Institute of
Rural Health

  • Our Goal - Partner with other Idaho suicide prevention groups to create an infrastructure for reducing suicide attempts and completions among Idaho youth aged 10-24 regardless of ethnic/racial heritage.
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Institute of Rural Health

Understanding and Conducting an Initial Suicide Risk Assessment

Recording

Downloads

Handout 1 - Simple Suicide Risk Assessment

Handout 2 - Is Path Warm Pocket Card

Slides from Presentation

Links

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Risk Questions

Introduction

In this webinar participants will learn about the signs and symptoms of suicide, the role of traumatic stress as a risk factor, methods for conducting an initial assessment and information about how to get additional help for those who are at higher risk. The course is designed for people in helping professions including police, emergency service personnel, and emergency department personnel such as nurses who are not mental health professionals. For more information go to www.isu.edu/irh.

The webinar is free. It was broadcast live on Tuesday, 28 September 2010 at 1:00 pm Mountain Standard Time.

Why Should I Take This Course?

Many hotline and helpline operators, first responders, and emergency department staff face situations in which they believe a person is in danger from self-harm. Initial assessment of suicide risk is an important way of identifying who is at risk for suicide and can benefit from immediate medical and mental health assessment and assistance.

Conducting an assessment for suspected sexual assault or family violence is a routine part of information gathering from people who are in an emergency. Suicide risk assessments are less often conducted. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth 14-24. In Idaho, suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth 14-2 and across all ages, suicide is the eighth leading cause of death. While suicide is a relatively low occurrence, suicide attempts are more frequent. There are an estimated 11 suicide attempts that require medical attention for every one completed suicide. The number of people who contemplate or attempt suicide that does not require medical attention is much higher. A CDC survey of youth in grades 9 to 12 in public and private schools in the United States found that 17 percent reported "seriously considering" suicide, 13 percent reported creating a plan and 8 percent reported trying to take their own life in the 12 months preceding the survey.

Who Should Participate?

The course is designed for people in helping professions including police, emergency service personnel, and emergency department personnel such as nurses. The course is intended for those with basic health and emergency training who are not mental health professionals.

What Will I Learn?

In this webinar participants will learn about the signs and symptoms of suicide, the role of traumatic stress as a risk factor, methods for conducting an initial assessment and information about how to get additional help for those who are at higher risk.

When was the Webinar broadcast?

The webinar was broadcast live on Tuesday, 28 September 2010 at 1:00 pm Mountain Standard Time.

Who Will Teach The Course?

The course was conducted by Dr Beth Hudnall Stamm, PhD. Dr Stamm is the Project Director and Principal Investigator for the Idaho Awareness to Action Youth Suicide Prevention Program. She is a Research Professor at the Idaho State University Institute of Rural Health. Dr Stamm was recognized by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies for "fundamental contributions to the international public understanding of trauma" and by the Psychological Association as one of the "outstanding psychologists of this generation." Working primarily with rural underserved peoples, Stamm's efforts focuses on suicide prevention, traumatic stress and secondary traumatic stress among people in the helping professions. Her work is used in over 30 countries and diverse fields including suicide prevention, health care, bioterrorism and disaster responding, news media, and the military. She makes her home in a log cabin in the mountains of Idaho with her historian-husband and her service dog, Sophie.



This program is NOT intended to and does NOT provide crisis intervention. If you are in crisis, or have concerns about a loved one, call 1-800-273-TALK or go to http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

This document was developed under a grant 1U79SM059188-01 REVISED from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, (DHHS). The contents are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of DHHS.

Last Modified: 09/28/10 at 06:08:58 PM