News and Notes

A Newsletter for Faculty and Staff of Idaho State University

September 26, 2011 — Vol. 27 No. 38

News Bites

The College of Technology will host its annual open house Thursday, Sept. 29

Are you thinking about a new career but don't know where to start? The Idaho State University College of Technology will host its annual open house from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, in the ISU Roy F. Christensen Building, located at 777 Memorial Drive in Pocatello.

The College will showcase programs that can lead to employment in some of the fastest growing, high-demand careers in Idaho and the nation.

Experience the ISU College of Technology up close. Participants may tour labs, meet with instructors and get their questions answered. The College of Technology offers more than 40 programs leading to one-year certificates all the way to associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees.

Open house participants can discover how to build unlimited career opportunities for you or a family member by taking part in the open house. The open house will show prospective students what it takes to pursue options in energy-systems engineering technology, business and service oriented programs, health occupations, trades and technical fields. Following the open house everyone is invited to meet administrators and enjoy refreshments prepared by the College of Technology culinary arts students.

For more information about the event contact Debbie Ronneburg at 208-282-2622 in the ISU College of Technology.

The Theatre/Dance Department will open its 2011-2012 production season with "Dr. Faustus" at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, 8, 13, 14 and 15 in the Bilyeu Theatre in Frazier Hall

The Idaho State University School of Performing Arts Theatre/Dance Department will open its 2011-2012 production season with the chilling, and often controversial, dramatic tale of "Dr. Faustus" at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, 8, 13, 14 and 15 in the Bilyeu Theatre in Frazier Hall.

Written by Christopher Marlowe, "Dr. Faustus" stands securely as one of the great classics of the ages. Faustus sells his eternal soul to the devil in order to acquire the skills of black magic and to know more than any human being. After 24 years his bargain is up and Faustus is damned to hell for all eternity.

With good angels and bad angels, the devil, and a host of other diverse characters, "Dr. Faustus," although dark in nature, is surprisingly funny and suspenseful. The play features a huge cast of more than 20 characters. Some characters have more than three costumes each, featuring the original costume design by ISU Associate Professor Tara Young.

With "Hell" emerging from the pit space commonly used for the orchestra, scene designer Brett Harwood and technical director Chad Gross have attempted to transform the Bilyeu Theatre into a remarkable scenic masterpiece. Sound, lighting, and special effects round out this thrilling opening production.

Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $9 for children ages 6-18 and $7 for ISU students with Bengal cards. Tickets may be purchased at the Stephens Performing Arts Center Box Office 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, by phone at 208-282-3595 or online at www.isu.edu/tickets. Tickets may also be purchased at Vickers Western Stores in Pocatello and Idaho Falls.

All are invited to the Idaho Working Women's Business Symposium

All are invited to the Idaho Working Women's Business Symposium. Develop a hot personal brand and learn from the experiences of successful businesswomen.

This year's symposium will be held at the Pocatello Clarion Inn on Thursday Oct. 6 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 and include a full day of training with regional and national business experts, fun working lunch, business expo, networking opportunities, tote gift bag, and a chance to win fun prizes including an Apple iPad! Registration is at www.idahoworkingwomen.com.

The Working Women's Symposium features keynote speakers, Sylvia Medina, President of North Wind Inc. and Liz Goodgold, CEO of Red Fire Branding. Additional topics include retirement planning for women, balancing work and home, using social media in your business, grants for women, health topics, improving your credit score, how to collect unpaid contracts, fashionable customer service, and working from home.

Businesses are invited to register for a trade table as well to promote your company to attendees. Tables are $75 and include one ticket to the Symposium. All registration is online. Go to www.idahoworkingwomen.com and register today. Tickets are limited. Call (208) 244-8521 for questions or additional information.

This event is sponsored by the Small Business Development Center, under the ISU College of Business and Rockwood Stone Wealth Management LLC.

The Athletic Department is giving fans the opportunity to see the Bengal football team play at Weber State and Montana State on Oct. 15 and Oct. 29

The Idaho State Athletic Department is giving fans the opportunity to see the Bengal football team play at Weber State and Montana State on Oct. 15th and Oct. 29th. Reservations will cost fans $50 for the Weber State game and $80 for Montana State.

Prices include a game ticket, lunch, and transportation. If interested, reserve your seat by Oct. 5th for Weber State and Oct. 19th for Montana State. Fans can reserve their seat on the Bengal bus by contacting the Bengal Athletic Boosters by phone at (208) 282-2397 and by email at ytuatris@isu.edu.

For the second year, the ISU-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare have partnered to bring free community health screenings to low-income Ada County residents

Uninsured and unable to afford medical care?

For the second year, the Idaho State University-Meridian Health Science Center, Ada County, Central District Health, and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare have partnered to bring free community health screenings to low-income Ada County residents.

