Health Professions Advising

Medical

ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE (M.D.)

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

 

ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE (M.D.)

Qualification for Application

An excellent general source of information for the premedical student is the book, Medical School Admission Requirements , U.S. and Canada (MSAR) which is published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), 2450 N Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20037-1129, Phone (202)828-0416, FAX (202) 828-1123, (web site: www.aamc.org ). This book is updated yearly. You may also access the American Medical Association (AMA) on their homepage at http://www.ama-assn.org.

The student planning to apply to medical school is not limited to any specific major area in pursuing a baccalaureate degree. There are no set requirements for application to medical school, other than residency requirements and certain subject requirements. Most schools insist that the applicant have a year each of organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biology, and physics with labs. Minimum ISU courses required by most medical schools include, but are not limited to, the following:

MATH 1147 Precalculus 5 credits
MATH 1160 Brief Calculus 4 credits (not all schools require calculus)
CHEM 1111, 1112 General Chemistry 9 credits total
ENGL 1101, 1102 English Composition 6 credits total
BIOL 2206 Cell Biology 3 credits
CHEM 3301, 3303 3302, 3304 Organic Chemistry I & II (with lab) 8 credits total
PHYS 1111, 1112, 1113, 1114 General Physics with Lab 8 credits total

The prospective applicant would find, in addition to the above, additional biology courses to be advantageous. Highly recommended would be Comparative Embryology and Human Development, and Biochemistry. Most medical schools stress the importance of the applicant being well-rounded, so a sufficient number of non-science courses should be included also. The applicant should consider this when developing the plan of study for his/her area of major. Consultation with an advisor is especially important.

The premedical student should have a broad background before taking the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in order to perform to the best of his/her ability. The courses outlined above should provide a good basis of preparation for the exam. The student is highly encouraged to have completed a physiology course (human or animal) before taking the MCAT. There is no minimum grade point average (GPA). However, the student's GPA is very important and medical schools give much consideration to the student's grades. They are concerned with grades received in both science and non-science courses. Idaho residents who are successful at gaining admission to an MD school typically have a GPA between 3.6 and 3.7or higher.

Although most medical schools may potentially accept a student with only three years of undergraduate work completed, the reality is that essentially all those accepted by medical schools will have completed a baccalaureate degree by the time they matriculate into medical school. For example, most medical schools state that between 99% and 100% of accepted students has at least a baccalaureate degree. Almost all (about 3 do not) medical schools require that the MCAT be taken no later than the year previous to the year of entry into medical school. There are no minimum score requirements for acceptance, nor are scores received the sole basis for gaining admittance. However, the scores received are very important. Besides academic accomplishments, medical schools are interested in the student as a person. An applicant will be asked why he/she wants to be a doctor. The school will want to know about any medical experiences the student has had, as well as extracurricular and special activities in which the student has been involved.

Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)

The MCAT is administered several times throughout the year. You must register for the exam about 5 weeks before the exam administration. For specific test dates, registration deadlines and registration forms, consult the ISU Counseling and Testing Center, your advisor or www.aamc.org/mcat. You may also write to:

MCAT Program
2255 North Dubuque Road
P.O. Box 4056
Iowa City, IA 52243
phone (319)338-1357
email (preferred) mcat_req@act.org

You may also consult the AAMC web site: http://www.aamc.org click on "MCAT". The courses listed under Qualifications for Application will provide the minimum preparation for the examination, and it is recommended that the student spend considerable time preparing for the exam and familiarizing oneself with the testing procedure. Commercial test preparation courses are available. Several full length MCAT exams can be purchased from the AAMC, either in paper form or electronically. Go to www.aamc.org for details.

American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS)

AMCAS is a service through which the applicant completes one application form which is sent to each medical school to which the student wishes to apply. The fee for the service increases with the number of schools the applicant requests the application to be sent. Approximately 90% of the US allopathic medical schools participate in AMCAS. In applying to schools which do not participate in AMCAS, the applicant must write to the individual school to request application materials. Consultation of the MSAR or AMCAS application materials will indicate which medical schools do not participate in AMCAS.

