Biological Sciences

R. Terry Bowyer, Ph.D.

R. Terry Bowyer

Professor of Biological Sciences

Vertebrate Population Dynamics, Sexual Segregation, Birth-Site Selection, Habitat Selection, Mammalian Life-History Characteristics, Scale, Effects of Harvest on Horns and Antlers

Education

Biographical Sketch

Dr. R. Terry Bowyer is a Professor in The Department of Biological Sciences at Idaho State University. He joined the faculty at ISU in 2004 following 18 years at the Institute of Arctic Biology, and Department of Biology and Wildlife at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The Arctic Institute of North America, and The Wildlife Society. Also, Dr. Bowyer is a Professional Member of the Boone and Crockett Club. He has received the Arthur S. Einarsen Award from the Northwest Section of The Wildlife Society, The Distinguished Moose Biologists Award, and the C. Hart Merriam Award from the American Society of Mammalogists. His research also earned four Outstanding Publication Awards from The Wildlife Society, two for monographs and two articles. He has mentored 28 graduate students to the successful completion of their degrees, including 12 Ph.D.s. His research interests include the ecology and behavior of large mammals, and he has published extensively on sexual segregation and birth-site selection in ungulates. He continues to study the population ecology of ungulates and carnivores, and recently has become interested in effects of scale on life-history characteristics of mammals. Dr. Bowyer has >190 scientific publications and is an active member in several professional societies, including The Wildlife Society and American Society of Mammalogists. He and his wife Karolyn reside on a small farm in Blackfoot, ID. He is an avid angler and hunter, and especially enjoys hunting upland birds and waterfowl with his Labrador Retrievers, Pepper and Otis, and his Boykin Spaniel, Beau.

Teaching

Selected Publications (* denotes student author)

Monteith*, K.L., R.A. Long*, V.C. Bleich, J.R. Heffelfinger, P.R. Krausman, and R.T. Bowyer. 2013. Effects of harvest, culture, and climate on trends in size of horn-like structures in trophy ungulates. Wildlife Monographs 183:1-26.

Pierce, B.M., V.C. Bleich, K.L. Monteith*, and R.T. Bowyer. 2012. Top-down versus bottom-up forcing: evidence from mountain lions and mule deer. Journal of Mammalogy 93:977-988.

Bowyer, R.T., J. L. Rachlow, K. M. Stewart, and V. Van Ballenberghe. 2011. Vocalizations of Alaskan moose: female incitation of male aggression. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 65:2251-2260.

Monteith*, K.L., V.C. Bleich, T.R. Stephenson, B.M. Pierce, M.M. Conner, R.W. Klaver, and R.T. Bowyer. 2011. Timing of seasonal migration in mule deer: effects of climate, plant phenology, and life-history characteristics. Ecosphere 2:art47.

Whiting*, J. C., R.T. Bowyer, J. T. Flinders, and D. L. Eggett. 2011. Reintroduced bighorn sheep: fitness consequences of adjusting parturition to local environments. Journal of Mammalogy 92:213-220.

Whiting*, J.C., R.T. Bowyer, J.T. Flinders, V.C. Bleich, and J.G. Kie. 2010. Sexual segregation and use of water by bighorn sheep: implications for conservation. Animal Conservation 13:541-548.

Stewart, K.M., R.T. Bowyer, J.G. Kie, B.L. Dick, and R.W. Ruess. 2009. Population density of North American elk: effects on plant diversity. Oecologia 161:303-312.

Monteith*, K.L., L.E. Schmitz, J.A. Jenks, J.A. Delger, and R.T. Bowyer. 2009. Growth of male white-tailed deer: consequences of maternal effects. 90: 651-660. Journal of Mammalogy.

Bowyer, R.T., V. C. Bleich, X. Manteca, J. C. Whiting*, and K. M. Stewart. 2007. Sociality, mate choice, and timing of mating in American bison (Bison bison): effects of large males. Ethology 113:1048-1060.

Stewart*, K. M., R.T. Bowyer, R. W. Ruess, B. L. Dick, and J. G. Kie. 2006. Herbivore optimization by North American elk: consequences for theory and management. Wildlife Monographs 167:1-24.

Bowyer, R.T., and J.G. Kie. 2006. Effects of scale on interpreting life-history characteristics of ungulates and carnivores. Diversity and Distributions 12:244-257. (Outstanding Publication Award from the Wildlife Society)

Stewart*, K.M., R.T. Bowyer, B.L. Dick, B.K. Johnson, and J.G. Kie. 2005. Density-dependent effects on physical condition and reproduction in North American elk: an experimental test. Oecologia 143:85-93.

Bowyer, R.T. Sexual segregation in ruminants: definitions, hypotheses, and implications for conservation and management. Journal of Mammalogy 85:1039-1052. (Merriam Award Paper)

Bowyer, R.T., G.M. Blundell*, M. Ben-David, S.C. Jewett, T.A. Dean, and L.K. Duffy. 2003. Effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on river otters: injury and recovery of a sentinel species. Wildlife Monographs 153:1-53. (Outstanding Publication Award from The Wildlife Society)

Kie, J.G., R.T. Bowyer, M.C. Nicholson, B.B. Boroski, and E.R. Loft. 2002. Landscape heterogeneity at differing scales: effects on spatial distribution of mule deer. Ecology 83:530-544. (Outstanding Publication Award from The Wildlife Society)

Pierce*, B.M., V.C. Bleich, and R.T. Bowyer. 2000. Social organization of mountain lions: does a land-tenure system regulate population size? Ecology 81:1533-1543.

Barboza, P.S., and R.T. Bowyer. 2000. Sexual segregation in dimorphic deer: a new gastrocentric hypothesis. Journal of Mammalogy 81:473-489.

Bowyer, R.T., V. Van Ballenberghe, J.G. Kie, and J.A.K. Maier. 1999. Birth-site selection by Alaskan moose: maternal strategies for coping with a risky environment. Journal of Mammalogy 80:1070-1083.

Kie, J.G., and R.T. Bowyer. 1999. Sexual segregation in white-tailed deer: density-dependent changes in use of space, habitat selection, and dietary niche. Journal of Mammalogy 80:1004-1020.

Bleich*, V.C., R.T. Bowyer, and J.D. Wehausen. 1997. Sexual segregation in mountain sheep: resources or predation? Wildlife Monographs 134:1-50. (Outstanding Publication Award from The Wildlife Society)


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