Faculty and students from the Meridian Health Science Center will conduct the screenings Wednesday, Sept. 28, 4-7 p.m., at Redeemer Lutheran Church, 2920 Cassia St., in Boise.

The program, which sprang from an Ada County initiative to find ways to help save taxpayer dollars spent on indigent health care costs, provides free hepatitis vaccines, basic physical exams, dental evaluations, hearing and depression screenings, on-site testing for blood sugar levels and HIV, and a variety of health education information.

"Helping low income individuals proactively get health care screenings, and take responsibility for their own health, are critical steps in preventing conditions from getting to the point of requiring an ER visit or worse," said Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman. "This effort will in turn mean savings to County taxpayers on indigent health care costs."

The free screenings are intended for low-income adults with no insurance or limited access to preventive health care. The full screening process will take about an hour. In addition to conducting the screenings, ISU-Meridian faculty and students will provide disease prevention, dental, nutritional and diabetes education.

For more information, call 373-1700.

Want to watch your favorite former women's basketball players go head to head on the court?

Want to watch your favorite former women's basketball players go head to head on the court? Well now you can! The Idaho State women's basketball team is hosting an alumni game between former Bengals athletes on Saturday, Oct. 1 at Reed Gym. Tip-off begins at 11 a.m.

"There are so many great players that have come through Idaho State. It will be fun to have them come back and play," said Head Coach Seton Sobolewski. "Our loyal fans will enjoy seeing them again."

Former players who are returning to Idaho State to compete in the alumni game include: Angela Munger, Holly Togiai, Natalie Doma, Michelle Grohs, Oana Iacovita, Devin Diehl, Andrea Videbeck, Aralee Smith, Merrilee Udy, Alison Verona, Jen Cannon, Loraine Skow, Stacy Nelson, Merinda Halladay, Justine Richmond, Camile Michaelson.

It is the first year the Bengals have put on an alumni game and they are excited about watching former players compete again at Reed Gym.

"It's something that we hope to build in the years to come," said Sobolewski. "ISU women's basketball has a rich tradition that we want our current players to know about."

Any other women's basketball alumni who are interested in playing should contact Seton Sobolewski 208-282-3381.

Prospective student referrals are one of the greatest gifts you can make to Idaho State University

Prospective student referrals are one of the greatest gifts you can make to Idaho State University. Recruitment Services is currently asking the campus community to provide us the names of high school students you would like us to reach out to and actively recruit. Specifically, we are seeking the names and contact information of students who you feel will thrive here at Idaho State University. Through this recommendation process, you can play an important role in shaping the future of our student body.

To recommend a student please send an email to isuamb@isu.edu by Friday, Oct. 7 at 5 p.m.

Central Academic Advising, the Career Center, pre-Health Professions Advising, the Graduate School, and Office of Research have teamed together to create two separate career and major exploration fairs on Oct. 4 and 5

Idaho State University Central Academic Advising, the Career Center, pre-Health Professions Advising, the Graduate School, and Office of Research have teamed together to create two separate career and major exploration fairs on Oct. 4 and 5.

Both fairs are open to all ISU students, high school seniors, and community members interested in exploring major and career options at the undergraduate and post-graduate level.

The Health Professions and ISU Graduate Programs Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 4, will be held in the ISU Pond Student Union from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Health professions programs from around the country, as well as health programs at Idaho State University, will be here to talk with students and others who are interested in pursuing professional healthcare degrees in medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, and other allied health fields.

Those interested in continuing their education are also invited to come explore the graduate degree options available across campus. The Office of Research will also be present to help students learn about research taking place at ISU. Current and prospective students are invited to attend.

The ISU Majors and Minors Fair, "Rope in a Major," on Wednesday, Oct. 5, will focus on undergraduate programs available at ISU, with the intent of assisting undecided students in choosing their major and minor programs. It will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Pond Student Union.

This year, to highlight the extraordinary research opportunities available to ISU undergraduates, the Office of Research will be on hand to showcase studies conducted in 2010-11 by ISU undergraduates, identify research being conducted in various disciplines on campus, and provide information and assistance with finding research opportunities.

Both these events are part of the semester long "Harvest Your Potential" series. For more information on "Harvest Your Potential," visit www.isu.edu/advising or contact Nancy Goodman at goodnanc@isu.edu or (208) 282-5412.

The Pond Student Union is hosting an opening reception for the Metals Guild student organization on Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in the Rendezvous Mind's Eye Gallery

The Pond Student Union is hosting an opening reception for the Metals Guild student organization on Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in the Rendezvous Mind's Eye Gallery.

The Metals Guild is presenting the exhibit, "Mentioning Unmentionables."