The AMCAS application includes a personal comments section, an extracurricular activities and work section, and a transcript section. The application also requires other personal information, such as age, state, residency, and education of parents. More information may be obtained by writing to the following address:

AMCAS
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN MEDICAL COLLEGES
SECTION FOR STUDENT SERVICES
SUITE 201
2450 N. STREET, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20037-1131
PHONE: (202) 828-0600

NOTE: the AMCAS application went online for the 2002 entering class. Access to this online application is through the AMCAS section of the www.aamc.org web site.

Application Procedure

The most advantageous sequence for filing applications begins the semester before you plan to apply to medical school. At ISU, this sequence should begin with the student arranging with the Chair of the ISU Health Professions Advisory Committee for an interview by that committee. From this interview and other evaluative materials, the committee will compile an Idaho State University composite letter of evaluation. Interviews for this process will take place in the spring semester prior to beginning the application process. For most applicants, that will be the spring semester of the junior year. Contact the Health Professions Advisory Committee office in November or December of the junior year to begin a file. The student will register to take the MCAT (preparation for the MCAT should begin six to nine months prior to that time, however). The AMCAS application should be completed and mailed to AMCAS for distribution to the schools requested. ALWAYS APPLY EARLY!! The AMCAS application can be sent in as early as June 1 of the calendar year before the anticipated year of entry into medical school. NOTE: submission dates have been somewhat fluid since initiation of the online AMCAS application. Consult that web site for current dates.

It is highly recommended that it be submitted no later than July 15. About one month after submitting your AMCAS application, you will begin to receive "supplemental" or "secondary" applications from medical schools. To maximize your chances for admission, return these forms QUICKLY (we would suggest within one or two weeks of receipt). Once a student's application is complete, invitations for interviews by medical schools can come anytime after August. Ideally, this will be followed by acceptance by one or more medical schools sometime from January until the medical school's classes begin in the fall.

Early Decision Programs

About seventy-five schools participate in the EDP (Early Decision Program). An applicant may apply to such a school from June 1 to August 1 of the year preceding anticipated entry into medical school. The school then makes an early decision about the applicant, and notifies him/her of acceptance or no acceptance by October 1. Only one EDP application may be made by any applicant, and if accepted, the applicant may not apply to any additional medical schools.

Usually Early Decision applicants who are not accepted by the Early Decision program are reconsidered with the general applicant pool at that same school. In addition, the applicant still has time to apply to additional medical schools for the same anticipated year of entry.

Advantages of applying for Early Decision include the possibility of receiving early word of acceptance, saving the money of applying to additional schools and sometimes an increased chance of acceptance. Disadvantages include being limited to only one early application, being committed to the EDP school if accepted there, and the fact that your "first choice" school may not have an EDP.

Be aware that EDP deadlines require that ALL required materials be received by the medical school admissions office by September 1 of the year of application. Therefore, the MCAT must be taken no later than April of the year the student plans an EDP application.

Medical School Interview

Essentially all US medical schools require a personal interview before acceptance. Generally applications are screened and only the most promising applicants are interviewed. If you are granted an interview, that means that the school is definitely considering you for acceptance. Standards vary from school to school, but generally one-fourth to one-half of the applicants receive interviews at a given school. That number, of course, will be lower when the number of applicants is higher.

The interview serves to reveal your personal characteristics to the interviewers. Medical schools invest considerable time and money in medical students, and they want to make sure that they select individuals who will benefit the medical profession. In addition, you will have the opportunity to clarify any information on your application and to ask questions about the medical school. Applicants are encouraged to interview on the medical school campus if offered that opportunity.

