John Davis
Email: jmdavis@isu.edu

Hometown: Clearwater, Florida
BA: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
PhD: University of Georgia

 

John was a postdoctoral researcher from 2009-2012, and continues to be an active collaborator with the ISU Stream Ecology Center from his position as an ORISE Fellow with the Environmental Protection Agency in Athens, GA. He received his B.Sc. from the University of Florida and Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. His doctoral research studied the effects of long-term nutrient enrichment on macroinvertebrate food webs in a detritus-based headwater stream. As a postdoctoral researcher, John continued his interest in studying the effects of land-use and global change on macroinvertebrate food web structure and function. In collaboration with researchers from ISU and various other research institutions, he participated in studies of the effects of global climate change on food webs and ecosystem processes within the Salmon River Basin, Idaho. Because climate change within this ecoregion is predicted to alter forest communities via changes in fire and precipitation regimes, these stream ecosystems may experience substantial alteration of their structure and function. By resampling study sites along the Salmon River that were originally a part of the River Continuum Project (1970's and 80's), this large-scale comparative approach has helped assess whether recent shifts in climatic, hydrologic and fire regimes have altered the Salmon Rivers functional state. As the Salmon River is relatively unimpacted and unregulated, this research is allowing us to better understand how large unregulated rivers may respond to future global climate change.

Selected Publications

Davis, J M., C.V. Baxter, B.T. Crosby, J.L. Pierce, E. J. Rosi-Marshall. 2013. Anticipating stream ecosystem responses to climate change: toward predictions that incorporate effects via land-water linkages. Ecosystems 16: 909922.

Davis, J M., C.V. Baxter, G.W. Minshall, N.F. Olson, C. Tang, and B.T. Crosby. 2013. Climate-induced shift in hydrologic regime alters basal resource dynamics in a wilderness river ecosystem. Freshwater Biology 58:306319.

Davis, J.M., A.D. Rosemond, and G. Small. 2011. Increasing donor ecosystem productivity decreases terrestrial consumer reliance on a stream resource subsidy. Oecologia 167: 821-834.

Davis, J.M. A.D. Rosemond, S.L. Eggert, W.F. Cross, and J.B. Wallace. 2010. Nutrient enrichment differentially affects body sizes of primary consumers and predators in a detritus-based stream. Limnology and Oceanography 55(6):23052316

Davis, J.M., A.D. Rosemond, S.L. Eggert, W.F. Cross and J.B. Wallace. 2010. Long-term nutrient enrichment decouples predator and prey production. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107:121-126.

Kappes, J. J., Jr., and J.M. Davis. 2008. Evidence of positive indirect effects within a community of cavity-nesting vertebrates. Condor 110: 441-449.

Davis, J. M., K. E. Sieving, and J. J. Kappes, Jr. 2005. Red-cockaded woodpecker roost cavity defense during the non-breeding season. Florida Field Naturalist 33:81-92.

Davis, J. M., K. E. Sieving, and J. J. Kappes, Jr. 2004. Red-cockaded woodpecker roost cavity defense during the non-breeding season. Pages 499-500 in Red-cockaded woodpecker: road to recovery (R. Costa and S. J. Daniels, eds). Hancock House Publishers, Blaine, Washington, USA.

Kappes, J. J. Jr., J. M. Davis, M. D. Adams, J. Garrison, P. Catlett, M. Corby, and R. Costa. 2004. Status and management of red-cockaded woodpeckers at Camp Blanding training site, Florida. Pages 198-202 in Red-cockaded woodpecker: road to recovery (R. Costa and S. J. Daniels, eds). Hancock House Publishers, Blaine, Washington, USA.