Department of Anthropology

Faculty ProfileKate with pineapple in Dutch Harbor

Katherine Reedy-Maschner

Assistant Professor

Background

B.A., University of Wisconsin (1997); Ph.D., University of Cambridge (2004).

I have conducted anthropological fieldwork all over Alaska, from Nome to the Aleutians and Prince William Sound. I am a native Idahoan raising two sons (born 2001 and 2005) with my husband. I have been affiliate faculty in the Anthropology Department since 2000, with a tenure line appointment beginning in 2007.


Research Interests

Since 2000, I have worked in Aleut villages of Alaska mapping socioeconomic relations around commercial and subsistence fisheries, including identity and status, economic development, fisheries permit access and policies, the globalization of fisheries, Aleut social life, and Russian and Scandinavian heritages on the North Pacific. My dissertation investigated the role of traditional commercial and subsistence economies in the construction of Aleut identity. Research interests include socio-ecological and applied anthropology, social anthropology of northern peoples, subsistence and commercial fishing practices, indigenous rights and representations of identity, Aleut culture and history, globalization, human relationships to endangered species, and environmental policymaking.


Ongoing Research

I was awarded a U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement contract to conduct a subsistence harvest and local land use study in four Alaska Peninsula/Aleutian Island communities most proximate to the proposed offshore North Aleutian Basin oil and gas development project. This project provides an assessment of individual and community subsistence use and resilience in the context of changes or disruptions associated with the development in the Aleut and Alutiiq villages of Akutan, False Pass, Nelson Lagoon, and Port Heiden, Alaska.

I am working on a book based upon a NSF-funded fisheries policy project on the role of Alaska Native people in the structuring of fisheries policies, looking specifically at how people use elements of tradition, culture, the language of rights, scientific data and history, for example, in order to recover, preserve and expand fishing rights in front of the Alaska Board of Fisheries. Salmons’ migratory ranges cross numerous cultural boundaries, and each society lays claim to the fish in dynamic ways. The goals of this project are to test the link between indigenous people’s testimony at the Board of Fisheries level in order to understand indigenous relations with one another and with governmental entities, how they shape fisheries policies, and to understand the effects of past and current regulations on village life.

I am also co-PI on an NSF Biocomplexity project entitled “Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Relationships Over Multidimensional Scales: the Sanak Islands Project.” This is a multidisciplinary team of anthropologists and ecologists on Sanak Island in the North Pacific with the goal of investigating the long-term roles of humans within the ecosystem. We see the local inhabitants as key elements in the functioning of the north Pacific ecosystem, and are investigating how natural changes in the environment have conditioned human social behavior.


Selected Publications

In Press. “Where did all the Aleut men go?”: Aleut Male Attrition and Related Patterns in Aleutian Demography and Social Organization. Human Biology

2010. Aleut Identities: Life and Society among Indigenous Commercial fishermen of the North Pacific. Manuscript accepted for publication at McGill-Queen’s University Press.

2009. Guest editor, North by Northwest Special Volume. Alaska Journal of Anthropology 7(2), with Matt Betts and Owen Mason.

2009a. Cherchez les Poissons: Gender Roles in an Aleut Indigenous Commercial Economy. For the Canadian Circumpolar Institute volume Gender, Culture and Northern Fisheries (edited by Joanna Kafarowski).

2009b. Entangled Livelihoods: Economic Integration and Diversity in the Western Arctic. Alaska Journal of Anthropology 7(2):135-146.

2008. Eastern Aleut Society under Three Decades of Limited Entry. For Enclosing the Fisheries: People, Places, and Power. American Fisheries Society Press. (edited by Courtney Carothers and Marie Lowe)

2008. Herbert D.G. Maschner, Matthew Betts, Katherine L. Reedy-Maschner, and Andrew Trites. A 4500-year time series of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) size and abundance: Archaeology, regime shifts, and sustainable fisheries. Fishery Bulletin 106(4).

2008. Herbert D.G. Maschner and Katherine L. Reedy-Maschner. The Evolution of Violence. In Alexander Bentley, Editor. The Edge of Reason: Science and Religion in Modern Society. Continuum Press.

2007. The Best-Laid Plans: Limited Entry permits and Limited Entry systems in Eastern Aleut Culture. Human Organization 66(2):210-225.

2007. Herbert Maschner and Katherine L. Reedy-Maschner. Heads, Women, and the Baubles of Prestige: Trophies of War in the Arctic and Subarctic. In The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians. Richard Chacon and David Dye (editors). Springer Press.