The interview date is usually selected by the medical school admissions committee members at their convenience. The interview is carried out at the medical school, although occasionally an eastern medical school will interview western applicants at some western location

Interviews vary in time, length, number of interviewers, and interviewing format. They are generally conducted from August through April of the academic year preceding anticipated entry into medical school.

Be prepared to justify why you want a career in medicine, and why you think you will be a good physician. Interviewing is a skill; therefore, interviewing practice is recommended. It helps you to deal with potential questions, practice expressing your philosophies, and develop composure and effective body language.

Be sure to read all correspondence from medical school carefully. Some schools require that you specifically request an interview, while most schools automatically consider you from your application and notify you that they want to interview you.

An excellent web site for interview feedback is available. This site contains relatively current interview reports on every US medical school (including the osteopathic schools). That site is www.studentdoctor.net.

Schools that Admit Idaho Residents to Medical School

Since state taxpayers support state medical schools, out of state residents generally have a lower probability of being admitted to these schools. A highly qualified Idaho applicant may have a chance of admission to certain state medical school. Medical School Admission Requirements lists the number of in-state and out-of-state applicants accepted for each US medical school. The number of applicants to medical school is presently increasing dramatically, so there will probably be decreasing opportunities for nonresident applications to state medical schools.

The Idaho applicant to medical school relies primarily on two avenues of admission - Idaho's agreements with other states that have medical schools, and entrance into private medical schools that admit large numbers of out-of-state residents. These two avenues are discussed below.

Agreements With Other States

These agreements involve allocation of large sums of money by the Idaho State Legislature to neighboring states in return for acceptance of a given number of Idaho applicants into that state's medical school. The residency requirements for applications to these programs are very strict. During the process of application, you must complete a Certificate of Residency which you obtain from the following addresses for each of the two programs:

WWAMI Program (U. Of Washington) (U. Of Utah)
Director of Admissions Office of Admissions, Box 8270
University of Idaho Idaho State University
Moscow, Idaho 83843 Pocatello, ID 83209
Phone: (208) 885-6325 Phone: (208) 236-2475

Idaho currently has agreements with two neighboring states, Washington and Utah, for admitting Idaho residents into their medical institutions. These programs are called the WWAMI and the University of Utah programs, respectively.

Through the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) Program 18 seats are reserved for Idaho residents in the University of Washington School of Medicine first-year class. The first year of medical school is spent at the University of Idaho in Moscow and Washington State University in Pullman, and subsequent years are at the University of Washington in Seattle. Medical students admitted to the WWAMI Program from Montana, Alaska, and Washington spend their first year in Laramie, Bozeman, Anchorage, and Pullman respectively.

According to developers of the WWAMI program, "The WWAMI program is an experiment in decentralized medical education which proposes to avoid prohibitive construction costs by utilizing already existing facilities at state universities, and by using community physicians as medical faculty for varying periods of time." Preceptorships with area physicians are available for first-year medical students, and clinical rotations in clerkships in later years are offered to outlying areas in four states. Through capitalizing on the resources of neighboring state universities and the clinical expertise of community practitioners and the medical center, the WWAMI program is expanding medical school admission for students from all four states, increasing clinical training opportunities in the primary care disciplines and broadening continuing medical education programs offered to health professionals in the local communities.

For more information on WWAMI, write to the following:

Office of Admission, SM-22
University of Washington School of Medicine
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: (206) 543-7321

Director
Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho 83843
Phone: (208) 885-6696

Under the Utah Contract, eight seats are reserved yearly in the University of Utah School of Medicine first year class for Idaho residents. All four years of MD training take place at the University Of Utah School Of Medicine in Salt Lake City.

Tuition at the University of Utah School of Medicine for Idaho residents is the same as that for Utah residents. Tuition at the University of Washington School of Medicine for Idaho residents is the same tuition as a Washington resident. NOTE: Even though the State of Idaho has no formal agreement with the University of Nevada School of Medicine, that medical school has recently begun accepting significant numbers of Idaho residents. Accepted students are allowed to become Nevada residents during the first year of medical school at that institution. Thus, the total 4 year cost of that program is only slightly more than either the WWAMI program or the Utah contract.

