ISU Headlines

Idaho Museum of Natural History to offer Summer Science Snack program for young children

Posted June 1, 2011

The Idaho Museum of Natural History will offer fun, educational opportunities for children this summer in its summer science snack program scheduled in July for children in first through third, and fourth through sixth grades.

Three 2-1/2-hour classes will be offered Monday-Friday July 18-22 and July 25-29. 

Class fees are $40 per student, or $35 for each additional child per family.

Classes are taught by elementary education pre-service teachers from the Idaho State University’s College of Education.

All classes will be held at the Idaho Museum of Natural History, located at Dillon Street and South Fifth Avenue on the campus of Idaho State University in Pocatello. For more information, please call Rebecca Thorne-Ferrel at (208) 282-2195. A full list of classes for children and adults can be found on the Museum’s website, http://imnh.isu.edu.

Summer Science Snack Classes offered include:

July 18 – 22, Monday – Friday – "On the Hunt: Predator/Prey Animals"

This class is for students who have completed first through third grades and will be taught 9-11:30 a.m. by Alecia Eidinger.

What does it mean to be a wild animal? We will be learning about the habitats and behaviors of wild animals and about the relationship between predator and prey animals. Come and learn about the special physical advantages predator animals have that help them hunt.

July 18 – 22, Monday – Friday – "Clouds, Rain, Wind and Weather"

This class is for students who have completed first through third grades and will be taught 9-11:30 a.m. by Jocelyn Foreman.

Weather is more than opening the curtains in the morning and seeing if the sun is up. Join us as we investigate how weather forms, what makes the wind blow and rain fall, and how big weather systems such as hurricanes and tornadoes develop.

July 18 – 22, Monday – Friday – "BlastOff! The Physics and Fun of Rockets"

This class is for students who have completed fourth through sixth grades and will be taught from 1-3:30 p.m. by Kelly Pokorny.

Explore the different forms and physics of rocketry through the history, science and engineering of these exciting and versatile projectiles. We will all become “rocket scientists” as we build our own rockets, which we will launch at the end of the week

July 25 – 29, Monday – Friday – "Digging Up a Dino-mite Time"

9:00 – 11:30 a.m.

This class is for students who have completed first through third grades and will be taught 9-11:30 a.m. by Alecia Eidinger.

What is a dinosaur? Were they different from other animals who lived at the same time? How do we find the fossils of dinosaurs? We will be taking a huge look back at the world of the dinosaurs and learning about how they lived, survived and adapted themselves to the environment of 150 million years ago

July 25 – 29, Monday – Friday – "Uncharted Territories: Cartography"

This class is for students who have completed fourth through sixth grades and will be taught from 9-11:30 a.m. by Jocelyn Foreman.

Cartography is the science of making maps that are true to the lay of the land. Have you ever been confused about where you were and looked at a map to find your way? Join us as we learn how mapping helps us form a deeper understanding of the shape of the land and how to represent it so others can find their way. We will be making some maps of our own.

 July 25 – 29, Monday – Friday – "Living in Space: The Final Frontier"

This class is for students who have completed fourth through sixth grades and will be taught from 1-3:30 p.m. by Kelly Pokorny.

You are heading out into the vast unknown reaches of space. You'll be away from Earth for years. How do you exercise in space? Can you eat your favorite foods? Can you bring a pet? We will answer these questions and explore both the challenges and rewards of living in the "Final Frontier."

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