2006. Bottom-Up Forcing and the Decline of Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatas) in Alaska: Assessing the Ocean Climate Hypothesis. Andrew W. Trites, Arthur J. Miller, Herbert D.G. Maschner, Michael A. Alexander, Steven J. Bograd, Antonietta Capotondi, Kenneth O. Coyle, Emanuele Di Lorenzo, Thomas C. Royer, Edward J. Gregr, Chester E. Grosch, Bruce P. Finney, Lowell Fritz, George L. Hunt, Jaime Jahncke, Nancy B. Kachel, Hey-Jin Kim, Carol Ladd, Nathan J. Mantua, Caren Marzban, Wieslaw Maslowski, Douglas J. Neilson, James E. Overland, Stephen R. Okkonen, Katherine L. Reedy-Maschner, Julian X. L. Wang, and Arliss J. Winship. Fisheries Oceanography. 15(7):1-22.

2005. Herbert Maschner and Katherine Reedy-Maschner. Aleuts and the Sea. Archaeology Magazine March/April, pp. 63-70.


Courses Taught

Anthropology 2237: Food and Culture
Anthropology 2238: Peoples of the Arctic
Anthropology 2250: Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
Anthropology 4402/5502: Ecological Anthropology
Anthropology 4481/5581: Ethnographic Classics
Anthropology 4493/5593: Applied Anthropology
Anthropology 6625: Sociocultural Seminar in Anthropology
History 6600: Ethnohistory


Awards

2010 Supplement to National Science Foundation, Polar Programs: Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Systems over Multidimensional Temporal, Spatial, and Demographic Scales: the Sanak Island Project. Reedy-Maschner, Co-PI ($219,850).

2009 Supplement to National Science Foundation, Polar Programs: Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Systems over Multidimensional Temporal, Spatial, and Demographic Scales: the Sanak Island Project. Reedy-Maschner, Co-PI ($9,550)

2008 Subsistence Study for the North Aleutian Basin, U.S. Department of Interior, Minerals Management Service study contract. Reedy-Maschner, PI ($339,793)

2006 National Science Foundation, Polar Programs: Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Systems over Multidimensional Temporal, Spatial, and Demographic Scales: the Sanak Island Project. (Herbert Maschner, PI; Bruce Finney, Nancy Huntly, Jim Jordan, and K.L. Reedy-Maschner co-PIs) ($1,150,000)

2005 National Science Foundation, Arctic Social Sciences: Analyzing Fisheries Policy and Alaska Native Testimony on the Area M Salmon Fisheries. Reedy-Maschner, PI ($199, 947)

2005 Supplement to National Science Foundation, Polar Programs: Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Systems Over Multidimensional Temporal, Spatial, and Demographic Scales: the Sanak Island Project. Herbert Maschner, PI; Bruce Finney, Nancy Huntly, Jim Jordan, co-PIs and K.L. Reedy-Maschner, Senior Scientist ($32,225)

2004 National Science Foundation, Polar Programs: REU Supplement for the Sanak Islands Project. Herbert Maschner, PI; Bruce Finney, Nancy Huntly, Jim Jordan, co-PIs and K.L. Reedy-Maschner, Senior Scientist ($15,641)

2004 USFWS Subsistence: Western Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Traditional Subsistence Fisheries Evaluation and Traditional Ecological Knowledge Project. Reedy-Maschner, Co-PI ($16,000)

2004 National Science Foundation OPP 0326584: Investigating Complex Human-Ecological Relationships over Multidimensional Scales: The Sanak Islands Project (Herbert Maschner, PI; Bruce Finney, Nancy Huntly, Jim Jordan, co-PIs). Reedy-Maschner, Senior Scientist ($340,000)

2002 NOAA, Indigenous Observations, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Steller Sea Lion Populations along the Western Alaska Peninsula and Eastern Aleutians, Maschner and Reedy-Maschner, Joint PIs ($393,450)

2002 USFWS Subsistence: Western Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Traditional Subsistence Fisheries Evaluation and Traditional Ecological Knowledge Project. Reedy-Maschner, Co-PI ($141,891).

2001 National Science Foundation BE/CNH 0119743, Agent-Based Modeling of Bering Sea Biocomplexity: Long-term Ecological Effects of Human-Salmon Interactions. Reedy-Maschner, Co-PI ($80,000).

2000 National Science Foundation OPP-0094826. Identity and Violence: Crime, Competition and Changing Traditions in Unangan Villages of the Eastern Aleutian Region, Reedy-Maschner, PI. ($29,107).

 

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