Department of Chemistry

Gayl H. Wiegand

Emeritus Professor

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1965

B.S., University of Iowa, 1961

Research area: Organosulfur, organoselenium, and organoiodine chemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, kinetics of slow chemical reactions, chemical education - particularly in teaching chemistry to nonscientists and to students in the health related professions.

Interests

1) Chemistry for the Nonspecialist

Much of my recent work has been to develop a lower division college course in chemistry for nonspecialists (students not majoring in a science discipline) that would not only introduce basic chemical concepts and explore how this scientific knowledge bears on society (as most courses of this kind do), but also would examine what science is, how scientific knowledge is gained, how the scientific process works, and what science can and cannot do. These efforts formed the basis for my textbook for nonspecialists, Models of Matter: Principles and Perspectives of Chemistry, which was published by West Publishing Co. I always welcome comments/questions about teaching chemistry to nonspecialists as well as about the book.

2) Introductory Chemistry for Students in the Health Related Professions

I have successfully used my text, Introductory Chemistry for the Health Related Professions, for about seven years in teaching our CHEM 101 (Essentials of Chemistry I), the first of a two-semester general, organic, and biochemistry (GOB) course for students in the health related professions. I am seeking a publisher for the work, which presently covers the "general" part of the GOB sequence. I am comfortable writing the organic portion of a text of this kind, but would need a co-author for the biochemistry.

3) The Use of Kinetics in Geothermal Energy Prospecting

I still maintain an interest in using the extent of slow chemical reactions to measure relative integrated shallow soil temperatures for the purpose of finding heat flow from below ground. Customarily, in kinetic studies the extent of a chemical reaction is measured as a function of time and temperature in order to obtain Ea. However, once Ea is known the extent of reaction can be used to measure the temperature of the environment of a chemical system if the time of exposure to that environment is known. We have developed two good chemical systems for making these measurements in the field, easily and inexpensively. A summary of the technique and how it works can be found in our paper in the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research.

Journal Publications

Models of Matter: Principles and Perspectives of Chemistry, West Publishing Co. 1995 (A chemistry text for students whose majors are not in the sciences.)

Introductory Chemistry for the Health Related Professions, ISU Chemistry. (A chemistry text for the first semester of a general, organic, and biochemistry course for students in the health related professions.)

Shallow temperature differences along the Deep Creek Range Front, Idaho (with H. T. Ore). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 40 (1990) pp. 123-132

Contact:

Physical Science Complex Room 352
(208) 282-4444
wieggayl@isu.edu