, every Thursday through March 15 from 5 to 9 p.m. in Room 111 of Idaho State University's Turner Hall.

Members of Beta Alpha Psi, ISU's accounting fraternity, will provide these services on a first-come, first-served basis on Feb. 9, Feb. 16, Feb. 23, March 1, March 8 and March 15.

Taxpayers will need to bring valid identification such as state-issued drivers license or ID card and their own Social Security cards, as well as the cards of anyone else listed on the return. Documents such as W-2s, Forms 1099, and Form 1098-T will also be required as well as any other relevant documents. If taxpayers prefer to have their refund direct deposited, they will also need to bring a voided check.

No appointment is necessary. For more information contact Pete Frischmann at 282-3501 or email Beta Alpha Psi's Brett Horsburgh at horsbret@isu.edu.

The Idaho Museum of Natural History is teaming with Alaskan "fin artist" Ray Troll to collect more information about a prehistoric predator

The Idaho State University Idaho Museum of Natural History is teaming with Alaskan "fin artist" Ray Troll to form a "Helicoprion shark posse" to collect more information about this prehistoric predator that had a "spiral saw" lower jaw that had the appearance of a circular saw blade.

"Come join our shark posse," Troll said. "Please bring forth your whorls of fossilized teeth."

The Museum and artist are asking for help from private collectors who may have individual or collections of fossilized "coils of wickedly sharp, serrated teeth."

"We know there are some great private Helicoprion collections out there," said Leif Tapanila, IMNH curator and ISU associate professor of geosciences. "To complete our studies we'd like to have information from as many samples as possible."

He encourages private fossil owners to send photographs of their samples that include a ruler in the picture so the scientists can determine the size of the fossil. Tapanila stressed that the museum is not interested in collecting the samples from private owners, although the museum certainly wouldn't turn down any gifts or the opportunity to study borrowed fossils.

Troll, whose popular artistic works include the paintings "Spawn Till You Die" and "Is Fish Worship Wrong," and the IMNH's Tapanila and undergraduate student Jesse Pruitt share a fascination with Helicoprion sharks that swam the oceans 280 to 220 million years ago.

The IMNH has the largest known North American public collection of Helicoprion jaw fossils, with 27 fossils of complete or near complete jaws, according to Tapanila. The IMNH and Troll are in the initial stages of creating a new Helicoprion shark exhibit, which should be completed in about 18 months.

Troll, a well-regarded scientific illustrator as well as a fine arts artist, has volunteered to complete drawings for the exhibit and visited the IMNH earlier this month. In return, Troll, who has had an "obsession" with spiral-saw sharks for 30 years, is being granted access to the IMNH collection and new research findings.

The IMNH is in the midst of completing new studies on the Helicoprion, including creating a computerized 3-D virtual replica of a Helicoprion jaw and trying to determine how many species of Helicoprion actually existed.

Both parties want more samples.

"I want to be able to draw a Helicoprion as accurately as I can, using the best possible scientific information," Troll said. "Science helps us dial in and see how it actually was."

The shark had the circular jaw on the bottom and flat plates on the roof of its mouth that when used together were good for tearing and to "crimp and rip." It was widespread and plenty of its fossils have been found throughout the world, including in Idaho, Nevada, California, Mexico, Arctic Canada, Russia, China, Japan and Australia. Many of the Idaho Museum of Natural History Helicoprion fossils are in good shape and primarily come from phosphate and other mines.

Idaho Museum of Natural History Director Herb Maschner said he was excited about the IMNH's collaboration with Troll on its Helicoprion work.

"Ray Troll is one of the premier people in the world for translating science into art, especially marine science," Maschner said. "He takes complex topics like the health of oceans or fisheries and translates it into art in such a meaningful way to anyone who sees it. The guy is world renowned and I couldn't be happier that we're planning an exhibit together."

To contact the Idaho Museum Natural History regarding privately held Helicoprion fossils, contact Tapanila at tapaleif@isu.edu or 208-282-3871.

For more information about the Museum, visit http://imnh.isu.edu/.

For more information on Troll and his art, visit http://www.trollart.com/.

A Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition titled "Pestilence" will open Tuesday, Feb. 21, in the ISU John B. Davis Gallery in the Fine Arts Building

An Idaho State University Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition titled "Pestilence" will open Tuesday, Feb. 21, in the ISU John B. Davis Gallery in the Fine Arts Building.

The exhibition will close Friday, March 2, and a closing reception will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. The reception is free and open for public attendance. Memphis, Tenn., native Joanna Cleveland is the artist behind the works.

Cleveland received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from Kentucky's Murray State University. She enjoys hiking and exploring the diverse landscapes of Idaho, as Pocatello has been her first introduction to the environment of the Pacific Northwest.

The artist uses a combination of paint, fabric and sculptural installations to explore connections between scientific research and disease as an individual experience. Her work is a visual reference to the human body's internal structure and the relationships between growth and decay, beauty and disgust, and science and personal experience.

The Davis Gallery Hours are Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except it is closed on some holidays. For more information, visit www.isu.edu/art/galleries.shtml or call Amy Jo Popa, gallery director, at 208-282-3341.

Photos of "Brush With Greatness," Idaho State University and Delta Dental of Idaho's special evening at the Boise Steelheads hockey game

Photos of "Brush With Greatness," Idaho State University and Delta Dental of Idaho's special evening at the Boise Steelheads hockey game are available on the ISU website at http://www.isu.edu/brush/. Thank you to all who attended the event.