Private Medical Schools

Private medical schools (as opposed to public, state-supported schools) usually accept more out-of-state than in state residents. Medical School Admission Requirements lists for each US medical school the number of out-of state residents and instate residents who applied and the number accepted from each group for the previous academic year.

Private medical schools which have, within the last decade, accepted Idaho residents include Creighton University in Omaha, George Washington University in Washington, DC, Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, St. Louis University, University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Others include University of New England, University of Nebraska, University of Nevada, University of Washington, University of Utah, Cornell, Toledo, Temple and Virginia Commonwealth. An ISU student was also accepted at Yale University School of Medicine in 1997. The Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS) has also been a consistent acceptor of ISU students.

In 2002, 59 residents of Idaho were accepted by MD medical schools. Eighteen of these were to the WWAMI program, eight to the University of Utah, and thirty-three to other schools.

Tuition at private medical schools ranges from about $28,000 to over $35,000 per year.

Acceptance to Medical School

During recent years, nationally about 50% of the applicants to medical schools have been successful in gaining admission. That figure will increase somewhat as the number of applicants have shown a continuing decline in 1996, when a record number of persons applied to medical school.

In recent years, ISU students have been admitted to some state medical schools as non residents. Those include U of CT, U of KS, U of CO, and U of HI.

The American Association of Medical Colleges has created a schedule of uniform acceptance dates for notifying applicants of their admission to medical school. These dates are October 15, November 15, December 15, January 15, February 15, and March 15. Most medical schools mail their rejection letters promptly so these applicants will have maximum time to make alternative plans. Be aware, however, that the current large size of the applicant pool has placed strains on the admissions office at most medical schools, resulting in significant delays in admissions decisions.

This handout has been written primarily with the Idaho resident pre-professional student in mind. Non-Idaho resident students attending Idaho State University who are studying a pre-health professional curriculum should contact their state medical school system, as well as consulting closely with the Health Professions Advisory Committee at ISU. The committee does have information about various state programs on file. States which have medical schools may require additional information and different application procedures. We also have a compiled list of pre-medical advisors in other states that can provide information and advice.

When You Are Ready To Apply

Be sure to consult with the Chair of the ISU Health Professions Advisory Committee. Obtain up-to-date and more detailed information on the schools you are interested in and what their requirements are. Be realistic about your chances. If you are sincere about becoming an MD, prepare and plan well so that your chances are maximized. You will not be admitted by luck alone, although luck does help.

Be aware that osteopathic medicine (D.O. degree) is a field that provides equal training and opportunities for medical practice. It should be considered along with allopathic medicine (MD degree) as an avenue to the practice of medicine. The GPA and MCAT scores required for admission to osteopathic medical schools are somewhat lower than required for admission to an MD school, although these differences have narrowed significantly in the last few years, due to the large size of the applicant pools. Consult the Osteopathic Medicine handout for more information or consult with the Chair of the ISU Health Professions Advisory Committee.

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

Today in the U.S., there are two recognized "schools" of medicine: Allopathic medicine, which grants the Doctor of Medicine (MD), and Osteopathic medicine, which grants the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). Osteopathic physicians enjoy the same legal rights and privileges as MDs in all fifty states. Osteopathic physicians practice medicine much the same as MDs with a few important differences. Like the MD, the DO utilizes ail of the latest technology, therapies, procedures, and drugs which modern science provides. However, the DO is trained much more extensively in methods of palpation (touching), an important diagnostic method. Also, the DO is trained in manipulative therapy. Osteopathic manipulation is a whole system of diagnosis, appraisal, and therapy designed to preserve health and prevent the spread of disease. Osteopathic physicians are trained to provide holistic health care. Finally, osteopathic medical schools are geared to produce primary care physicians who will enter into family practice. Many DOs also specialize in a wide range of medical specialties.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR APPLICATION