Where is the boundary between public and private information? Who sets the standards for appropriate vs. inappropriate behavior, imagery, or ideas? In an age where few subjects seem taboo and virtually anything is accessible via technology, how can anything truly be private? Explore these questions in this multi-media, multi-dimensional, multi-artist installation.

The exhibit will be on display through the month of October. The Mind's Eye Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 8 am to 5 pm.

For more information please contact Corinne McCullough at mccucori@isu.edu or 282-3451.

The Psychology Clinic features new faculty and expanded services for the 2011-12 academic year

The Idaho State University Psychology Clinic features new faculty and expanded services for the 2011-12 academic year.

The ISU Department of Psychology has added two new full-time faculty members, Kimberly Nylen, Ph.D., and Courtney Haight, Ph.D.

The addition of Nylen and Haight enables the ISU Psychology Clinic to offer additional psychological services, including more services for women and children, to the citizens of southeastern Idaho.

"Depression is very common in women who are pregnant or postpartum," Nylen said. "We are extremely excited to offer a low-cost option for specialty treatment to women who are pregnant, thinking about getting pregnant, or who have recently had a baby."

Nylen, who is also serving as the new director of the ISU Psychology Clinic, also noted, "while there are effective treatments for depression, many women do not receive services. We hope to change that by providing another option to women in our region."

The addition of Haight will help the clinic treat children having anxiety.

"Anxiety is one of the most common problems in childhood," Haight said. "Anxiety symptoms can range from difficulty attending school, to phobias or general worry. Our clinic is very excited to work with children, their families, and other community agencies such as schools to help children in surrounding communities."

Nylen received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Iowa in 2009 and recently completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan Medical School. She has worked extensively with pregnant and postpartum women who experience symptoms of anxiety and depression during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Haight received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 2011. While at UNLV, Haight worked with families of children with difficulty attending school or experiencing distress while at school, children with a range of anxiety symptoms, and families of children who display unwillingness or reluctance to speak.

In addition to the services provided by Nylen and Haight, the ISU Psychology Clinic also offers the following:

The ISU Psychology Clinic is a university training facility. It provides low-cost psychological services to the citizens of southeastern Idaho, serving both the university and broader community. It also provides support for ongoing clinical research conducted by the Psychology Department.

Nylen and Haight, along with four additional full-time faculty, supervise approximately 20 advanced graduate students in the ISU Psychology Clinic.

Clinic hours are Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. during the school year and 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. during the summer. There is no charge for the clinic's initial intake session.

"Please note that ISU students should contact the ISU Counseling and Testing Center (282-2130) before considering our facility, as they provide psychological services to students at no cost," Nylen said.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call (208) 282-2129.

With the goal of keeping seniors on the road safe, the Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, with AARP and AAA, will be holding its second annual CarFit event

With the goal of keeping seniors on the road safe, Idaho State University's Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, with AARP and AAA, will be holding its second annual CarFit event.

On Monday, Oct.3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., mature drivers are invited to find their perfect fit in their vehicle to ensure safe driving. Drivers can sign up for the 20-minute assessment that will be performed at the north Holt Arena parking lot. Everyone is welcome, but appointments are encouraged and can be arranged by calling (208) 282-4285.

When attending a CarFit event, participants received free advice from occupational therapy students and community volunteers who have been specifically trained as CarFit technicians to assess mature driving issues. Each technician completes a 12-point checklist with each driver to address overlooked concerns like proper seat and driver positioning, pedal accessibility, use of mirrors, etc. After each individualized assessment, drivers receive on the spot advice on how to achieve their perfect and safest fit for driving.

This CarFit event, sponsored by the ISU Occupational Therapy program, is the only CarFit program in Idaho. As the number of independent senior citizens increase in our area, occupational therapists help seniors adjust to changes caused by aging, and teach them how to remain safely on their own. While an occupational therapist helps mature drivers find their safest driving fit in their vehicle, they will not assess a driver's ability to drive a car.

Dr. Ted Peterson, the event coordinator and professor of occupational therapy, says the role of an occupational therapist is to help adults remain safely independent. With CarFit, serious issues regarding driving postures and solutions are addressed. The event is designed to be convenient and nonthreatening.

"Our job isn't to take away your independence, such as driving your own car and living on your own," said Dr Peterson. "It's a matter of safety and responding to the natural changes of life, and adjusting your activity based on those changes.

CarFit was originally organized in 2005 by the American Society on Aging in collaboration with AARP, AAA, and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) to educate the growing population of mature drivers on individual driver safety. Since 2005, 90 percent of surveyed participants believe that CarFit is a useful event, and 88% of the surveyed participants reported making at least one change suggested at CarFit.

"Driver safety is critically important, especially among mature drivers," said Peterson. "Making this a priority in our community will help our drivers remain active longer and be safe."