All 26 colleges of osteopathic medicine require the following pre-osteopathic medical courses. ln general, you may follow a regular premedical curriculum:

Organic Chemistry with lab (1 Year)
Biology with lab (1 year)
Physics with lab (1 year)
English Composition (1 Year)

STANDARDIZED TEST - MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMISSION TEST (MCAT)

All applicants to colleges of osteopathic medicine are required to take the Medical College Admissions Test no later than the calendar year prior to entering medical school. The MCAT is offered throughout the year. Application deadline for the MCAT is approximately 7-8 weeks prior to the test date. MCAT registration, plus other resource materials for MCAT preparation can be accessed online at www.aamc.org/mcat.

CENTRALIZED APPLICATION SERVICE

All osteopathic colleges of medicine utilize a centralized application service, AACOMAS (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service). The address is the following:

AACOMAS 5550 Friendship Boulevard
Suite 310
Chevy Chase, MD 20815-7231
(301) 968-41e0
http://www.aacom.org

AACOM (the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) is at the same address, Phone (301) 968-4100. AACOMAS applications are available on line at http://www.aacom.org.

INTERVIEWS

As a part of the application, many colleges of osteopathic medicine require or strongly suggest that the applicant be interviewed by a practicing osteopathic physician. The osteopathic physician in turn will send a letter of evaluation to the Individual schools. Also, before an applicant can enter an osteopathic medical school, he/she must be interviewed at the Individual college of osteopathic medicine by an admission committee.

RECIPROCAL AGREEMENTS

Idaho is not presently involved in any reciprocal agreements involving colleges of osteopathic medicine. Some western states support their residents in the College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific (COMP), at the Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, CA, through the WICHE program.

ACCEPTANCE INFORMATION

Admission to a college of osteopathic medicine is competitive. The colleges are able to select the members of an entering class from among large numbers of highly qualified applicants.

ISU students have been admitted in recent years to the following schools:

Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University
Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern
*College University of Osteopathic Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri (University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine
*Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical Center, Des Moines, lowa
*College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
*Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine
Lake Erle College of Osteopathic Medicine
Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
New York College of Osteopathic Medicine
Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Nova Southeastern College of Osteopathic Medicine
Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine
Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine
University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

*Major schools for ISU students. The other schools have also accepted significant numbers of ISU students.

lf you are interested in a career as a primary care practitioner, you should consider Osteopathic medicine. We recommend contacting a practicing osteopathic physician and talk to him/her about Osteopathic medicine. The Osteopathic colleges are actively seeking qualified applicants who are genuinely interested in pursuing an Osteopathic medical career. lf you choose to apply to both Allopathic and Osteopathic medical schools, be very sure that you are able to indicate and express an honest interest in Osteopathic medicine. Even though Osteopathic medical schools recognize that students must consider alternatives in development of a health career, they do want to accept students who have a sincere interest in Osteopathic medicine.

COLLEGES OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

A.T. STILL UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHTC MEDTCTNE - MESA (ATSU/COM-MESA)
800 West Jefferson Street
Kirksville, MO 63501
Phone Toll free: (866) 626-2878 Ext. 2237 or (660) 626-2237 Fax. (660) 626-2969

A.T. STILL UNIVERSITY KIRKSVILLE COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDTCINE (ATSU/COM)
800 West Jefferson Street
Kirksville, MO 63501
Phone Toll free: (866) 626-2878 Ext. 2237 or (660) 626-2237 Fax (660) 626-2969

ARIZONA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE OF MIDWESTERN UNIVERSITY (AZCOM)
19555 N. 59th Avenue
Glendale AZ 85308
Phone Toll Free: (888) 247-9277 or Phone: (623) 572-3215

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHTC MEDICINE OF MIDWESTERN UNIVERSITY (CCOM)
555 31st Street
Downers Grove, lL 60515
Phone (630)515-7200 or 1-800-458-6253

DES MOINES UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE
3200 Grand Avenue
Des Moines, lA 50312
Phone (515) 271-1499 Toll Free. (800) 24A-2767 ext. 1499 Fax: (51 S) 271-7163

KANSAS CITY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND BIOSCIENCES COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE
(KCUMB-COM)
1750 lndependence Ave.
Kansas City, MO 64106-1453
Phone (800) 234-4847 or (816) 283-2352

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (LECOM)
1858 West Grandview Boulevard
Erie, PA 16509
Phone (814)866-6641

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE BRANDERTON CAMPUS (LECOM-BRANDERTON)
5000 Lakewood Ranch Boulevard
Bradenton, FL 34211
Phone (941) 756-0690

LINCOLN MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY DEBUSK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (LMU-DCOM)
6965 Cumberland Gap Parkway
Harrogate, TN 37752
Phone (800) 325-0900 Ext 7090 Fax: (423) 869-7078

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (MSUCOM)
4136 East Fee Hall
East Lansing, Ml 48824
Phone (517)353-7740

NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (NSU-COM)
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328
Phone (954) 262-1141

NEW YORK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE OF NEW YORK INSTTTUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (NYCOM)
PO Box 8000
Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000
Phone (516) 686-3747

OHIO UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHTC MEDICINE (OUCOM)
102 Grosvenor Hall
Athens, OH 45701-2979
Phone (740)593-4313 Toll-Free: (800) 345-1560

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC
MEDICINE (OSU-COM)
1111 West 17th St
Tulsa, OK 74107
Phone (918) 561-8421 Toll Free: (800) 677-1972

PACIFIC NORTHWEST UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE
111 South 33'd Street, Suite 104
Yakima, WA 98901
Phone 1-509-452-5100 or 1-866-329-0521

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (PCOM)
4170 City Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19131
Phone 1-800-999-6998

PIKEVILLE COLLEGE SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (PCSOM)
147 Sycamore Street
Pikeville, KY 41501
Phone (606)218-5406

ROCKY VISTA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE
8401 S. Chambers Road
Parker, CO 80134
Phone (303) 373.2008

TOURO COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE-NEW YORK (TOUROCOM)
230 West 125th Street
New York, NY 10027
Phone {212) 851-1199

TOURO UNIVERSITY CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (TUCOM-CA)
Mare island 1310 Johnson Lane
Vallejo, CA 94592
Phone: Toll Free (from CA): (888) 880-7336 Toll Free (Outside CA): (888) 887-7336

TOURO UNIVERSITY - NEVADA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (TUCOM'NV}
874 American Pacific Drive
Henderson, Nevada 89014
Phone 702-777-1750 or (702) 777 -1751

UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY.SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (UMDNJ-SOM)
One Medical Center Drive
Suite 210, Stratford, NJ 08084
Phone (856) 566-7050

UNIVERSITY OF New England COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (UNECOM)
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, Maine 04005
Phone 207-602-2329

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER AT Fort Worth TEXAS COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (UNTHSC-COMS)
3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard
Fort Worth, TX 761A7-2699
Phone {817) 735-2204 or 1 -800-535-8266

EDWARD VlA VIRGINIA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (VCOM)
2265 Kraft Drive
Blacksburg, VA 24060
Phone (540) 231-6138

WEST VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (WVSOM)
400 North Lee Street
Lewisburg, West Virginia 24901
Phone ln West Virginia 1-800-356-7836 **Outside West Virginia 1-800-537-7477

WESTERN UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE OF THE PACIFIC, (WESTERN U/COMP)
309 East Second Street College Plaza
Pomona, CA 91766-1889
Phone (909) 623-6116


IDAHO STATE UNIVERSITY

921 South 8th Avenue
Pocatello, Idaho, 83209